Course outline. Code: ENS320 Title: Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation

Course outline Code: ENS320 Title: Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation Faculty of: Science, Health, Education and Engineering Teaching Session: ...
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Course outline Code: ENS320 Title: Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation Faculty of: Science, Health, Education and Engineering Teaching Session: Semester 2 Year: 2016 Course Coordinator: Kate English Email: [email protected] Course Moderator: A/Prof Neil Tindale

1.

What is this course about?

1.1

Course description

This course introduces you to climate change mitigation: actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and enhance carbon sinks. You’ll learn about atmospheric science, environmental economics, and international negotiations. You’ll investigate emissions in the Australian economy and look at ways to reduce them. You’ll use global greenhouse gas emission data and climate modelling projections to develop an international mitigation agreement that is fair and effective in avoiding dangerous climate change. This course is relevant to careers in science, planning, engineering, public policy and business. 1.2 Course content Avoiding significant and irreversible changes to the global climate system will require enormous shifts in all aspects of human existence including how we produce energy, transport people and materials, house and feed a growing population and consume natural resources. This course will focus on: - the science of climate change, greenhouse gas sources and sinks, - modeling emission scenarios and their impacts on temperature and sea level, - investigating the links between socio-economic development, emissions and climate change, - examining national and international policy responses to reduce greenhouse gases, - economics of climate change mitigation policy and - exploring technological, economic and social responses that can manage emissions in a way that balances the needs of current and future generations and ensures the long-term integrity of environmental systems.

2.

Unit value

12 units

Version Semester 2 2016

Recfind File Number: F14081

Page 2 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation

3.

How does this course contribute to my learning?

On successful completion of this course you should be able to: Describe the primary greenhouse gases sources and sinks, explain how they influence the global climate system, and discuss policy responses such as carbon taxes and emissions trading schemes. Find, analyse and critically appraise a diverse array of data and information used for decision making purposes on climate change mitigation. Identify and present measures to reduce emissions within particular sectors that consider the benefits and drawbacks of alternative technologies and actions. Understand the basic aspects of modelling the influence of greenhouse gas emissions on the climate and developing policy responses that take account of ethical and practical considerations.

4.

You will be assessed on the learning outcome in task/s:

Completing these tasks successfully will contribute to you becoming: Knowledgeable.

Assessment Task 3 – Final exam Assessment Task 1 – Emissions projections report Assessment Task 2 – Report on emissions sources in Australia Assessment Task 1 – Emissions projections report Assessment Task 1 – Report on emissions sources in Australia

Creative and critical thinkers.

Assessment Task 1 – Emissions projections report

Creative and critical thinkers. Sustainability-focussed.

Sustainability-focussed.

Am I eligible to enrol in this course?

Refer to the Undergraduate Coursework Programs and Awards - Academic Policy for definitions of “prerequisites, co-requisites and anti-requisites”

4.1

Enrolment restrictions

Nil

4.2 Nil

Pre-requisites

4.3

Co-requisites

Nil

4.4

Anti-requisites

Nil

4.5

Specific assumed prior knowledge and skills (optional)

You won’t be expected to have prior knowledge of climate science or economics. Students are expected to know how to use basic software programs such as Microsoft Word and PowerPoint as well as the USC databases. There are workshops provided by USC in Academic Skills. The Essential Skills Workshop schedule can be found during orientation week on the USC webpage.

Page 3 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation

5.

How am I going to be assessed?

5.1

Grading scale

Standard – High Distinction (HD), Distinction (DN), Credit (CR), Pass (PS), Fail (FL)

5.2 Task No. 1

2

3

Assessment tasks ENS320 Assessment Tasks Emissions projections report Report on emissions sources in Australia

Final exam

Individual or Group

Weighting %

Individual

25

Group

40 Part A: draft outline with referencing/oral presentation

Individual

Part B: written report 35

What is the duration / length? 1200 words +/10%

When should I submit?

Where should I submit it?

