Capital Markets Perspective

Capital Markets Perspective © Energy & Multi-Site Retail Group Volume 3  Issue 1       Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership  February 201...
1 downloads 0 Views 620KB Size
Capital Markets Perspective

©

Energy & Multi-Site Retail Group

Volume 3  Issue 1

      Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

February 2014

  Thomas E. Kelso, Managing Director & Principal  Cedric C. Fortemps, CFA, Managing Director & Principal  Stephen C. Lynch, CPA, Associate       Introduction   

One  of  the  most  frequently  discussed  topics  in  our  industry  over  the  last  couple  of  years  has  been  Master  Limited Partnerships (“MLPs”), and in particular, the role that MLPs play in M & A activity and valuations.  Our  goal  in  this  issue  is  to  try  and  demystify  the  MLP  through  discussion  of  what  MLPs  are  (and  aren’t)  and  how  valuations are affected by MLPs both in current terms and prospectively.  We have also analyzed certain existing  MLPs and created a series of proprietary charts and graphs, which we will introduce in this issue.     

What is an MLP?   

MLPs are publicly traded partnerships, defined under section 7704 of the Internal Revenue Code, which have a  partnership’s flow‐through taxation characteristics, an LLC’s limited liability, and a public corporation’s liquidity  and access to capital markets. To qualify for MLP treatment, the entity must generate 90 percent of its income  from qualifying activities.     Qualifying income includes the following:     Income  from  the  exploration,  production,  mining,  processing,  refining,  storage,  transportation,  or  marketing of natural resources such as oil, gas, coal, and renewable fuels among others   Downstream  income  from  refineries,  storage  facilities,  distribution  of  fuels  to  retail  and  wholesale  customers, and transportation of fuels to non‐retail customers by pipeline, barge, rail, and truck   Any real property rental income, interest income not from insurance or financial businesses, dividends,  and commodity derivative income    The  income  generated  from  sales  to  the  retail  customer  from  operating  retail  gas  stations  and  convenience  stores is not considered qualifying income.    Under a typical partnership agreement, an MLP is required to distribute to its unitholders all of its available cash.   However, the board of directors has discretion in determining the amount of cash that can be distributed based  on  forecasted  maintenance  capital  expenditure  needs,  required  liquidity  to  operate,  and  its  definition  of  "sustainable" cash flow. 

   

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  2

  MLP Structure & Ownership    MLPs are typically owned by two types of partners; Limited Partners (“LPs”) and General Partners (“GPs”).    General Partners:   Manage  the  operations  of  the  MLP  and  are  usually  selected  by  the  company  that  spun‐off  the  MLP  (“Sponsor”)   Under  most  structures,  receive  Incentive  Distribution  Rights  (IDRs),  which  entitles  the  GP  to  a  larger  share  of  the  MLP’s  distributions  as  the  MLP’s  performance  and  distributable  cash  flows  improve  over  time. These are analogous to employee stock options       Limited Partners:   Are passive investors in the MLP and  are called unitholders, which are analogous to shareholders in a  corporation   After GPs have received an allocation to cover operating costs, LPs are usually paid Minimum Quarterly  Distributions  (MQDs), which are outlined in the  MLP’s prospectus and are similar to a dividend  that  C  Corporations  pay,  without  the  double  taxation  of  the  earnings  and  distributions  that  C  Corporations  face.  An MLP’s unit value would significantly decline if it failed to pay its MQDs    LPs have limited liability from claims against the MLP, but usually have little say in corporate governance  issues    In  a  typical  MLP  formation  process,  a  Sponsor  owns  assets  that  generate  qualifying  income  and  chooses  to  contribute some or all of its assets into an MLP.   The Sponsor retains control of the management of the MLP by  owning the General Partner interests (typically 2.0% of the MLP) and also owns typically 49% of the MLP units  (which  are  initially  classified  as  “subordinated  units”),  while  the  other  49%  of  the  MLP  units  are  sold  to  the  public (common units or LP units).  During the subordination period, which is a period of time that can last from  three  to  five  years  in  which  units  held  by  the  public  receive  preferential  treatment  over  those  held  by  the  Sponsor,  the  public  unitholders  receive  protections  that  entitle  them  to  receive  the  minimum  quarterly  distribution amounts set in the offering.  In other words, the Sponsor’s subordinated units may not receive any  distributions until the minimum quarterly distribution has been made to all of the public unitholders.  However,  if certain distribution targets are made, the subordination period can actually be less than three years.  Once the  subordination period is over, the Sponsor can convert its subordinated units into common units.  The diagram  below illustrates the typical MLP structure and provides an example structure of IDRs for the General Partner.     

