Cross Cultural Menopause Symptoms

9/29/2016 • Cross Cultural  Menopause Symptoms To understand the range of variation in women’s interests, behaviors, concerns, and self‐care Menop...
0 downloads 0 Views 331KB Size
9/29/2016



Cross Cultural  Menopause Symptoms

To understand the range of variation in women’s interests, behaviors, concerns, and self‐care

Menopause Hormonal

Lynnette L. Sievert, BSN, PhD 

Anthropology • Holistic • Comparative

Family roles Occupation

Department of Anthropology, UMass Amherst Psychological Musculoskeletal Religious roles

Why study across cultures?

• To identify human universals and specific cultural influences

• To document the range of variation in human biology

on symptom experience

(context)

Age

Begum et al. 2016

1

9/29/2016

Emic Perspective

• Informant’s own views, attitudes, and meanings • Open‐ended questions • Rich information (difficult to compare)

Etic Perspective

• Standardized instruments, checklists  • Anthropometrics • Clinical measures  • “Culture proof”  ? • Comparable  ?

Comparative studies of symptom frequencies Anthropology of menopause • Marcha Flint (1975) •

Rajput Indians did not experience hot flashes

• Dona Lee Davis (1983)  •

Newfoundland “blood” and “nerves”

• Yewoubdar Beyene (1989) •

Absence of hot flashes in Chichimilá, Yucatan

• Margaret Lock (1993) •

Ambiguous change of life in Japan

• Across multiple countries • US (McKinlay), Canada (Kaufert), Japan (Lock), Australia (Dennerstein) • Decisions at Menopause Study (DAMeS)  (Obermeyer et al. 2007) US, Spain, Lebanon, Morocco

• Australian/Japanese Midlife Women’s Health Study  (Anderson et al. 2004)

• Women’s International Study of Health and Sexuality (WISHeS)  France, Germany, US, UK, Italy  (Dennerstein et al. 2007)

• France and Tunisia (Ferrand et al. 2013) Melby et al. 2011

2

9/29/2016

Comparative studies of symptom frequencies

Percentage of symptom frequencies past 4 weeks  from DAMES (n=1200, ages 45‐55)

• Across ethnic groups within the same country • Study of Women’s Health across the Nation (SWAN)  • Women’s Health in Midlife National Study in Israel Long term Jewish residents, immigrants from the former Soviet Union, Arab Israelis (Lerner‐Geva et al. 2010)

• Four Major Ethnic Groups (internet)  (Im et al. 2010) • Hilo Women’s Health Survey (Brown et al. 2009; Sievert et al. 2007) Japanese, Hawaiian, European‐American 

70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

• Campeche, Mexico, Maya and non‐Maya  (Huicochea et al. in press)

Beirut Depression

Rabat HeadAche

Madrid JointPain

HotFlashes

Massachusetts Loss of urinary control Obermeyer et al. 2007

Melby et al 2011

Comparative studies of symptom frequencies

• Between migrants, their new neighbors, and women  still residing in their country of origin

• Indians in Birmingham, UK (Gupta et al. 2006) • Latin American immigrants in Madrid (Perez‐Alcala et al. 2013) • Bangladeshis in London, UK (Sievert et al. 2016)

Factor analyses

• To examine how symptoms at midlife group together • To see examine how those groupings differ across countries  • Example:  DAMeS (Sievert et al. 2007)

3

9/29/2016

• Similarities across all 4 countries:

• Anxiety and depression clustered together • Difficulty concentrating and memory loss clustered together

Hot flash frequencies two weeks before interview Puebla, Mexico

• Difference:  Fatigue/weakness 

• Clustered with mental symptoms in the U.S. • With emotional symptoms in Lebanon • With somatic symptoms in Morocco

• Difference:  Hot flashes 

• Clustered with vaginal dryness and sexual symptoms in Spain • Clustered with somatic symptoms in Morocco • Not included in factors in the U.S. or Lebanon

45%

Asunción, Paraguay

43%

Hilo, Hawaii

34% 

Selška Valley, Slovenia

24%

Western Massachusetts

24% 

Maká of Paraguay

What have we learned from cross‐cultural  work?  The importance of language. Hot flashes are not always the most  common symptom  at midlife.  But hot flashes are  one of the most  bothersome  symptoms at midlife.

What word should we use to describe hot flashes?

