CHAPTER 13: Evidence of Evolution

3/24/2014 CHAPTER 13: Evidence of Evolution BIO 121 Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules Life on Earth arose 3.8 bil...
Author: Edmund Hall
2 downloads 0 Views 981KB Size
3/24/2014

CHAPTER 13: Evidence of Evolution BIO 121

Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules Life on Earth arose 3.8 billion years  ago. Changes in body structures  and molecules have slowly  accumulated through that time,  producing the variety of organisms  we see today.

Section 13.1

Figure 13.2

Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules Scientists use the geologic  timescale to divide the history of  the Earth into eons and eras. These  periods are defined by major  geological or biological events, like  mass extinctions.

Section 13.1

Figure 13.2

1

3/24/2014

Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules

Even though the events that led to  today’s diversity of life occurred in  the past, many clues suggest that  all organisms derived from a  common ancestor. 

Section 13.1

Ge Sun, et al. "In Search of the First Flower: A Jurassic Angiosperm, Archaefructus, from Northeast China," Science, Vol. 282, no. 5394, November 27, 1998, pp. 1601-1772. ©1998 AAAS. All rights reserved. Used with permission.

Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules

Researchers analyze fossils,  anatomy, and molecular sequences  to learn how species are related to  one another. 

Section 13.1

Ge Sun, et al. "In Search of the First Flower: A Jurassic Angiosperm, Archaefructus, from Northeast China," Science, Vol. 282, no. 5394, November 27, 1998, pp. 1601-1772. ©1998 AAAS. All rights reserved. Used with permission

Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules

Paleontology is the study of fossil  remains or other clues to past life.  Fossils provided the original  evidence for evolution.  

Section 13.1

Ge Sun, et al. "In Search of the First Flower: A Jurassic Angiosperm, Archaefructus, from Northeast China," Science, Vol. 282, no. 5394, November 27, 1998, pp. 1601-1772. ©1998 AAAS. All rights reserved. Used with permission

2

3/24/2014

Clues to Evolution Lie in the Earth,  Body Structures, and Molecules Fossils are the remains of ancient organisms. 

Section 13.1

Left fossil: Ge Sun, et al. "In Search of the First Flower: A Jurassic Angiosperm, Archaefructus, from Northeast China," Science, Vol. 282, no. 5394, November 27, 1998, pp. 1601-1772. ©1998 AAAS. All rights reserved. Used with permission; Wood: ©PhotoLink/Getty Images RF; Embryo: ©University of the Witwatersrand/epa/Corbis; Coprolite: ©Sinclair Stammers/Science Source; Trilobite: ©Siede Preis/Getty Images RF; Fish fossil: ©Phil Degginger/Carnegie Museum/Alamy RF; Leaf fossil: ©Biophoto Associates/Science Source; Triceratops: ©Francois Gohier/Science Source

Figure 13.1

Fossils Record Evolution Fossils form in many ways.

Section 13.2

Compression fossil of leaf: ©William E. Ferguson Human skull and bone fossil: ©John Reader/Science Source

Figure 13.4

Fossils Record Evolution Fossils form in many ways.

Section 13.2

Impression of dinosaur skin: ©Dr. John D. Cunningham/Visuals Unlimited Horn coral: ©Robert Gossington/Photoshot

Figure 13.4

3

3/24/2014

Fossils Record Evolution Fossils form in many ways.

Section 13.2

Mosquito trapped in amber: ©Natural Visions/Alamy

Figure 13.4

Fossils Record Evolution Even though fossil evidence is diverse, it is often challenging— or impossible—to find fossils of transitional forms  between groups. 

Section 13.2

Ammonite: ©Jean-Claude Carton/Photoshot

Figure 13.3

Fossils Record Evolution The fossil record is incomplete, partly because some organisms  (such as those with soft bodies) fail to fossilize. Also, erosion  and movement of Earth’s plates might destroy fossils.  

Section 13.2

Ammonite: ©Jean-Claude Carton/Photoshot

Figure 13.3

4

3/24/2014

Fossils Record Evolution Still, fossils help researchers piece together Earth’s history.  For example, these marine fossils from landlocked Oklahoma  show that water once covered the central United States.

Section 13.2

Ammonite: ©Jean-Claude Carton/Photoshot

Figure 13.3

Fossils Record Evolution Dating fossils yields clues about the timeline of life’s history. 

Section 13.2

Canyon: ©Terry Moore/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images RF

Figure 12.3

Fossils Record Evolution The simpler, and less precise, method of dating fossils is  relative dating, which assumes that lower rock layers  have older fossils than newer layers. 

