CORE CURRICULUM SJC BROOKLYN ACADEMIC YEAR. SJC BROOKLYN 245 Clinton Avenue Brooklyn, NY sjcny.edu 9

CORE CURRICULUM SJC BROOKLYN 245 Clinton Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 718-940-5800 sjcny.edu 9.28/2973 SJC BROOKLYN | 2015-2016 ACADEMIC YEAR COLLEGE...
Author: Rosa Fleming
1 downloads 0 Views 10MB Size
CORE CURRICULUM SJC BROOKLYN 245 Clinton Avenue Brooklyn, NY 11205 718-940-5800 sjcny.edu

9.28/2973

SJC BROOKLYN | 2015-2016 ACADEMIC YEAR

COLLEGE MISSION The mission of St. Joseph’s College is to provide a strong academic and value-oriented education at the undergraduate and graduate levels, rooted in a liberal arts tradition that supports provision for career preparation and enhancement. The College prepares each student for a life characterized by integrity, intellectual and spiritual values, social responsibility and service. A life that is worthy of the College’s motto: Esse non videri — “To be, not to seem.”

COMMON LEARNING AREA

QUEST FOR MEANING

The St. Joseph’s College core curriculum includes two courses that form the basis for the general education program. The courses in this common learning area improve student writing and communication skills and introduce first-year students to college-level academic work and the college experience at St. Joseph’s through a topic-based seminar and a required first-year experience program. Transfer students enroll in SJC 200 rather than in SJC 100 and FYE.

Rationale: Some questions transcend our specific culture and are deeper and broader than a focused preparation for a career. They invite us to engage in a sustained practice of self-reflection in community with others on things that matter to us as human beings in the world.

c

Students are required to take two courses in this area.

ENG 103 Writing for Effective Communication

Analysis and application of the principles of effective writing. Skills developed in the performance of various writing tasks. Research techniques are also implemented.

Description: Course offerings in this area examine various human attempts to understand the nature of such values as truth, beauty, goodness, justice and love; and invites students to engage in a systematic examination of such core human questions as: Who am I? Why do I exist? What can I know? How can I be a good person? For what can I hope? And even to question these questions. Outcome: Students will be able to formulate and articulate their own view of the meaning of human existence, morality and the good life. Students should achieve a working knowledge of some of the ways in which humans have approached these big questions and attempted to answer them. CLA/PHI 154 Sources of Great Western Ideas c ENG 112 Classical Literature c ENG 113 Introduction to Drama c ENG 114 Introduction to Poetry c ENG 115 The Short Story c ENG 117 NY Scene in Literature c ENG 119 A Rainbow of Voices c ENG 218 Medieval Literature c ENG 219 Literature of the English Renaissance c ENG 221 Seventeenth Century Literature c ENG 222 The Age of Johnson c ENG 233 Prose and Poetry of the English Romantic Movement c ENG 234 Victorian Prose and Poetry c ENG 241 The Rise and Development of the Novel c ENG 243 Nineteenth Century British Novel c ENG 245 Modern British Novel c ENG 253 Modern Poetry c ENG 256 The Bible as Literature c ENG 258 American Renaissance c ENG 259 Modern American Novel c ENG 261 African American Literature c ENG 262 Resonant Voices c ENG 263 American Literaure, 1890-1945 c ENG 264 American Literaure since 1945 c ENG 292 Survey in British Literature I c ENG 293 Survey in British Literature II c ENG 294 Survey in Amer Lit Begin to 1865 c ENG 295 Survey in Amer Lit Since 1865 c ENG 303 Continental Masterworks c ENG 305 Chaucer c ENG 320 Milton c ENG 358 American Renaissance c ENG 359 American Literature, 1890–1945 c ENG 360 American Literature Since 1945 c ENG 332 Shakespeare c HIS/RS 112 Religion in American Life c PHI 123 The Art of Thinking c PHI 124 Invitation to Philosophy c PHI 135 Models of Self c PHI 150 Great Philosophers c PHI/CLA 154 Sources of Great Western Ideas c PHI 160 Introduction to Ethics c PHI 196 The Ancient World c

c

SJC 100 The Freshman Seminar



c

FYE First-Year Experience Program

A seminar course for all first-year students that will introduce you to the academic world of college and, along with the required First-Year Experience Program (FYE), will serve to engage you in the college experience here at St. Joseph’s. Each course section focuses on a unique and engaging topic related to the discipline or avocation of the instructor, and may also incorporate interdisciplinary themes. This course will offer a laboratory experience of careful and critical reading, writing to learn, research skills, and cooperative classroom activities.