• Japan • • •

Hawaii n=1824

Mexico n=755

Atsuku naru Kaa;   Hoteri Nabose

• Mexico • • •

Bangladesh n=157

7% Sievert 2006; Sievert and Espinosa‐Hernandez 2003;  Sievert et al. 2004, 2007, 2008

Sievert et al. 2007

Symptoms past 2 wks Women aged 40-60

50%

Sylhet, Bangladesh

Bochornos;   Calores Sudores;   Sofocos Oleadas de calor

• Bangladesh • • • •

Gorom vap laga Gorom faap laga Akhta groom laga Matha dia dhuma jai

• South Africa  •

14 languages

Huicochea et al. in press; Jaff 2014; Melby 2005; Sievert 2014

4

9/29/2016

Have you ever felt bochornos or calores and,  if so, why?  Mayan women in Xmabén • used the word calor, and associated hot flashes with • clima ambiental (ambient temperature) • la presión arterial (blood pressure) • las infecciones por enfermedad (infections) • sentir que se ahogan (the feeling of suffocation)

Have you ever felt bochornos or calores and, if  so, why? Women who work in government  offices in the city of Campeche  describe hot flashes as part of a series of symptoms including

• • • •

sudor (sweating) enrojecimiento (reddening) nervios (nervousness) mal humor (bad mood or anger)

Huicochea et al. In press, Menopause

Huicochea et al. In press, Menopause

Have you ever felt bochornos or calores and, if  so, why? Mestizo women in Cristóbol Colón Women who have experienced hot flashes describe: 

• • • •

nervios (nervousness) desesperación (despair) ahogo (suffocation)

Measurement of hot flashes

• Questionnaires • Diaries • Body diagrams • Ambulatory monitors

sudor (sweating)

Huicochea et al. In press, Menopause

5

9/29/2016

Where women feel hot flashes Top of head Bangladesh 64% Mexico 46% US 27%

Back of neck Mexico 100% Bangladesh 46% US 40%

Diurnal pattern of hot flashes, Detroit, MI Freedman et al. 1995

Peak 6 PM

Face Mexico 100% US 87% Bangladesh 46%

Upper chest US 100% Mexico 92% Bangladesh 68%

Whitehead et al. 1993

Diurnal pattern of hot flashes in Hilo, Hawaii Sievert et al. 2010 Menopause

Hot flashes:  Human universals

Peak 3 PM

• Discomfort • Diurnal variation • Association with menopausal transition

6

9/29/2016

Prevalence of menopause symptoms in the Study of Women Entering and in Endocrine Transition (SWEET) Chart Title

%

90 80 70 60 50 40 30 20 10 0

Swan+ 10 stages

Ambulatory studies of hot flashes Biolog monitor Brown et al. 2011 ‐3b and ‐3a

‐2 and ‐1 Vasomotor

1a, 1b, and 1c Sexual

+2

Carpenter et al. 1999

Irritability

Sievert et al. 2008

Black South African women, aged 40-60 (n=702), prevalence of obesity 63%. Significantly higher prevalence of vasomotor symptoms (VMS) and sexual problems in early postmenopause stage. Severe/very severe VMS prevalence significantly higher (28.2%) in women with BMI 35+ kg/m2 compared with the lower BMI groups (20.2%) (Jaff et al. 2014).

Thurston et al. 2008 

Do Japanese women have fewer hot flashes? Culture‐specific comparisons of  subjective and objective hot flashes

Frequency of hot flashes among women  of menopausal age

12% Japan 33% Massachusetts

Lock 1986, 1993

22% Japan

Melby 2005

12% Japanese‐Americans in California 16% Chinese‐Americans in California 26% European‐Americans (7 sites) 26% Latinas in New Jersey 39% African‐Americans (4 sites)

Avis et al. 2001  (SWAN)

28% Japanese in Hilo, Hawaii 37% European‐Americans in Hilo, Hawaii 

Sievert et al. 2007

7

9/29/2016

Hilo, Hawaii study (n=208, aged 45‐55)

Number of hot flashes

Obj.

Ambulatory, objective hot flashes Subjective hot flashes, ambulatory Laboratory objective hot flashes Subjective hot flashes in laboratory

Obj.

24 hour, ambulatory Subj.

3 hour, laboratory

Subj. Obj.

Subj.

European-American

No difference  in objective  hot flash  experience Bangladeshi sedentees Bangladeshi immigrants White, London neighbors

Obj. Subj. Japanese-American Brown et al. 2009

Culture‐related determinants of  hot flash experience

Sievert et al. 2016, Am J Physical Anthro

• Religion

• Clothing • Religion • Social Norms

8

9/29/2016

Social Norms

• Smoking habits • Alcohol intake • Physical activity • Diet and weight • Access to birth control • Sources of stress Funding:  NSF #BCS‐1156368 with Laura Huicochea, Daniel Brown, and  Diana Cahuich; NSF Grant #0548393 with Gillian Bentley and  Shanthi Muttukrishna; NIH grant No. S06‐GM08073‐32 Daniel  Brown (PI) and Lynn Morrison; NSF # 9805299.

Additional variation across cultures • Attitudes toward menstruation, menopause, and aging • Physical or emotional phenomena associated with menopausal symptoms • What women think is culturally appropriate to discuss with clinicians • Generation of migration

9