Section 13.2

Canyon: ©Terry Moore/Stocktrek Images/Getty Images RF

Figure 12.3

5

3/24/2014

Fossils Record Evolution Absolute dating uses chemistry to determine  how long ago a fossil formed. 

Section 13.2

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Figure 13.6

Fossils Record Evolution Radiometric dating is a type of absolute dating  that uses radioactive isotopes. 

Section 13.2

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Figure 13.6

Fossils Record Evolution Throughout life, organisms accumulate carbon‐14,  a radioactive isotope, along with stable carbon‐12. 

Section 13.2

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Figure 13.6

6

3/24/2014

Fossils Record Evolution Living organisms have a constant amount of carbon‐14  in their tissues. 

Section 13.2

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Figure 13.6

Fossils Record Evolution After the organism dies, no more carbon‐12 or carbon‐14  is added.  

Section 13.2

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Figure 13.6

Fossils Record Evolution However, carbon‐14 decays at a constant rate,  leaving the organism as nitrogen. 

Section 13.2

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Figure 13.6

7

3/24/2014

Fossils Record Evolution During any 5730‐year period, the amount of carbon‐14  in the organism divides in half.   In other words, the half‐life of carbon‐14 is 5730 years.

Section 13.2

Figure 13.6

Woolly mammoth skeleton: ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Fossils Record Evolution By determining the amount of carbon‐14 in a fossil,  scientists can estimate when the organism lived. 

Section 13.2

Figure 13.6

Woolly mammoth skeleton; ©Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Question #1 Which rock layer (A, B, or C) should have  fossils with the most carbon‐14?

A

B C

8

3/24/2014

ANSWER Which rock layer (A, B, or C) should have  fossils with the most carbon‐14?

A

B C

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations Earth’s geography has changed drastically over  the last 200 million years. 

Section 13.3

Figure 13.7

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations These images represent only about 5% of Earth’s history.  (Scientists hypothesize that this cycle has occurred several times.)

Section 13.3

Figure 13.7

9

3/24/2014

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations Why do the continents move?  

Section 13.3

Figure 13.7

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations According to the theory of plate tectonics,  Earth’s surface consists  of several rigid layers, called tectonic plates, that  move in response to forces acting deep within the planet. 

Section 13.3

Figure 13.7

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations Earthquakes and volcanoes are evidence that  Earth’s plates continue to move today.

Section 13.3

Figure 13.7

10

3/24/2014

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations Fossils help geographers piece together Earth’s continents  into Pangaea. 

Section 13.3

Figure 13.8

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations

Biogeography sheds light  on evolutionary events.

Section 13.3

Figure 13.9

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations

Animals on either side of  Wallace’s line have been  separated for millions of  years, evolving  independently. 

Section 13.3

Figure 13.9

11

3/24/2014

Biogeography Considers Species’  Geographical Locations

The result is a unique  variety of organisms on  each side of the line.  

Section 13.3

Figure 13.9

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent Investigators  often look for  anatomical  features to  determine the  evolutionary  relationship of  two organisms.

Section 13.4

Figure 13.10

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

Two structures are  homologous if the  similarities  between them  reflect common  ancestry.

Section 13.4

Figure 13.10

12

3/24/2014

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

All of these  animals, for  example, have  similar bones in  their forelimbs. 

Section 13.4

Figure 13.10

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

These similarities  suggests that their  common ancestor  had this bone  configuration. 

Section 13.4

Figure 13.10

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

Homologous  structures need  not have the same  function or look  exactly alike. 

Section 13.4

Figure 13.10

13

3/24/2014

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

Different selective  pressures in each  animal’s  evolutionary line  have led to small  changes from their  ancestor’s bone  structure.

Section 13.4

Figure 13.10

Homologous Structures

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

A vestigial structure has lost  its function but is  homologous to a functional  structure in another species.

Section 13.4

Mexican-boa-constrictor: ©Pascal Goetgheluck/Science Source Python skeleton: ©Science VU/Visuals Unlimited

Figure 13.11

14

3/24/2014

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

Vestigial hind limbs in some  snake species and pelvises in  whales are evidence of  these organisms’ ancestors. 

Section 13.4

Mexican-boa-constrictor: ©Pascal Goetgheluck/Science Source Python skeleton: ©Science VU/Visuals Unlimited

Figure 13.11

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

Anatomical structures are  analogous if they are  superficially similar but did  not derive from a common  ancestor.   Section 13.4

Salamander: ©Francesco Tomasinelli/The Lighthouse/Visuals Unlimited Crayfish: ©Dante Fenolio/Science Source

Figure 13.13

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

None of these cave animals  has pigment or eyes. 