2015 Courses, SJC Brooklyn Instructors

c

George Orwell and Dystopias Since 1984 The Sociology of Sports and Society The Films of the Coen Brothers: Western, Noir, and the American Style The Value of Play Martial Arts Philosophy in Action Microbiology and the Great War Seeing Emotions Through Lenses: Therapeutic Photography and Cinema Global Changes and Challenges Exploring New York City Out of the Box Encountering Counterculture in 20th Century America Into the Wild Reading the Great War

c

SJC 200 Transfer Seminar

c c c c c c c c c c c

Phillip Dehne Joseph Pascarella Seth Armus Jeremy Cash William Trevino Michael Hanophy Peter Lin Antoinette Hertel Jane Beckwith Mik Larson Catherine Meehan Kris Percival

This one-credit course will introduce new transfer students to the mission and goals of St. Joseph’s College. Additionally, students will explore learning and research skills, opportunities for campus and community involvement, and the nature of the liberal arts as envisioned by SJC. This course is required of all transfer students as a vital part of the process of becoming familiar with the ethos of St. Joseph’s College and helping them to integrate into our social and learning environment.

THEMATIC LEARNING AREAS The St. Joseph’s College core curriculum includes courses that represent the areas of human knowledge and culture deemed essential for a liberal education — that is, for free men and women who must assume responsibility for directing their own lives and contributing to national and international decisions. By grouping the courses into five broad thematic learning areas, the College has indicated the relationships among the various disciplines and the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the liberal arts and sciences. To ensure balance across the disciplines and to meet core requirements, students may take no more than two courses from any particular discipline toward the requirements of any thematic learning areas of the core. 1

|

C o r e C u r r ic u lu m — S J C B rook ly n

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

PHI 231 Philosophy of Childhood c PHI 235 Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art c PHI 237 The Philosophy of God c PHI 240 American Philosophy c PHI 245 Philosophy and Women c PHI 253 Ancient Philosophy c PHI 254 Medieval Philosophy c PHI 255 Modern Philosophy c PHI 268 Ethics and Business c PHI 270 Philosophy and Film c PHI 335 Aestetics and Ethics of Myth c PHI 345 Social and Political Philosophy c PHI 356 Contemporary Philosophy c PHI 360 Philosophy and Moral Education c PHI 362 Environmental Ethics c PHI 365 Philosophy in the Pre-College Curriculum c RS/HIS 112 Religion in American Life c RS 122 Hebrew Scriptures: Old Testament c RS 123 New Testament c RS 124 Journey With St. Paul c RS 130 Belief and Unbelief in the Modern World c RS 131 Jesus the Christ c RS 134 Sacramental Theology c RS 144 Women in the Judeo-Christian Tradition c RS 145 Theology of Death and Dying c RS 147 Christian Marriage c RS 151 Contemporary Approaches to Morality c RS 154 Issues of War and Peace c RS 164 American Protestantism c RS 165 Judaism c RS 166 Contemporary Catholicism c RS 168 World Religions c RS 173 Quest for God c RS 174 Social Justice and Human Development c RS 200 History of Christian Spirituality­­ c RS 202 Islam c RS 203 Faith on Film c RS 204 Health Care Ethics c RS 205 Religion and Ecology c RS 206 Religions of Abraham c RS 207 The Theory and Practice of Non-Violence c RS 224 History of Christianity I: Beginning to Middle Ages c RS 225 History of Christianity II: Reformation to Modern Christianity c

S t. J o s e p h ’ s Co l l e g e

|

2

GLOBAL PERSPECTIVES

Students are required to take two courses in this area. Rationale: Openness to the exploration and understanding of diverse ideas, traditions and cultures, coupled with an appreciation of problems that transcend national boundaries, will supply students with a strong background for working in a global economy, living in a multicultural society and making intelligent decisions as global citizens. Description: Course offerings in this area are designed to broaden the perspective of the student to include knowledge of world cultures, traditions and peoples facilitated by the study of a range of global topics presented in courses from diverse disciplines. Outcome: Students will develop sufficient cross-cultural literacy to engage effectively the global community with sensitivity and openmindedness. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the world’s peoples and culture — and of the forces that bring peoples and cultures together — and demonstrate the ability to work collaboratively with people of diverse backgrounds. c c c c c c c c

ANT 151 ARA 151 ARA 152 ART 100 ART ART ART ART

103 200 201 202

Cultural Anthropology Elementary Arabic I Elementary Arabic II The Understanding and Appreciation of Art Art and Architecture in Western Europe Art History-Prehistoric Through Medieval Art History-Renaissance Through Impressionism History of Modern Art

