Bodyweight Conditioning for fat loss

Bodyweight Conditioning for fat loss Bodyweight conditoning for fat loss Written by Lincoln Bryden Lincoln Bryden July 2008. All rights reserved. Wi...
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Bodyweight Conditioning for fat loss

Bodyweight conditoning for fat loss Written by Lincoln Bryden Lincoln Bryden July 2008. All rights reserved. Without limiting the rights under copyright reserved above, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored or introduced into a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means (electronic, photocopying, recording or otherwise), without the prior written permission of the copyright owner of this manual. ©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

IMPORTANT COPYRIGHT & LEGAL NOTICE: You Do NOT Have The Right To Reprint, Resell, Auction or Re-distribute Bodyweight Conditioning for Fat Loss E-book! You May NOT give away, sell, share, or circulate The Burn The Fat, Feed The Muscle E-Book or any of its content in any form! The copy of Bodyweight Conditioning for Fat Loss you have purchased is for your own personal use. The e-book is fully printable and one printed copy may be made for your own personal use. You are also welcome to copy the ebook to a CD-Rom, Zip disc or other storage media for backup for your own personal use. Electronic books, also known as e-books, are protected worldwide under international copyright and intellectual property law, the same as printed books, recorded material and other literary works. Under Copyright law, "Literary Work" includes "computer", "computer program", "software", and all related materials sold online, including electronic books (e-books), and adobe acrobat PDF files. Copyright infringement, trademark infringement and theft of intellectual property are serious crimes.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER This program is for educational and informative purposes only and is not intended as medical or professional advice. Always consult your doctor before making any changes to your fitness regime. The purpose of this program is to help healthy people reach their cosmetic fitness goals by educating them in proper exercise guidelines. No health claims are made for this program. This exercise program will not help cure, heal, or correct any illness, metabolic disorder, or medical condition. The author is not a medical doctor, registered dietician, or clinical nutritionist; the author is a fitness consultant. If you have been sedentary and are unaccustomed to vigorous exercise, you should obtain your physician’s clearance before beginning an exercise program. The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) recommends that apparently healthy individual who are male and over 40 or female and over 50 to have both a physical exam and a diagnostic exercise test prior to starting a vigorous exercise program. A diagnostic exercise test and physical examination is also recommended in individuals of any age who exhibit two or more of the major coronary risk factors (smoking, family history of heart disease, elevated blood cholesterol, elevated blood pressure, and diabetes). Any individual with a known history of heart disease or other heart problems should be required to have a medical evaluation including a graded exercise test before engaging in strenuous physical activity. The author and publisher shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any Person or entity with respect to any of the information contained in this manual. The user assumes all risk for any injury, loss or damage caused or alleged to be caused, directly or indirectly by using any information described in this course.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bodyweight Conditioning for Fat Loss – A New Direction in Group Fitness Classes I have been fortunate to be involved in group fitness for nearly 20 years and have seen many trends. Some have fallen by the wayside, but many have stayed. In this world of competition I feel that clients are coming to our classes with more expectations and more desires. I feel that if we did a straw poll as the main reason that people come to classes, I am sure that we would find that to “lose weight”, or “get ready for my holiday/wedding/reunion” would be up there in the top three. Again if you were to do another straw poll of the most popular class in health clubs and sports centres around the world, I am sure that the good old fashioned “LBT” (legs bums and tums) class would be up there as well. Bearing this in mind, I have been somewhat troubled with the fact that many people had been coming to aerobic and conditioning classes and conventions for many years and have not significantly changed their body shape, or if they did they were smaller versions of their larger self. This meant that if they felt that they had big hips in relation to the rest of their body, then they would become a smaller version of this. So I began experimenting with a group class format which took many principles from personal training, backed up with some research and then adapted to a class setting. I am pleased to say that those people that were the true “aerobic junkies” are now achieving desired results of fat loss plus body shape change. I am confident to say that this course will help you create change in your clients, and, if you do the class yourself, you will definitely see changes in your posture, bodyshape and fat loss. Trust Me! You will see that the class consists of a segment of cardio training which is different from the traditional view of aerobics, as well as some conditioning exercises which may be new to some people, but which definitely reach the parts other exercises don’t reach. Those that know me know that there always needs to be a reason why before I actually do anything, and so I feel that rather than say “thou must do conditioning classes like this forevermore” I will briefly explain the reasons behind bodyweight conditioning for fat loss.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Cardio Training Yes this program does include cardio training, but it is not in the traditional “aerobic training” form that is seen in most group exercise classes. Cardio training refers to any exercise in which the heart and lungs are involved. This could be jogging, running, sprinting, swimming, circuit training, etc. Quite simply, if you are elevating your heart rate and respiration rate, you are doing some form of cardiovascular work. Traditional aerobic theory has been based on the notion that there is a fat burning zone and that to burn the most calories from body fat stores we need to work in this “zone” as much as possible. This zone has been characterised by low intensity aerobic work. Although it is true that the body does burn a greater amount of fat working at lower intensities, at higher intensities you will burn a higher total amount of calories, and therefore more fat in total. Aerobic training makes the body more efficient at burning fat. Whilst this may sound great, if you train in this way, you are conditioning you body to so efficient so that it burns less fat for the same amount of aerobic work. Therefore to increase the intensity of the work you would either have to train for longer, which for most of us is not a desirable option, or increase the intensity of the work. However if you take this to its logical conclusion you would raise the intensity to such a degree that you would actually enter the anaerobic energy system. Whilst this may sound disastrous, there have been many studies that are showing that anaerobic interval training actually aids the increase of our body’s metabolism. This is defined as the mechanism that dictates how many calories we burn every day. Muscle is more metabolically active than fat, so it is in our interest to increase the amount of muscle mass that we have so as to keep our metabolism elevated If our aims during our group exercise class is to achieve this for a long period of time that the answer is not aerobic training, because this will only burn calories while we are doing it. The real key is anaerobic training, which burns calories while you are doing it AND increases the calories burned for hours afterwards. The key with anaerobic training is what is known as EPOC (excess postexercise oxygen consumption). Anaerobic exercise burns calories while you are performing it. However, the metabolism also remains elevated following this type exercise, which is our overall aim and is the reason why we include bodyweight circuits at the end of the class to further push that EPOC figure up.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bodyweight Circuit Training Strength training is the single best activity people can add to their fat loss routine. Why? Well if we can increase the amount of lean muscle tissue on the body, you will burn fat at an accelerated rate. Five pounds of muscle takes up about a third of the space of five pounds of fat. So using this example it would be possible to undergo a well structured conditioning fat loss class and over a period of time weight the same weight but still be able to drop inches around those all important parts of your body. In this class, we use multi-joint exercises that hit a large amount of muscle at the same time (burns more calories). We also use explosive movements to target the higher threshold motor units (burns more calories), and we use multiple planes of movement – three dimensional training which, you guessed it – burns more calories. The way that this is done is by using a version of circuit training. Traditional circuit training would have the participant perform a list of 10 different exercises one after the after. To increase the intensity this workout would consist of 3-4 mini circuits of non competing multi joint exercises. The way that it is structured allows the participant the rest one area of the body, while another area is being worked, therefore increasing the total workload. Have a look at the sample class to see how everything is put together. In fact before you proceed, I would suggest that you go though the workout yourself to feel its effectiveness. Go on……I dare you!