Week 6

Electronic via Blackboard

Part A: 15 minutes

Part A: Week 9

Part A: in class

Part B: 2000 words +/- 10%

Part B: Week 11

Part B: Electronic via Blackboard

1 hour 50 minutes

Week 13

In lecture time Week 13

100% Assessment Task 1: Emissions projections report Goal:

Product: Format:

Criteria

To describe the influence of different factors in a national greenhouse gas emissions inventory in a selected country (other than Australia) and to develop a global policy response that avoids dangerous climate change and considers the ethical challenges of this complex problem. The task involves using actual greenhouse gas emissions data from the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios, national greenhouse gas emissions inventories and climate modelling projections to develop global emission reduction strategies and determine their likely effectiveness in avoiding dangerous climate change. The task involves making explicit decisions about the timing, location and types of gases which will be reduced. Resulting pathways reflect both practical and ethical choices with regard to developed and developing country mitigation effort, trade-offs between development and poverty, and intergenerational equity: outcomes that are at the heart of international climate change negotiations. Technical report Technical report format with the output of computer modelling performed by the student. Report will include diagrams and figures and will be written in the format of a consultant’s report with a brief cover letter. 1200words +/- 10%. The individual report will be assessed on: • Format, style and presentation • Interpretation of national greenhouse gas emission trajectory for selected country (other than Australia), climate model parameters and accuracy of climate change projections • Depth of analysis supporting the proposed global climate mitigation policy response that would avoid dangerous climate change • Analysis of the rationale of country’s emissions projection portfolio on its per capita emissions and percentage of global emissions over time • Incorporation of ethical issues including inter-generational and intra-generational equity

Page 4 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation • Consideration of technical and institutional limitations to the proposed policy response • Clarity of communication and presentation  Adherence to word limit Generic skill assessed Skill assessment level Information literacy Graduate Problem solving Graduate Applying technologies Graduate Assessment Task 2: Report on sectoral emission reduction strategies in Australia. Goal:

To investigate, analyse and present a report on selected sectors of the Australian economy (i.e. energy, agriculture, buildings, transportation) that describes: the emission sources and sinks within the sector, different actions or technologies that could be used to mitigate emissions in the sector, barriers to their adoption, and policies that would be supportive of their introduction and expansion. Product: Oral presentation with written report (including outline, literature review and referencing as initial submission) Format: Part A: Group oral presentation with supporting visual material, Part B: Written report, 2000 words. Criteria Format, style and presentation • Strength of arguments, analysis and reasoning: - Development and analysis - Graphics, tables and charts - Structure and transitions - Conclusions and recommendations • Background literature used and referencing Organisation and meeting deadlines • Individual contribution to group Generic skill assessed Skill assessment level Communication Graduate Collaboration Graduate Assessment Task 3: Final exam Goal:

To consolidate and demonstrate your knowledge of the key concepts, theories and practices in climate change mitigation. Product: Exam Format: 1 hour 50 minutes Multiple choice, short answer and long answer Criteria  Ability to identify/describe key mitigation terms and concepts with accuracy  Ability to explain and relate social, economic or technological responses to climate change mitigation and to explain their strengths and limitations Generic skill assessed Skill assessment level Information literacy Graduate Communication Graduate

Page 5 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation

5.3

Additional assessment requirements

Blackboard As a student enrolled in this course you will have access to course information on the Blackboard site. You are strongly recommended to log onto the course site on a regular basis. All course announcements, course changes, posting of course materials and grades (via My Interim Results) will be accessed through Blackboard. It is your responsibility to ensure you have adequate internet access (either off campus or oncampus) in order to access Blackboard regularly and to complete required assessment tasks. Safe Assign In order to minimise incidents of plagiarism and collusion, this course may require that some of its assessment tasks are submitted electronically via Safe Assign. This software allows for text comparisons to be made between the students submitted assessment item and all other work that Safe Assign has access to. If required, details of how to submit via Safe Assign will be provided on the Blackboard site of the course. Eligibility for Supplementary Assessment Your eligibility for supplementary assessment in a course is dependent of the following conditions applying: a) The final mark is in the percentage range 47% to 49.4% b) The course is graded using the Standard Grading scale c) You have not failed an assessment task in the course due to academic misconduct

5.4

Submission penalties

Late submission of assessment tasks will be penalised at the following maximum rate:  5% (of the assessment task’s identified value) per day for the first two days from the date identified as the due date for the assessment task.  10% (of the assessment task’s identified value) for the third day  20% (of the assessment task’s identified value) for the fourth day and subsequent days up to and including seven days from the date identified as the due date for the assessment task.  A result of zero is awarded for an assessment task submitted after seven days from the date identified as the due date for the assessment task. Weekdays and weekends are included in the calculation of days late. To request an extension you must contact your course coordinator to negotiate an outcome.

6. How is the course offered? 6.1

Directed study hours

13 x 2 hour lectures and 13 x 2 hour Tutorials

6.2

Teaching semester/session(s) offered

Semester 2

Page 6 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation

6.3

Course activities

Teaching Week / Module

1

2

What key concepts/content will I learn?