ART 205 Art in the Non-Western World BIO 118 Environmental Biology BUS/HIS 244 Food in the Global Community CLA/PHI 154 Sources of Great Western Ideas CLA/HIS/ Self and Society in Ancient Greece PHI 157 and Rome c ECO 120 Macroeconomics c ENG 112 Classical Literature c ENG 113 Introduction to Drama c ENG 114 Introduction to Poetry c ENG 115 The Short Story c ENG/SPN 140 Miracles and Massacres c ENG 218 Medieval Literature c ENG 262 Resonant Voices c ENG 265 Literature and the Environment c FRE 151 Elementary French I c FRE 152 Elementary French II c FRE 201 Intermediate French I c FRE 202 Intermediate French II c HIS 100 Europe to 1715 c HIS 102 Europe since 1715 c HIS 114 Themes in European History (1450-1815) c HIS 115 Themes in European History (1815-1970) c HIS/CLA 122 The Glory That Was Greece: The Grandeur That Was Rome c HIS 152 Contemporary International Problems c HIS/CLA/ Self and Society in Ancient Greece PHI 157 and Rome c HIS 202 The Non-Western World c HIS 210 Modern Sub-Saharan Africa c c c c c

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

3

|

c c c c c c c c c

HIS 220 HIS 224 HIS 225 HIS 232 HIS/BUS 244 HIS 250 HIS 251 HIS 255 HIS 261

East Asia South and Southeast Asia The Making of the Modern Middle East Modern Russia Food in the Global Community Latin America Caribbean History A History of Southern Africa England From the Roman Conquest

to the Glorious Revolution c HIS 266 England Since 1688 c HIS 267 History of Ireland c ITL 151 Elementary Italian I c ITL 152 Elementary Italian II c ITL 201 Intermediate Italian I c ITL 202 Intermediate Italian II c PHI/CLA 154 Sources of Great Western Ideas c PHI/CLA/ Self and Society in Ancient Greece HIS 157 and Rome c PHI 196 The Ancient World c PHI 260 An Inquiry Into Cross-Cultural Guides for Living c PHI 345 Social and Political Philosophy c PHI 362 Environmental Ethics c RS 154 Issues of War c RS 168 The Sacred Quest – A Study of World Religions c RS 174 Social Justice and Human Development c RS 202 Islam c RS 205 Religion and Ecology c RS 206 Religions of Abraham c RS 221 Khatib Course c RS 370 Liberation Theology c RUS 151 Elementary Russian I c RUS 152 Elementary Russian II c SCI 165 Energy and the Environment c SOC 315 Globalization: Understanding Our Interconnected World c SPC 205 Intercultural Communication

c SPN/ENG 140 Miracles and Massacres c SPN 151 Elementary Spanish I c SPN 152 Elementary Spanish II c SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish I c SPN 202 Intermediate Spanish II c SPN 221 Advanced Grammar c SPN 222 Advanced Composition and Conversation c SPN 223 Conversation

c SPN c SPN c SPN c SPN c SPN c SPN c SPN

233 234 260 261 262 263 350

Civilization and Culture of Spain Civilization and Culture of Latin America Introduction to Hispanic Literature Survey of Spanish Literature I Survey of Spanish Literature II Survey of Latin American Literature Hispanic Women Writers

SELF AND SOCIETY

Students are required to take three courses in this area: one history course and two courses from two of the other areas below. Rationale: No woman or man is an island. Each life exists within the wider context of the human community. Moreover, the story of each generation finds its place within the ever unfolding saga of human experience. Description: Course offerings in this area seek to understand the person within these broad communal and temporal horizons. They examine the reciprocal relationship between the individual and society, situating personal dynamics within a study of the prevailing social, political and economic realities and a historical understanding of how those factors came to be. Outcomes: Students will be able to demonstrate familiarity with some basic concepts and methodological principles in at least two of the social and behavioral sciences and will likewise be able to show that they are conversant with certain essential aspects of the historical method and perspective. c CLA/HIS 122 c CLA/HIS/ PHI 157 c CS 101 c CS 102/ PSY 121 c CS 121 c ECO 240 c EDU 115/ PSY 170 c HIS 100 c HIS 102 c HIS/RS 112 c HIS 114 c HIS 115 c HIS/CLA 122 c HIS 152 c HIS/CLA PHI 157 c HIS 170 c HIS 172 c HIS/CLA/ PHI 196 c HIS 202 c HIS 208 c HIS 210 c HIS 220 c HIS 224