Why we use bodyweight exercises. Muscle tension comes when you place resistance on the muscles. And it doesn’t matter what form that resistance takes. As far as the muscles are concerned, resistance is resistance is resistance. The muscles have no idea what form the resistance takes, whether it is a dumbbell, a resistance band, a barbell or your bodyweight. True, free weights are superior to machines when it comes to building strength, but it’s because free weights require you to stabilize the load in three planes, not because the weight on the muscles is any different. Logic would suggest, the only reason to ever use external load (i.e. weights) is because your bodyweight is not enough resistance. Yet we often see people in the gym and studio making exercises harder by adding external load, when they aren’t capable of handling their bodyweight in the same exercise. The key to effective bodyweight exercises are the same as with any exercise – time and tension. We need to select exercises that load the muscles effectively through the entire range of motion, and select a speed of movement that eliminates all momentum. ©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Time Under Tension (TUT) Time under tension is the amount of time that your muscle is being stressed while performing a particular exercise. So for example if you were doing squats, a TUT could be 4-2-2. What this means is that you would take 4 seconds on the lowering phase of the movement, hold for 2 seconds at the bottom, and then take 2 seconds to come back to standing. Therefore 1 rep would take 8 seconds. So if you completed 10 reps of those squats the Time under tension would be 80 seconds. In a gym format the amount of time your muscles should spend under tension is determined by your goals. You can workout to increase 3 things; a) Strength and Power b) Your muscle mass (hypertrophy) c) Your endurance The length of time your muscle is under tension changes with each goal. Have a look at the following chart