Section 13.4

Salamander: ©Francesco Tomasinelli/The Lighthouse/Visuals Unlimited Crayfish: ©Dante Fenolio/Science Source

Figure 13.13

15

3/24/2014

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

These similarities arose by  convergent evolution, which  produces similar structures  in organisms that don’t  share the same lineage.  Section 13.4

Salamander: ©Francesco Tomasinelli/The Lighthouse/Visuals Unlimited Crayfish: ©Dante Fenolio/Science Source

Figure 13.13

Anatomical Relationships Reveal  Common Descent

Lack of pigment arose  independently in each of these  cave animals.

Section 13.4

Salamander: ©Francesco Tomasinelli/The Lighthouse/Visuals Unlimited Crayfish: ©Dante Fenolio/Science Source

Figure 13.13

Question #3 The streamlined shapes of dolphins and  sharks evolved independently. The body  plan of these two animals are A. homologous. B. vestigial. C. analogous. D. a product of convergent evolution. E. Both C and D are correct.

16

3/24/2014

ANSWER The streamlined shapes of dolphins and  sharks evolved independently. The body  plan of these two animals are A. homologous. B. vestigial. C. analogous. D. a product of convergent evolution. E. Both C and D are correct.

Flower: © Doug Sherman/Geofile/RF

Embryonic Development Patterns  Provide Evolutionary Clues Anatomical similarities are often  most obvious in embryos. Notice  how much more similar human  and chimpanzee skull structure  is in fetuses compared to in  adults.

Section 13.5

Figure 13.14

Embryonic Development Patterns  Provide Evolutionary Clues Adult fish, mice, and alligators have very different bodies.  Their evolutionary relationships are more obvious in embryos.

Section 13.5

Fish: ©Dr. Richard Kessel/Visuals Unlimited; Mouse: ©Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source; Alligator: USGS/Southeast Ecological Science Center

Figure 13.15

17

3/24/2014

Embryonic Development Patterns  Provide Evolutionary Clues How do similar embryos develop into such different organisms?  Homeotic genes provide a clue.

Section 13.5

Fish: ©Dr. Richard Kessel/Visuals Unlimited; Mouse: ©Steve Gschmeissner/Science Source; Alligator: USGS/Southeast Ecological Science Center

Figure 13.15

Embryonic Development Patterns  Provide Evolutionary Clues Homeotic genes control an organism’s development.  Small differences in gene expression might make the difference  between a limbed and limbless organism. 

Section 13.5

Figure 13.16

Embryonic Development Patterns  Provide Evolutionary Clues Homeotic genes therefore help explain how a few key mutations  might produce new species. 

Section 13.5

Figure 13.16

18

3/24/2014

Embryonic Development Patterns  Provide Evolutionary Clues Mutations in segments of DNA  that do not encode proteins  also produce new phenotypes.

Section 13.5

Figure 13.17

Molecules Reveal Relatedness

Comparing DNA and protein  sequences determines evolutionary  relationships in unprecedented detail.  

Section 13.6

Molecules Reveal Relatedness

It is highly unlikely that two unrelated  species would evolve precisely the  same DNA and protein sequences by  chance. 

Section 13.6

19

3/24/2014

Molecules Reveal Relatedness

It is more likely that the similarities  were inherited from a common  ancestor and that differences arose by mutation after the species  diverged from the ancestral type.

Section 13.6

Molecules Reveal Relatedness

Cytochrome c is a mitochondrial  protein that is often used in molecular  comparisons. 

Section 13.6

Figure 13.19

Molecules Reveal Relatedness

The more amino acid differences  between species, the more distant the  common ancestor. 

Section 13.6

Figure 13.19

20

3/24/2014

Molecules Reveal Relatedness Molecular clocks assign dates to evolutionary events. 

Section 13.6

Figure 13.20

Molecules Reveal Relatedness If a gene is estimated to mutate once every 25 million years,  then two differences from an ancestor might arise in  50 million years. 

Section 13.6

Figure 13.20

Molecules Reveal Relatedness If a gene is estimated to mutate once every 25 million years,  then two differences from an ancestor might arise in  50 million years. 

Section 13.6

Figure 13.20

21

3/24/2014

Molecules Reveal Relatedness If a gene is estimated to mutate once every 25 million years,  then two differences from an ancestor might arise in  50 million years. 

Section 13.6

Figure 13.20

Molecules Reveal Relatedness Therefore, two species that derived from the same  common ancestor 50 MYA might have four differences  in the nucleotide sequence of the gene.  

Section 13.6

Figure 13.20

22