The Glory That Was Greece: The Grandeur That Was Rome Self and Society in Ancient Greece and Rome Child Psychology and Development I Child Psychology and Development II Psychology of the Exceptional Child Health Economics Educational Psychology Europe to 1715 Europe since 1715 Religion in American Life Themes in European History (1450-1815) Themes in European History (1815-1970) The Glory That Was Greece: The Grandeur That Was Rome Contemporary International Problems Self and Society in Ancient Greece and Rome American History I American History II The Ancient World The Non-Western World Women and Gender in American History Modern Sub-Saharan Africa East Asia South and Southeast Asia

c HIS 225 c HIS 229 c HIS 232 c HIS 250 c HIS 251 c HIS 255 c HIS 261 c HIS 266 c HIS 267 c HIS 274 c HIS 276 c MAT 241 c PHI/CLA/ HIS 157 c PHI 345 c POL 102 c POL 103 c PSY 100 c PSY 121/ CS 102 c PSY 130 c PSY 150 c PSY 170/ EDU 115 c PSY 180 c RS/HIS 112 c SOC 100 c SOC 133 c SOC 136 c SOC 315

The Making of the Modern Middle East The African-American Experience Modern Russia Latin America Caribbean History A History of Southern Africa England From the Roman Conquest to the Glorious Revolution England Since 1688 History of Ireland Long Island in History History of New York: State and City History of Mathematics Self and Society in Ancient Greece and Rome Social and Political Philosophy Introduction to Political Science American Government and Politics Introduction to Psychology Child Psychology and Development II Life Span Development Group Dynamics and Communication Educational Psychology Psychology of Women Religion in American Life Introductory Sociology American Society Social Problems Globalization Understanding Our Interconnected World



The list of courses above is subject to revision. C o r e C u r r ic u lu m — S J C B rook ly n

S t. J o s e p h ’ s Co l l e g e

|

4

THE MATHEMATICAL, PHYSICAL AND NATURAL WORLD

HUMAN EXPRESSION

Rationale: Understanding our physical and natural world and the ability to think analytically are core components of being an educated person. Hypothesizing and testing the rules that govern the workings of the physical and natural world are the essence of empirical science. Deducing the rules that govern an abstract construct lies at the heart of mathematics. Together, these processes comprise analysis. These important skills can be applied in other disciplines and other aspects of life.

Rationale: Imagination, resourcefulness and the willingness to understand and communicate the human experience through a variety of perspectives and voices are critical capabilities in the modern age.

Students are required to take three courses in this area, including one mathematics course and one lab-science course.

Description: Course offerings in this area invite students to engage in critical thinking and problem solving in the realm of science and mathematics. These courses will provide students with the skills that will enable them to interact effectively with the physical and natural world of the sciences and the abstract world of mathematics. Outcomes: Students will be able to use scientific and inquiry methods when working with mathematics and scientific information and use appropriate mathematical and scientific instruments and technology. They will also develop their ability to solve multi-step problems and construct logical arguments and demonstrate a proficiency in organizing, analyzing, synthesizing and evaluating quantitative and qualitative information. c BIO 108 c BIO 109 c BIO 110 c BIO 112 c BIO 115 c BIO 116 c BIO 118 c BIO 120 c BIO 130 c BIO 131 c BIO 140 c BIO 145 c BIO 150 c BIO 151 c BIO 160 c BIO 161 c BIO 225 c CHE 120 c CHE 135 c CHE 140 c CHE 150 c CHE 151 c CHE 175 c COM 150 c COM 152 c COM 200

Introduction to Ecology Current Trends in Biology Current Topics in Biology Biological Control Systems Introduction to Human Inheritance Evolving Life Environmental Biology Healing Power of Plants Introduction to Immunology Immunological Exploration The Microbial World Marine Biology General Biology I General Biology II Anatomy and Physiology I Anatomy and Physiology II Forensic Bioscience Chemistry and Society Introduction to Environmental Chemistry Introduction to Chemistry and Art General Chemistry I General Chemistry II Principles of General, Organic and Biochemistry Introduction to Computer Programming Computer Programming Computer Science: An Overview

c ESC 110 c ESC 111

Introduction to Astronomy Introduction to the Solar System

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

c ESC 112 c ESC 113 c ESC 120 c ESC 130 c MAT 105 c MAT 106 c MAT 107 c MAT 111 c MAT 113 c MAT 200 c MAT 203 c MAT 204 c MAT 205 c MAT 206 c MAT 207 c MAT 208 c MAT 360 c PHY 150 c PHY 151 c SCI 125 c SCI 130 c SCI 135 c SCI 150 c SCI 165

Introduction to Stellar Astronomy Science in Science Fiction Introduction to Geology Introduction to Meteorology Fundamentals of Mathematics in Today’s World Excursions in Contemporary Mathematics Introduction to Probability and Statistics College Algebra Elementary Functions: Precalculus Mathematics for Business and Economics Mathematical Foundation of Computer Science Analytical Trigonometry and Geometry Calculus and Analytical Geometry I Calculus and Analytical Geometry II Calculus and Analytical Geometry III Advanced Calculus Optimization Methods General Physics I – Mechanics, Molecular Physics, Heat, Sound General Physics II – Magnetism, Electricity, Optics, Atomic Physics An Investigation Into Forensic Science Chemistry and Nutrition Chemistry in Nutrition and Personal Health Introduction to Physical Science Energy and the Environment

Students are required to take two courses in this area.