Workout Variables

Sets (min – max) Reps (min – max) Time Under Tension

Strength/Power Hypertrophy Endurance 1–4

2–5

1–3

1–8

8–14

15–25

4–30sec

30–60sec

60–100sec

TUT ranges allow you to be more precise about the amount of work you place on a muscle. Using the barbell curl example, if you did 10 reps at four seconds per rep, you worked the muscle for 40 seconds, which coincidentally is the optimal TUT to stress a muscle for gains in mass. But if it took you only three seconds to complete each rep (a TUT equal to 30 seconds), you weren’t training the muscle optimally for growth, even though the reps are in the proper range. Regardless of your training goals, it’s important to vary your reps and TUT times within the range of your goal so you don’t get stuck in a rut. So what does this mean for group exercise instructors? Well we have the benefit of exercising to music. Therefore we can use the music tempo to work out how many repetitions we need to do for a given rep speed.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Individual task – choose 2 pieces of music; one at 95 bpm (a streetdance cd), and one at around 130 bpm (a step cd). Listen to them both. Now count out the following rhythm tempos, and write down how many times you would need to perform those tempos in order to keep a muscle under tension for 70seconds. Use the chart below to help you. Desired tempos 1) 2) 3) 4) 5)

Up for 2, down for 2 Up for 3, down for 1 Up for 4, down for 4 Up for 4, hold for 2, down for 2 Up for 8, hold for 4, down for 4

Music Speed 96bpm Tempo 1 2 3 4 5

TUT 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds

Number of reps

Music Speed 130 bpm Tempo 1 2 3 4 5

TUT 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds 40 – 60 seconds

Number of reps

So now, already before we begin, you have 5 different repetition tempos, and a guideline of the number of repetitions to do, to achieve our conditioning aims

Conclusion Interval training and circuit strength training are both key components of Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss. The following pages will break down how the program is put together, as well as give you a directory of exercises that you can use to devise your own classes and give you ideas for months to come

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bodyweight conditioning masterclass Body weight warm up. – Repeat for 3 circuits. Perform each exercise for 16 reps

T squat

close grip push up

split squats

spiderman climbs

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Main Workout Mini Circuit A

Single legged deadlift

Push Ups Mini Circuit B

reaching lunge

Rotating Plank

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Mini Circuit C

Prisoner SIFF Squat

Lying single leg hip extension Mini Circuit D – core conditioning

Side run

bike crunch

superman

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bodyweight Interval Workout Repeat Circuit 3 – 5 times with 30 seconds rest in between sets. Each exercise is to be performed for 30 seconds each

y squat

jumping jacks

offset push up

Squat Runs

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Lower Body Workshop Most leg exercises fall under the quad dominant category. Squats, deadlifts, leg presses and the like are all quad dominant exercises. While the hip extensor muscle groups (hamstrings and glutes) are activated during these movements, the quads take most of the training stress, and therefore receive the largest training response. Hip Dominant exercises are ones in which hamstrings and glutes predominate. In this area we can use a mixture of single leg exercises and exercises in which both feet are on the gorund. A lot of training research is suggesting that single leg exercises should be used in all training programs. The reason for this is that most of our everyday life is spent doing single leg activity (think about walking, running, etc) When looking at single leg exercises it initially becomes apparent that single leg exercises can be broken down into knee dominant exercises, or those that appear to be variations of a squatting movement and, hip dominant exercises, or, hip dominant, those that appear to prioritize the glutes and hamstrings and generally appear to be variations of straight leg deadlifts or bridging exercises. The following area is a list of hip dominant and quad dominant exercises that can be used as part of your bodyweight class.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Hip Dominant/ Exercises

Traditional exercises for the glutes involve the leg in what is called an "open chain" position with the foot - the final link in the chain - off the ground or free. Yet in the real world this muscle is highly active during "closed-chain" activities where the foot is on the ground. Examples of glute function include climbing stairs, rising from a chair, or going up hills. The buttock muscles are also hard at work when bending forward, squatting, stooping, and lunging. Many popular exercises such as leg raises will tone the buttock region, but such non-functional movements aren't sufficient to retrain the glutes so as to enhance performance. If an exercise works the glutes in a non functional way - such as without the foot on the ground - then only a cosmetic goal can be achieved. However, there are numerous exercises that if performed with proper form can achieve both cosmetic and performance enhancement goals. Furthermore, studies have shown that training the glutes is important for helping to stabilize the low back in those with low back pain

If we understand the integrated function of the hip complex then we can see that there is a much wider range of functional exercises that we can do.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Adductors Isolated function - Concentrically accelerates hip adduction, flexion and internal rotation. Integrated function - Eccentrically decelerates hip abduction, extension, an external rotation - Dynamically stabilises the lumbo pelvic hip complex

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Gluteus Medius Isolated Function - Concentrically accelerates hip abduction and external rotation Integrated function Eccentrically decelerates hip adduction and internal rotation Isometrically stabilises the lumbo pelvic hip complex