   

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  3

  MLP Taxation    At the MLP entity level, an MLP is a flow‐through entity that pays no corporate tax.    At  the  MLP  Unitholder  Level,  each  common  unitholder  gets  their  proportionate  share  of  income,  gains,  deductions, losses, and credits in a Schedule K‐1, which is notorious for being complex, arriving late in the tax  season, and requiring state returns for everywhere the MLP operates.  However, an investor would need to be a  large  unitholder  to  generate  enough  state  specific  income  to  file  a  state  return,  while  states  such  as  Texas,  Nevada, Wyoming, and South Dakota have no state income tax, and states such as Virginia require state income  of $3,000 or more to be subject to state taxes.      The  investor’s  share  of  income  is  taxed  at  the  investor’s  marginal  rate.    An  MLP  investment  is  usually  subject to special passive activity loss rules.  If the MLP investment generates a loss to the investor, it  cannot be offset against any other income, even against another passive activity.  The loss is suspended  to  offset  future  MLP  income  and  then  only  offsets  other  income  upon  completely  exiting  the  MLP  investment     An investor’s basis in the MLP is the unit’s initial cost.  Cash distributions from the MLP lowers basis, the  allocated share of MLP income increases basis, and the allocated share of deductions like depreciation  lowers  basis.    If  basis  is  above  zero,  all  cash  distributions  are  100  percent  tax  deferred  until  a  sale.  If  basis is zero, cash distributions are a capital gain recognized in the year received     When the investor sells a stake in the MLP, total gain is calculated as the amount realized from the sale  minus the investor’s adjusted basis. The portion of the gain due to basis reductions from depreciation is  taxed as ordinary income according to section 1245 depreciation recapture rules. The portion of the gain  due  to  “hot  assets”  or  substantially  appreciated  inventory  and  unrealized  receivables  is  taxed  as  ordinary income according to section 751 rules.  The rest of the gain remaining is taxed as a capital gain 

Comparison of MLPs to C Corp. and S Corp. Structures 

ENTITY LEGAL STRUCTURE Entity Level Tax Unitholder/Shareholder Tax Unitholder/Shareholder Voting Rights Unitholder/Shareholder Limited Liability Publicly Traded Tax Deferred Distributions/Dividends Tax Reporting Forms # of Unitholders/Shareholders Limit

   

MLP No Yes No Yes Yes Yes K‐1 None

C Corp. Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes No DIV‐1099 None

S Corp. No Yes Yes Yes No Yes K‐1 100

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  4

The History of MLPs   

MLPs  were  initially  established  in  the  1980s,  with  the  first  IPO  occurring  in  1981,  Apache  Corp.  (NYSE:  APA).   There were more than 100 MLP IPOs between 1981 and 1987, primarily due to the lack of restrictions on the  type  of  businesses  that  MLPs  could  conduct  and  operate  which  resulted  in  entities  such  as  motel  owners,  amusement  park  companies,  casinos  and  professional  sports  teams  (Boston  Celtics  Limited  Partnership)  being  formed  as  MLPs  and  raising  capital  in  the  public  markets.    In  reaction  to  the  number  of  companies  that  were  taking advantage of the  tax benefits of MLPs, Congress closed this loophole  in 1987 by restricting the  type of  income  (primarily  from  energy‐related  activities)  that  was  deemed  to  be  qualifying  income  for  an  MLP.    Additionally,  many  of  the  original  energy‐related  MLPs  founded  in  the  1980s  could  not  maintain  their  distributions  unless  they  held  midstream  assets  with  limited  commodity  exposure  and  stable  cash  flows.   Upstream  and  downstream  MLPs  have  recently  returned  due  to  their  ability  to  minimize  their  commodity  exposure through hedging instruments or better inventory management.    Growth in MLPs as a Suitable Asset Class for Investors   