Description: Course offerings in this area develop an understanding of humankind through a wide range of literary, cultural and aesthetic expressions. Students will also acquire skills to express themselves artistically and verbally and to appreciate the range of artistic expression throughout the human community. Outcome: Students will demonstrate an ability to articulate their views and ideas creatively and will develop an understanding and appreciation of the diversity of such creative expressions. c ART 100 c ART 103 c ART 104 c ART 105 c ART 185 c ART 196 c ART 200 c ART 201 c ART 202 c ART 205 c ART 215 c ART 220 c ART 225 c ART 227 c DAN 101 c DAN 103 c DAN 201 c ENG 105 c ENG 106 c ENG 107 c ENG 111 c MUS 100 c MUS 101 c MUS 104 c MUS 113 c MUS 115 c MUS 201 c MUS 205 c MUS 206 c MUS 207 c MUS 208 c MUS 209 c MUS 210 c MUS 211 c MUS 212 c MUS 213

The Understanding and Appreciation of Art Art and Architecture in Western Europe Art and Architecture: A World View The Visual Arts in a Global World Art as Communication The Ancient World Art History-Prehistoric Through Medieval Art History-Renaissance Through Impressionism History of Modern Art Art in the Non-Western World Art in American Life History of Women Artists History of Photography Issues in Visual Culture Techniques and Sources of Modern Dance Dance Through the Ages Techniques and Sources of Modern Dance II Creative Writing Dramatic and Visual Writing Fiction Writing Language of Film The Understanding and Enjoyment of Music Theory I Evolution of American Music Great Figures in Music Survey of European Classical Music Theory II Jazz The Opera Twentieth Century Music The Classical Era (1750-1820) The Baroque Era (1600-1750) The Romantic Era Development of Music in the Motion Pictures I Latin American Music Development of Music in the Motion Pictures II

c MUS 214 c MUS 215 c MUS 216 c MUS 217 c MUS 218 c MUS 226 c MUS 308 c MUS 310 c PHI 235 c SPC 102

Postmodern Music History of the Symphony Latin American Music II Music in Paris Music in China Music in Therapeutic Settings Mozart Beethoven Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art Speech Communication

c SPC 112 c SPC 115 c SPC 130 c SPC 132 c SPC 204 c SPC 205 c SPC 206 c SPC 208 c SPC 217 c SPC 218 c SPC 222 c SPC 224 c SPC 225 c SPC 228 c SPC 229 c SPC 230 c SPC 234 c SPC 235 c SPC 270 c SPN 211 c SPN 212 c SPN 215 c SPN 260 c SPN 261 c SPN 262 c SPN 263 c SPN 350

Introduction to Sign Language Voice and Diction Introduction to Theatre Fundamentals of Acting Interpersonal Communication Intercultural Communication Business and Professional Communication Listening Theories and Applications Oral Interpretation of Children’s Literature Normal Language Development Nonverbal Communication Children’s Literature and Oral Expression Psychology of Language Acting I Acting II Advanced Acting Creative Drama Workshop Play Production Small Group Discussion Readings in Spanish Literature and Culture Readings in Latin American Literature and Culture Studies in Hispanic Literature and Art Introduction to Hispanic Literature Survey of Spanish Literature I Survey of Spanish Literature II Survey of Latin American Literature Hispanic Women Writers

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

5

|

C o r e C u r r i c u l um — S J C Brook ly n

S t. J o s e p h ’ s Co l l e g e

|

6

INTEGRATED LEARNING AREAS

TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATED

Students will complete one experience in this area. Each experience will include at least three technology areas.

Students entering St. Joseph’s College in fall 2015 must complete at least four integrated learning areas.

Rationale: Technology touches every aspect of our lives and enables us to interact globally as well as locally. A well-educated person needs technological skills to continue to learn, communicate, excel and to be productive in an ever-evolving digital world.

In support of the College’s mission to provide a strong academic and value-oriented education, the St. Joseph’s College core curriculum includes courses and experiences in five integrated learning areas. These areas are designed to build intellectual skills and abilities (Writing Intensive and Technology Integrated), enhance the connections among and between the various academic disciplines and cocurricular life (Learning Communities and Service and Experiential Learning), and foster an environment of openness to the exploration and understanding of diverse ideas, traditions and cultures (Diversity Integrated).