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Tensor Fascia Latae (TFL) Isolated function – Concentrically accelerates hip flexion, abduction and internal rotation Integrated function - Eccentrically decelerates hip adduction and internal rotation - Isometrically stabilises the lumbo pelvic hip complex

Gluteus Maximus Isolated Function Concentrically accelerates hip extension and external rotation Integrated function Eccentrically decelerates hip flexion and internal rotation Decelerates tibial internal rotation via the IT band Isometrically stabilises the lumbo pelvic hip complex So we can see that there is far more to the good old glutes than hip extension. A further illustration will show how important the glutes are to every day movement. During walking the femur undergoes strong internal rotation as the foot strikes the ground. This movement needs to be decelerated eccentrically by the glutes. Also the hip is undergoing adduction and flexion, both being decelerated by the glutes. Therefore at this point the glutes have been stretched and loaded in all 3 planes of movement. By understanding this we can see that we can accentuate these actions to increase the natural loading further. We can do this by using other parts of our body to further drives us into these positions, accentuating the load and forcing the “proprioceptors to turn the muscle on”.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Let’s use the lunge as an example Traditionally the exercise is done with the torso in an upright position. This is great if we want to work the illiopsoas and quads, but not good if we want to target the glutes

Our goals for effective recruitment of the glutes are simple; -

Increase internal rotation of the hip Increase flexion of the hip Increase lateral flexion of the pelvis

So by using a few changes we can further challenge the gluteal muscles Uni or bilateral reach By using a uni or bilateral reach with the hands towards the ground, we can achieve all of the above. The reach increases increases hip flexion, and also increases the stretch of the glutes which forces them to eccentrically decelerate the movement. This results in a more forceful explosion out of the lunge with reach position.

Touch down

A great hip extension exercise. From a standing position, flex from the knee and the hip to touch the floor. Hold this position for a couple of seconds then repeat for the desired number of repetitions

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Single Leg deadlift

Another great hip extension exercise. From a standing position, flex from the knee and the hip to touch the floor. Hold this position for a couple of seconds then squeeze the glutes to extend up to a standing position

Single leg Romanian deadlift Similar to the single leg deadlift, but this time the knee remains fixed and the flexion comes just from the hip. This exercise can be done with or without weights

Single leg Hip Extension

Lunge and touch

Lying in a prone position, push the hips off the floor so that the hips, shoulder and knee are in line. Bring the opposite leg into the body. Lower the bottom to the floor and use your glutes to extend up to the start position From a standing position lunge either forwards, to the side or backwards, aiming to touch the floor. Make sure the back is straight and knees flex to protect the lower back

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Reverse Lunge From a standing position lunge lunge backwards, then using the glutes extend up to the starting position.

Inline skaters lunge From a standing position bend both legs. Take the right leg out to the side, and then bring it back into the centre. Repeat this 3 times on the same leg and then extend the left leg up to standing, and then back down again.

Practice the above exercises, writing down any relevant teaching points next to the relevant diagram.

Quad dominant exercises Jump lunges From a static lunge position, jump up in the air, and change the position of the feet. Repeat for the desired number of reps

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Power squats From a squat position, jump and land back into the original position. Make sure that you cushion the landing.

SIFF Squat Perform a normal squat but keep the heels off the floor at all times to place a greater emphasis on the quads

SIFF Lunges Perform a normal lunge but again keep the heel of the front leg off the floor at all times to increase the load on the quads.

T squat Perform a normal squat but with the hands out to the side, squeezing the shoulder blades together.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Single leg squats Perform a normal squat but with the emphasis on the supporting leg

Practice the above exercises, writing down any relevant teaching points next to the relevant diagram. If you have time think of different teaching tempos that could work the quads for between 40 – 70 seconds.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Upper Body workshop By using purely bodyweight exercises, without equipment we are somewhat limited in terms of the exercises that we can include. However if we remember that our overall aim is to create a metabolic disturbance and cause the blood to flow alternatively from upper to lower body, then we do have a few options. Plyometric push ups Perform a normal push up but fully extend at the end of the repetition so that you leave the floor.

Staggered/offset push ups Perform a normal push up but have one hand slightly in front of the shoulder and the other one slightly behind. This places a slight rotational force on the core muscles which then requires them to work harder.

Push Up into a row In between each push up row the hands into the body. This is a brilliant upper body exercise for the core and is not as easy as it looks!