Over  the  last  few  years,  retail  and  institutional  investors  have  been  increasingly  attracted  to  MLPs’  relatively  high yields, better performance than other diversified and sector‐specific equity indices, low correlation to the  overall equity market, inflation‐adjusted returns, and notable tax advantages.    In the chart below, we have graphed the last 10 years of total returns generated from investing in one of the  most popular MLP Indexes, the Alerian MLP Index, a composite of the 50 most prominent energy MLPs, versus  the total returns from the S&P 500 during that same period.  Due to the significance of the distributions from  the MLP structure, a total return perspective should be used as this metric includes both a capital appreciation  component and a component that includes income received on the portfolio.  The Alerian MLP index is available  on a price return basis (NYSE: AMZ) and on a total return basis (NYSE: AMZX).  The SPDR S&P 500 ETF (NYSE:  SPY) was used as a proxy  for the S&P  500 and has  been  dividend‐adjusted to provide a total return measure.   Over this period, the Alerian MLP Index has nearly doubled the returns that an investor would have generated  from  investing  in  the  S&P  500  index.    An  investment  of  $1,000  in  January  2004  would  be  worth  $4,092  on  January 1, 2014 versus $2,032 for a $1,000 investment in the S&P 500 index. That means that the Alerian Index  has  outperformed  the  S&P  500  by  780  basis  points  on  average  over  the  last  10  years  on  a  compound  annual  growth rate basis. A basis point (BPS) is 1/100th of 1%, or stated as an interest rate equivalency, 100 BPS equal  1%.  Thus, this annual 780 basis point outperformance by the Alerian Index is equivalent to 7.8%.    MLP Index (AMZX) vs. S&P 500 (SPY) Total Returns 

$4,500  $4,092 

$4,000  $3,500 

Total Return

$3,000  $2,500  $2,032 

$2,000  $1,500  $1,000  $500  $‐ Jan‐04

Jan‐05

Jan‐06

Jan‐07

Recession

   

Jan‐08

Jan‐09

Jan‐10

Alerian (AMZX)

Jan‐11

Jan‐12

Jan‐13

S&P 500 (SPY)

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  5

    Historically,  approximately  50%  of  the  returns  from  MLPs  are  generated  through  distributions  to  unitholders  with the remaining 50% being generated from appreciation of the unit value.  The consistent outperformance of  the MLP asset class versus the historical performance of other indices is one of the driving factors behind the  increasing popularity of this asset class as an increasing allocation of investors’ investment portfolios.  The total  market  capitalization  of  energy  MLPs  has  increased  from  $220  billion  in  November  2010  to  more  than  $445  billion as of October 2013, which is partly due to the increase of the LP interests' values over the last three years  but also due to the fact that the number of publicly traded MLPs has increased from 72 to 107 over that same  time period1.    MLP’s Valuation Metrics    Due primarily to the MLP structure's competitive tax advantage  versus C Corporations and investors requiring  lower equity returns due to more consistent profitability of most MLP businesses, MLPs typically have a lower  cost of capital than C Corporations.  This lower cost of capital combined with investors seeking investments with  high  current  yields  have  resulted  in  MLP  units  being  valued  at  significantly  higher  valuation  multiples  (P/E,  Enterprise Value/EBITDA, etc.) than similar C Corporations.  For example, Susser Petroleum Partners, LP (NYSE:  SUSP),  the  real  estate  and  fuels  distribution  assets  that  Susser  Holdings  Corporation  (NYSE:  SUSS)  spun  off  in  2012,  currently  trades  at  a  trailing  twelve  months  Enterprise  Value/EBITDA  multiple  of  20.0x  while  Susser  Holdings  trades  at  10.6x  (adjusted  to  8.4x  when  factoring  in  its  General  Partnership  and  Limited  Partnership  ownership interest in Susser Petroleum).  Below is a table that compares the valuation metrics of the two fuels  distribution  and  convenience  store  real  estate  MLPs  (both  of  which  went  public  in  2012)  versus  six  pure‐play  publicly traded convenience store companies.      Publicly Traded Comparables ($ in millions, except per share data) Pure‐Play Convenience Retailers Company (Ticker) Alimentation Couche‐Tard Inc. (ATD.B) Casey's General Stores, Inc. (CASY) CST Brands, Inc. (CST) Murphy USA Inc. (MUSA) The Pantry, Inc. (PTRY) Susser Holdings Corporation (SUSS+)