Description: Course offerings and experiences in this area will develop the students’ ability to adapt, navigate and become proficient in at least three of these technological areas: communication and collaboration, creativity and innovation, critical thinking, problem solving, decision making, digital citizenship, technology concepts and digital tools.1 These areas are fluid in nature and thus students’ experiences will reflect the constantly changing technologies, applications and systems in our global society.

Students can fulfill the requirements of these integrated learning areas through courses in the thematic areas of the core, the major or electives, as well as through certain approved cocurricular activities.

WRITING INTENSIVE

Students are required to complete two courses in this area, including one before the senior year. ENG 103 does not satisfy this requirement. Rationale: Given the multiple ways students use writing to communicate, we believe that teaching writing across a range of practices — academic, creative and professional — should encourage students to understand the role writing plays in academic life and beyond. Description: Course offerings and experiences in this area will shape students into strong writers by developing their critical and creative reading, thinking and writing abilities associated with expression and composition. Outcome: In addition to improving basic writing skills, students will be able to use writing and reading for critical thinking and creative expression. c ART 225 History of Photography c BIO 110 Topics in Biology (Brooklyn sections only) c BIO 380 Research Seminar c BIO 480 Research c BUS 472 Business Policy Seminar c CHE 240 Scientific Writing and Research c CHE 460 Senior Project c CS 323 Children With Learning Disabilities (Brooklyn sections only) c CS 400 Research in Child Development and Childhood Education c ECO 400 Seminar in Economics c ENG 105 Creative Writing c ENG 106 Drama and Visual Writing c ENG 107 Fiction Writing c ENG 109 Analytical Writing c ENG 110 Communication for Professionals c ENG 125 Introduction to Magazine Writing c ENG 202 Literature/Writing Process c ENG 203 Advanced Expository Writing

c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c c

ENG 213 ENG 214 ENG 234 ENG 278 ENG 300 ENG 332 ENG 370 ENG 487 HIS 327 HIS 411 HR 400 JNM 108 MKT 472 NU 221 PHI 231 PHI 253 POL 400 PSY 392 PSY 460 SOC 400

Film Media and Society (certain sections only) Film/Media Form Victorian Prose and Poetry Brooklyn Voices Scholarly Writing Shakespeare (certain sections only) Special Topics Senior Thesis Revolutionary America Senior Thesis Seminar in Human Relations Journalism Marketing Strategy Seminar Evidence-Based Practice & Nursing Research Philosophy of Childhood Ancient Philosophy Seminar in Political Science Research Methods in Psychology (with lab) Senior Research Seminar Seminar in Sociology

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

Outcome: In addition to developing their basic technological skills (e.g., using email, word processing and presentation tools, researching, etc.), students will be able to demonstrate critical and technological thinking to locate, organize, create, evaluate, analyze, synthesize and ethically utilize information from a multiplicity of sources and media. ART 165 ART 267 ART 269 ART 277 ART 377/ JNM 410 c BIO 225 c BIO 430 c BIO 440 c BIO 450 c BIO 460 c BIO 461 c BIO 462 c BIO 470 c BIO 475 c BUS/ COM 140 c BUS/ COM 141 c BUS/ COM 288 c BUS/ ECO 222 c CHE 260 c CJ 271 c CJ 272 c COM 115 c c c c c

c COM/ BUS 140 c COM/ BUS 141 c COM 150 c COM 152 c COM 200 c COM 205 c COM 210

Graphic Design I Computer Assisted Graphic Design Workshop Digital Photography Web Design Web Design Workshop Forensic Bioscience Conservation Biology Analysis of Developmental Biology Endocrinology Cell Biology Molecular Biology Neuroscience Coastal Marine Habitats Molecular Immunology Microcomputer Applications I Microcomputer Applications II Business Systems and Design Statistics Analytical Chemistry Computer Applications in Criminal Justice Geographic Information Systems Exploring the Internet Microcomputer Applications I Microcomputer Applications II Introduction to Computer Programming Computer Programming Computer Science: An Overview Multimedia Applications Algorithms and Data Structures