Lecture: Relationships between greenhouse gas emissions and climate change. The sources and sinks for these gases at the global level. Lecture: Policy instruments for emission reductions: carbon taxes.

3

Lecture: Policy instruments for emission reductions: emission trading schemes and offset projects.

4

Lecture: Mitigation and sustainable development: how they fit together and the importance of co-benefits

5

Lecture: International organisations and governance structures, agreements and reduction targets

6

Lecture: Focus on Australia - what are our national emission reduction policies?

7

Lecture: Sector specific focus Waste

8

Lecture: Sector specific focus Residential and commercial buildings

9

Lecture: Sector specific focus Transportation and its infrastructure

What activities will I engage in to learn the concepts/content? Directed Study Activities Independent Study Activities Tutorial: Introduction to global Begin review, investigate emissions and projections and apply knowledge in (Task 1) exercise and review of preparation for Task 1. assessment criteria. Tutorial: dedicated time for individual modelling task with instructor support Tutorial: dedicated time for individual projections and modelling task with instructor support Tutorial: dedicated time for individual projections modelling task with instructor support Tutorial: Discuss instructions for group research project and final topic selection. Review a sectoral mitigation strategy project example. Tutorial: Assign team members to group tasks, discuss topic outline and oral presentation outline for investigation, and review the portfolio format. Formative feedback on oral presentation and report outline. Tutorial: review and discuss Task 2 Group project. Exercise in how to work effectively in groups. Group selection process. Tutorial: Formative assessment for Task 1, which is due in week 6.

Selected readings and work on Task 1

Tutorial: Final formative assessment opportunity for report and dedicated time for task with help as needed.

Group work final revisions. Review, investigate and apply knowledge

Selected readings and work on Task 1

Begin to think about your group research topic.

Begin research and outline development. Review, investigate and apply knowledge Begin group work on Assessment 2. Review, investigate and apply knowledge

Continue group work on Assessment 2 written report.

Work on development of Task 2. Review, investigate and apply knowledge

Page 7 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation 10

Lecture: Sector specific focus Industry

Tutorial: dedicated time for individual modelling task with instructor support 11 Lecture: Sector specific focus Tutorial: Finalise and submit Energy individual modelling reports. 12 Lecture: Sector specific focus Tutorial: Review for final Agriculture and forestry exam 13 Final exam Tutorial: Review of final exam. Please note that the course activities may be subject to variation.

Selected readings and work on Task 2 Selected readings and work on Task 2 Exam preparation. Exam preparation.

7. What resources do I need to undertake this course? 7.1

Prescribed text(s)

There is no prescribed text. It just can’t be fit into a single text it would seem.

7.2

Required and recommended readings

The reading list brings together the most interesting and relevant sources of information needed to understand climate change mitigation and excel in your assessment tasks. Recommended readings will include sections of:  IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios  IPCC Fourth and Fifth Assessment Report: Working Group III Report, Summary for Policy Makers  Garnaut Climate Change Review  Australia's Low Pollution Future: The Economics of Climate Change Mitigation, Summary Additional readings will be posted after you have had a chance to identify your research interests.

7.3

Specific requirements

None

7.4

Risk management

There is minimal health and safety risk in this course. It is your responsibility to familiarise yourself with the Health and Safety policies and procedures applicable within campus areas.

8.

How can I obtain help with my studies?

In the first instance you should contact your tutor, then the Course Coordinator. Additional assistance to all students through Peer Advisors and Academic Skills Advisors. You can drop in or book an appointment. To book: Tel: +61 7 5430 2890 or Email: student [email protected]

9.

Links to relevant University policies and procedures

For more information on Academic Learning & Teaching categories including:  Assessment: Courses and Coursework Programs  Review of Assessment and Final Grades  Supplementary Assessment  Administration of Central Examinations  Deferred Examinations  Student Academic Misconduct  Students with a Disability http://www.usc.edu.au/university/governance-and-executive/policies-and-procedures#academic-learningand-teaching

Page 8 Course Outline: ENS320 Introduction to Climate Change Mitigation

10. Faculty specific information In person:  Sippy Downs - Student Central, Ground Floor, Building C  USC South Bank - Student Central, Building B, Ground floor (level 1)  USC Gympie - Student Central, 71 Cartwright Road, Gympie  USC Fraser Coast - Student Central, Building A Tel: +61 7 5430 2890 Email: [email protected]

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