Stock Price On  Market 2/13/14 Cap 78.37 66.56 30.16 39.62 13.71 59.65

14,815 2,561 2,280 1,852 322 888

Total Cash &  Debt Equiv 3,192 812 1,048 562 942 185

773 113 424 295 33 17

Enterprise EV/ Dividend Value Debt/ LTM LTM Yield (EV) EV EBITDA EBITDA (DY) 17,321 3,364 3,038 2,258 1,262 1,057

18.4% 24.1% 34.5% 24.9% 74.6% 17.5%

1,522 375 399 356 199 125

11.4x 9.0x 7.6x 6.3x 6.3x 8.4x+

0.49%  1.08%  0.83%  n.m.  n.m.  n.m. 

High Low Mean Median

11.4x 6.3x 8.2x 8.0x

1.08%  0.49%  0.80%  0.83% 

+ Susser Holdings Corporation (SUSS) has been adjusted for its holdings in Susser Petroleum Partners LP (SUSP) SUSS's unadjusted EV/ LTM EBITDA multiple based on the same period as presented above is 10.6x

Pure‐Play Wholesale MLPs

Company (Ticker) Lehigh Gas Partners LP (LGP) Susser Petroleum Partners LP (SUSP)

Stock Price On  Market 2/13/14 Cap 26.78 35.10

486 770

10‐yr Enterprise EV/ Dividend (2.73%) Total Cash &  Value Debt/ LTM LTM Yield Yield Debt Equiv (EV) EV EBITDA EBITDA (DY) Spread 311 185

0 18

797 940

39.0% 19.6%

54 47

High Low Mean / Median

   

14.8x 20.0x

7.51%  5.34% 

4.78%  2.61% 

20.0x 14.8x 17.4x

7.51%  5.34%  6.42% 

4.78%  2.61%  3.69% 

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  6

  It's these premium valuation multiples that allow MLPs to acquire companies or assets at higher prices than C  Corporations and still have them be accretive to their earnings.      As you can see from the table on the previous page, as of February 13, 2014, SUSP yields 5.34% and LGP yields  7.51%, which is 261 basis points and 478 basis points, respectively, greater than the current yield on the United  States 10 Year Treasury Note, which stands at 2.73% on that same date.  This spread is closely watched by MLP  investors,  potential  investors,  and  analysts,  as  it,  along  with  changes  in  distributions  to  unitholders,  are  the  primary drivers of unit values.  On the chart below, we compare the yield of the Alerian MLP Index historically  versus the U.S. 10 Year Treasury.  Over the 18 year period in the chart, the Alerian Index yield is on average 320  basis points higher than the 10 Year Treasury.      MLP Index (AMZ) Yield vs. 10 Year U.S. Treasury Yield 18.00%  16.00%  14.00%  12.00%  10.00%  8.00%  6.00% 

5.82% 

4.00%  3.04% 

2.00% 

  0.00%      Recession AMZ Yield 10 Yr. Yield     The  U.S.  economy  has  been  in  a  decreasing  interest  rate  environment  for  over  14  years,  but  the  analyst  consensus  is  that  rates  will  begin  to  increase  in  the  future,  although  few  agree  as  to  the  exact  timing  and  severity of the expected increase.  If rates do begin to increase, the only way for MLPs to continue to maintain  the existing spread between their yield and the 10 Year Treasury yield, while holding unit price constant, is to  increase distributions to unitholders. The table below displays the distribution increase that would be required  for LGP and SUSP to maintain a current yield spread of 4.78% and 2.61%, respectively, over the 10 Year Treasury  at several different interest rate scenarios.      MLPs' Sensitivity to Interest Rate Changes

   

Interest Rate Scenario

Yield Spread Over  Required Yield To  Required Distribution  Required Increase in  10 Year U.S.  10 Year U.S.  Maintain Current  Increase to Maintain  MLP's Distributions as a  Treasury Treasury Spread Current Spread % of Increase in 10 Year  Percent Yield Increase LGP SUSP LGP SUSP LGP SUSP LGP SUSP