T Push UP

In between each push up, rotate the body so that you form a T shape. Again this is a great exercise for the core as well as developing shoulder stability and upper body strength

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Core Conditioning There has been a lot of debate about whether to include crunches/sit ups as part of a core conditioning routine. There are many reasons for this but the diagram below illustrates the point really well. The line shows that excessive use of crunches can reinforce bad posture

Take into account all the hunched over positions we are in from sitting, commuting, texting on the Blackberry and working on the computer. Then we go to the gym to do sit ups and work too much on chest and bicep muscles and not enough upper back; more reinforcement of poor posture. Although research has shown that some spinal flexion work is good for the spine, the following exercises can be used for your bodyweight conditioning class Basic Plank The main teaching points here is that the shoulders and hips should be in line and the shoulder blades should be squeezed together.

Single arm plank A more advanced option is to perform the basic plank on one arm, to provide a greater challenge to the core.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

HERE ARE SOME MORE VARIATIONS FOR YOU! Plank with arm extension

Plank Walkup

The Core Row: This is a great variation to the plank, definitely a little more advanced.

Side Plank with leg Abduction

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Spiderman Climbs

Rotating side plank

Side run In a side plank position, flex the top leg so that the knee is in front of the body, take it back to the original position, and then extend the hip backwards, keeping the spine aligned. Dead ant Lying on your back, keep the lower back in the floor while you extend one arm and one leg out in front and behind you.

Lower Ab Hold Keeping the lower back on the floor, begin with the legs at right angles to the body, then extend the leg away from you until you feel the lower back coming off the floor. Push the lower back into the floor and hold for 60 seconds.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bird Dog On your hands and knees, try to keep your spine in its neutral position while you extend one leg and one arm out in front of you.

Lower With the legs at 90° to the body rotate them to each side under control, making sure you keep the shoulders on the floor.

Upper Body Russian Twist

As above but this time it is the upper body that rotates and the lower body is fixed

Reverse Crunch

Practice all of the core exercises listed above to check your technique. Add teaching points next to the diagrams if you wish. Choose 3 exercises which you could use as a core circuit. ©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Class construction Now that you have seen a variety of hip dominant, quad dominant, upper body and lower body exercises, now you are free to create your mini circuits or supersets. Using the table below alternate devise your choice of supersets balancing between lower body and upper body/core.

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core –

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core –

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core –

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core –

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core

Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bodyweight interval training. A lot of recent research is showing that anaerobic interval training can, when used in conjunction with conditioning exercises help boost metabolism, create EPOC and ultimately help burn body fat. Within our class we can incorporate a bodyweight circuit using some good old fashioned exercises (done safely of course!) Example Bodyweight Interval Workout Repeat Circuit 3 – 5 times with 30 seconds rest in between sets. Each exercise is to be performed for 30 seconds each

y squat

jumping jacks

offset push up

Squat Runs

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Other exercises that you could use include; Burpees

Squat runs

Tuck Jumps

Leg Matrix

OR ANY AEROBIC MOVEMENT! You can be as creative as you want here, a good rule of thumb is to choose 4 exercises to perform them for 30 seconds, then repeat the whole circuit. Small group task – choose 4 exercises that could comprise an anaerobic circuit. Put them together and practice going through the circuit twice, to see whether it is effective! ©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Conclusion – Putting it all together So now you have all the pieces of your class we just now need to put it together. Use the table below to put together your bodyweight conditioning class. Warm Up Exercise 1. 2. 3. 4. Main Workout Mini Circuit A Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core – Mini Circuit B Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core – Mini Circuit C Lower Body exercise – Upper Body/core – Core Circuit Core Exercise 1 Core Exercise 2 Core Exercise 3

Body weight Interval Exercise 1. 2. 3. 4. .

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

Bonus workout for you. Warm Up Y squat Press Ups Side lunge Core Row Circuit 1 Windmill lunge and touch Rotating Side Plank Circuit 2 Single legged romanian deadlift Offset Press Up Circuit 3 Siff Lunge T Push Up Core Circuit Back Raise Reverse Crunch Dead ant Bodyweight Circuit Leg Matrix Squat runs Press Ups

Good Luck!!

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]

About the Author

Lincoln has his own business, Total Fitness, and has a BSc degree in Recreation Management and Sports Science. He has been involved in the fitness industry for 19 years and has presented sessions all over the world, including Italy, Spain, Holland, Germany France, Hong Kong, and Mexico. Linx has toured the UK presenting his unique stylised sessions, and is the creator of 20 fitness videos. In between organising his own fitness and dance days, he had his own TV Slot on the popular Big Breakfast TV Show, teaching streetdance fitness. He currently works as a lecturer at London Leisure College, and was the first instructor to gain the CYQ Level 3 Advanced Studio instructor award.

©Lincoln Bryden, Bodyweight conditioning for fat loss manual, July 2008 [email protected]