COM 230 Software Engineering and Methodology COM 249 Computer Organization and Assembly Language COM 252 Advanced C++ COM 260 Computer and Information Security COM 288/ Business Systems & Design BUS 288 c COM 300 Advanced Algorithms c COM 310 Operating Systems c COM 320 Programming Languages c COM 330 Computer Graphics c COM 360 Computer Communications and Networking c COM 370 Advanced Computer Programming c COM 380 Database Systems c COM 390 Advanced Application Programming and Database Systems c CS 302 Literacy and Language in the Intermediate Grades (Brooklyn sections only) c CS 325 Special Ed: Curric. Methods, Materials II c ECO/ Statistics BUS 222 c EDU 115/ Educational Psychology (certain sections only) PSY 170 c EDU 240 Literacy for Adolescents c HIS 170 American History I (certain sections only) c HIS 335 The American Civil War and Reconstruction c JNM 210 Digital Reporting c JNM 310 New Media Workshop c c c c c

c JNM 311 c JNM 410/ ART 377 c MAT 205 c PHI 160 c PSY 170/ EDU 115 c PSY 316 c SOC 350

Infographics and Data-Driven Jouralism Web Design Workshop Calculus and Analytical Geometry I Introduction to Ethics (certain sections only) Educational Psychology (certain sections only) Stats with Behavioral Sciences (with lab) Applied Statistics

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

Course Semester

Course Semester

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

1 Adapted from the National Educational Technology Standards for Students, Second Edition, ©2007, ISTE®

7

|

C o r e C u r r i c u l um — S J C Brook ly n

(International Society for Technology in Education), www.iste.org. All rights reserved.

S t. J o s e p h ’ s Co l l e g e

|

8

SJC LEARNING COMMUNITIES

SERVICE AND EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Students will complete one experience in this area.

Students will complete one experience in this area.

Rationale: Achieving our goals often requires that we exchange ideas with others, have successful interactions and know how to move forward with others in a constructive way. Whether one is in the field of academia, endeavoring to be an active citizen or developing a career, the ability to learn from and with others is an important skill. Shared learning experiences provide a framework for engaging the social and collaborative nature of knowledge.

Rationale: Connecting academic work to experiences outside the classroom will provide students with opportunities to practice and apply theoretical constructs, ideas and skills that foster professional and personal intellectual maturity. Description: Course offerings or activities in this area may include a variety of options designed to supplement and complement the purely academic and theoretical. Structured experiences will encourage educational interaction and participation in supervised and collaborative ventures that will identify specific learning goals that promote the development of knowledge, skills and dispositions associated with the liberal arts and the professions.

Description: Course offerings in this area emphasize cooperative learning experiences that link courses, curricular material, faculty or student with the aim of promoting deep learning and engagement with other members of the College community.

Outcomes: Students will learn the value of service and/or experiential learning through interactive experiences and reflections within real-world contexts. These experiences will encourage students to forge a link between theory and practice while clarifying students’ connections to their local and global communities. Students will thus come to recognize the value of and need for ongoing inquiry, analysis and evaluation.

Outcomes: Students will demonstrate an appreciation of how interdisciplinary and community learning experiences contribute to the integration of knowledge, enhance the value of a liberal arts education and offer deeper understanding of the material they are learning through more interaction with one another and their teachers as fellow participants in the learning enterprise. BIO 150/CHE 150 BIO/MED TECH c BUS/HIS 244 c CS 423 c CS 424 c ENG 103/SJC 100

General Bio I & General Chem I (student in same section) Clinical Hospital Training I Food in the Global Community Special Education Student Teaching (Brooklyn sections only) Special Education Student Teaching (L.I. sections only) Writing for Effective Communication/Freshman Seminar (student in same section, Brooklyn sections only) c ENG/SPN 140 Miracles and Massacres c HIS/RS 112 Religion in American Life c HIS 335 American Civil War & Reconstruction c MAT 471 Seminar c NU 370 Population Focused Care in Professional Nursing c REC 252/REC 253 Recreation Admin. I & II (students completing both courses) c RS 221 Khatib Course c RS 370/PSY 330 Psychology, Religion & Quest for Meaning c RS 370/PSY 330 Special Topics c RS/SPN 352 Latin America at the Crossroads c SJC 100/ENG 103 Freshman Seminar/Writing for Effective Communication (student in same section, Brooklyn sections only) c

c

c

Co-curricular Opportunities c L.I. Honors Program c B.K. Honors Program The list of courses above is subject to revision.