Current 25 Basis Point Increase 50 Basis Point Increase 75 Basis Point Increase 100 Basis Point Increase

2.73% 2.98% 3.23% 3.48% 3.73%

n.a. 9.16% 18.32% 27.47% 36.63%

4.78% 4.78% 4.78% 4.78% 4.78%

2.61% 2.61% 2.61% 2.61% 2.61%

7.51% 7.76% 8.01% 8.26% 8.51%

5.34% 5.59% 5.84% 6.09% 6.34%

n.a. 3.33% 6.66% 9.99% 13.32%

n.a. 4.68% 9.36% 14.04% 18.72%

n.a. 36.37% 36.37% 36.37% 36.37%

n.a. 51.11% 51.11% 51.11% 51.11%

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  7

  To  maintain  the  current  yield  spread  in  an  increasing  interest  rate  environment,  MLPs  must  increase  per  unit  distributions; otherwise, the MLP units would need to decrease in value to maintain this differential.  However,  given that many prognosticators do not believe interest rates will increase quickly and the fact that many MLPs  have  managed  to  increase  their  distributions  significantly,  as  seen  in  the  table  below,  there  is  no  reason  to  believe that the outperformance of MLPs versus other asset classes will end soon.  The only conclusion that can  be reached is that it will likely take future distribution growth to drive unit prices higher going forward.      2012 2013 2013 2013     Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3   Quarterly Distribution   LGP $    0.2948 $    0.4525 $    0.4775 $    0.5025   SUSP $    0.4375 $    0.4375 $    0.4528 $    0.4687   Distribution Growth ‐ Quarter‐Over‐Quarter   LGP n.a. 53.5% 5.5% 5.2%   SUSP n.a. 0.0% 3.5% 3.5%   Distribution Growth ‐ Annualized   LGP n.a. 214.0% 22.1% 20.9%   SUSP n.a. 0.0% 14.0% 14.0%         MLP Unitholder Base    MLPs  impose  several  tax  restrictions  that  limit  the  tax  advantages  that  help  drive  MLP  yields  and  returns  for  owners.  Tax‐exempt entities such as non‐profits and endowments or accounts held by individuals such as IRAs,  401(k)s, and other retirement funds that hold MLPs generate unrelated business taxable income (UBTI). UBTI in  excess of $1,000 annually is taxable at the owner’s highest marginal rate, requires the fund’s custodian to file a  Form 990‐T, and requires payments on expected taxes of $500 or more.  For these reasons, investment in MLP  units  is  more  attractive  to  retail  investors  than  it  is  to  many  institutional  investors,  with  some  notable  exceptions. A Regulated Investment Company, such as a mutual fund, will lose its flow‐through status if it owns more than  10 percent of a single MLP or if more than 25 percent of the fund’s portfolio is invested in MLPs.  Additionally,  foreign  MLP  unitholders  are  also  generally  required  to  file  a  federal  income  tax  return.    Despite  these  limitations,  institutional  investors  have  been  consistently  increasing  their  share  of  MLP  ownership,  with  institutions owning 30% of MLPs in 2012 which is up from 23% in 20051.  However, the retail investor, especially  those that are seeking higher yielding investments, continues to be the largest owner of MLPs, resulting in retail  investors owning 65% of MLPs in 2012.  With more and more baby boomers reaching retirement age, there is a  continually  and  increasing  need  for  their  portfolios  to  generate  sufficient  yield  to  cover  their  living  expenses  without eating into their capital base.  This search for yield, particularly in a low interest rate environment, has  resulted in a higher proportion of their portfolio being invested in the MLP asset class.   