Course/Experience Semester

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________

c c c c c c

ACC 362 ART 103 ART 105 BIO 279 BIO 280 BIO 400 BUS 362

Internship in Accounting Art and Architecture in Western Europe The Visual Arts in a Global World Local Field Ecology Field Course in Ecology Internship Internship in Business

CHE 410 Internship c CJ 342 Internship in Criminal Justice c CLA/HIS/ Self and Society in Ancient Greece PHI 157 and Rome c COM 498 Internship in Computer Information Technology c CS 301 Literacy and Language in the Primary Grades (L.I. sections only) c CS 413 Supervised Student Teaching (Brooklyn sections only) c EDU 473 Supervised Student Teaching in Secondary Schools c ENG 199 Supervised Internship c ENG/ Women Writing Resistance SPA 370 c HIS/CLA/ Self and Society in Ancient Greece PHI 157 and Rome c HIS 350 Holocaust c HIS 370 Oral History and Veteran Experience c HTM 462 Internship c JNM 435 Supervised Internship c MedTech Clinical I and II c PHI/CLA/ Self and Society in Ancient Greece HIS 157 and Rome c POL 290 Action Program in Political Science c POL 295 Internship in Political Science c



c c c c c

PSY 400 PSY 405 REC 483 REC 486 REC 487

c

REC 488

Internship in Psychology Internship Research Therapeutic Field Experience I Leisure Service Management Internship Therapeutic Recreation Internship Experience (not eligible for certification) Internship in Therapeutic Recreation

RS 174 Social Justice and Human Development (specified service learning sections) c RS 205 Religion and Ecology (specified service learning sections) c RS/ Latin America at the Crossroads SPN 352 c RS 370/ Special Topics PSY 330 c SPN/ENG 370 Women Writing Resistence c SOC 241 Experience in Social Work c SOC 242 Internship in Applied Sociology c SPC 234 Creative Drama Workshop c SPC 400 Internships c SPC 424 Clinical Procedure and Practice c SPN/ Latin America at the Crossroads RS 352 c SPN 358 The City of Borges c

Co-curricular Opportunities c Biology Summer Research Programs c Costa Rica Study Experience (L.I. Campus) c Dean’s Circle (L.I.) c Honors Travel Event (L.I.) c Math Clinic (L.I.) c The SJC Student Leadership Experience

The list of courses above is subject to revision.

Course/experience Semester ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

9

|

C o r e C u r r i c u l um — S J C Brook ly n

S t. J o s e p h ’ s Co l l e g e

|

10

DIVERSITY INTEGRATED

Students will complete one experience in this area. Rationale: The liberal arts tradition should prepare students for lives of integrity, social responsibility and service, in an environment that acknowledges the worth of all individuals, values cooperation and incorporates the diverse concerns of dissenting voices. This core requirement prepares students to understand more fully issues and questions raised by living in a diverse society. Description: Course offerings in this area are designed to incorporate elements related to a variety of human differences; explore the differences among various groups and forms of human expression in our society; and examine the richness and strengths of complex, heterogeneous societies, while confronting the intolerance, inequality and conflict that often accompany diversity. Courses will, in a substantial and rigorous manner, analyze topics and issues related to these aspects of diversity throughout the course. Outcome: Students will be able to articulate the contributions and challenges of diverse peoples. They will demonstrate an understanding of critical issues pertaining to diversity and will be able to recognize and scrutinize the way institutional power structures influence such phenomena as marginalization and oppression as well as social and economic integration. c ART 163 Crafts as an Art Form

c PSY 180

c ART 220 Women in the History of Art

c REC 284 Therapeutic Recreation/Community-based Settings

c Art 377/

c SOC 245 Community and the Built Environment

Web Design Workshop

JNM 410

Psychology of Women

c SOC 247 Hispanic Culture and Community

c CJ 247

Correctional Rehabilitation and Re-entry

c SOC 249 Race and Ethnicity

c CJ 248

Women and Crime

c SOC 310 The Civil Rights Movement

c CS 121

Psychology of the Exceptional Child

c SOC 315 Globalization: Understanding Our

c ENG 119 Rainbow of Voices



c ENG 140/ Miracles and Massacres

c SPC 205 Intercultural Communications

SPN 140 c HIS 202

Interconnected World

c SPC 350 Hispanic Women Writers The Non-Western World

c JNM 410/ Web Design Workshop ART 277

c SPN 110 Introduction to Latino Studies c SPN/

Miracles and Massacres

ENG 140

c PHI 260

An Inquiry into Cross Cultural Guides for Living

c SPN 233 Civilization and Culture of Spain

c PHI 335

Aesthetics and Ethics of Myth

c SPN 234 Civilization and Culture of Latin America

c POL 103 American Government and Politics

c SPN 330 U.S. Latino Literature and Culture

c POL 203 Political and Civil Rights

c SPN 355 Beyond Walls: U.S.-Mexico Borderlands

c POL 280 Constitutional Law

c SPN 356 Deconstructing the Caribbean

c POL 285 The Supreme Court The list of courses above is subject to revision.

Course Semester ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________

11

|

C o r e C u r r i c u l u m — S J C Brook ly n