   

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  8

      Frequently Asked Questions    1.  How large does a company need to be to consider becoming an MLP?  While there is no exact answer to  this  question,  the  best  indication  of  required  value  is  to  look  at  the  unaudited  pro  forma  corporate  level  Adjusted EBITDAs for both Susser Petroleum Partners2 ($40.8 million) and Lehigh Gas Partners3 ($32.4 million)  for the trailing twelve months ending June 30, 2012 for each, a reporting period both companies used prior to  their IPO.  Susser Petroleum Partners went public on September 20, 2012, and Lehigh Gas Partners went public  on October 17, 2012.  It is unlikely that an offering would be well received at less than $25 million of Pro Forma  MLP qualifying Adjusted EBITDA.    2.  Is an MLP an exit strategy?  While all investors in MLPs eventually will want to exit, an MLP is really a  growth strategy.  An MLP allows a company wishing to grow to access the public equity markets and, potentially,  the  public  debt  markets  thereby  providing  greater  access  to  capital  than  a  privately  held  company  has.    A  substantial unitholder wishing to exit will always be constrained by the restricted period post going public and  the  average  daily  float  of  units  traded  and  the  perception  of  wide  selling  of  the  General  Partner’s  limited  partnership  units  would  likely  reduce  the  attractiveness  of  the  MLP  as  an  investment  for  other  unitholders,  putting downward pressure on the unit price.  The most likely exit for General Partners in small MLPs is to sell to  a larger MLP.                 

1

 

 MLP Primer Fifth Edition, October 2013. Published by Wells Fargo Securities LLC's Equity Research Department. 

2

 For Susser Petroleum Partners, Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA based on trailing twelve months ending June 30, 2012 as reported in its  SEC Filing Form S‐1 Amendment No. 3, dated September 10, 2012.     

3

 For Lehigh Gas Partners, Pro Forma Adjusted EBITDA based on trailing twelve months ending June 30, 2012 as reported in its SEC  Filing Form S‐1 Amendment No. 5, dated October 17, 2012. 

 

                               

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved. 

Volume 3  Issue 1

Capital Markets Perspective: Demystifying the Master Limited Partnership 

Page  9

Disclosures    1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

Nothing contained herein is an offer to sell or a solicitation to purchase any of the securities discussed herein.    The contents of this report are presented for informational purposes only. While Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc. and Matrix  Private Equities, Inc. (“Matrix”)  believe the information presented in this report is reasonable, this report is provided “AS IS”  and  without  warranty  of  any  kind,  either  expressed  or  implied,  including,  but  not  limited  to,  the  implied  warranty  of  merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, or non‐infringement. Matrix assumes no responsibility for errors or omissions  in this report or other documents which may be contained in, referenced, or linked to this report.  Any recipient of this report is  expressly responsible to seek out its own professional advice with respect to the information contained herein.    Matrix’s professionals, their spouses, family members, and other associated persons covered by applicable FINRA Regulations  are  not  currently  permitted  to  trade  in  any  of  the  securities  discussed  herein  with  the  exception  of  the  Alerian  MLP  Index  (AMZ).    Some assumptions on which this report is based inevitably will not materialize, and unanticipated events and circumstances will  occur. Moreover, as the report contains information pertaining to periods farther in the future, the assumptions become more  vulnerable to change, thereby making information contained therein for such periods more speculative. Therefore, the actual  events that may occur may vary from the projections contained in this report, and the variations may be material.  Matrix is not  obligated to notify you of any changes to the information contained herein.     The information contained in this report is based on estimates and assumptions about circumstances and events that have not  yet taken place, may not have an empirical basis, are subject to variation and are inherently unpredictable. Accordingly, there  can be no assurance that information relied upon in preparing this report will prove accurate or that any of the projections will  be realized. It is expected that there will be differences between actual and projected occurrences, and actual occurrences may  be materially greater or less than those contained in this report.  

 

This report reflects the consensus opinion of the investment bankers in our Energy & Multi‐Site Retail Group.     Matrix's Energy and Multi‐Site Retail Group is recognized as the national leader in providing transactional   advisory services to companies in the downstream energy and multi‐site retail sectors including convenience   store chains and petroleum marketers.

   

100 South Charles Street, Suite 1350 • Baltimore, MD 21201 • 410.752.3833 • www.matrixenergyandretail.com Two James Center, 1021 East Cary Street, Suite 1150 • Richmond, VA 23219 • 804.780.0060 | 200 South Wacker Drive, Suite 3112 • Chicago, IL 60606 • 312.674.4929 Copyright © 2014 Matrix Capital Markets Group, Inc.  All rights reserved.