Aviation Department City of Kansas City, Missouri

CITY OF FOUNTAINS HEART OF THE NATION K A N S AS C I T Y M I S S O U R I Aviation Department City of Kansas City, Missouri Agency Coordination a...
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CITY OF FOUNTAINS HEART OF THE NATION

K A N S AS

C I T Y

M I S S O U R I

Aviation Department City of Kansas City, Missouri

Agency Coordination and Public Involvement The Part 150 Study was conducted concurrently with the preparation of an Airport Master Plan and an Area Plan for the airport environs. A key element of each study, and in particular of the Part 150 Study Update is coordination of the evaluations and results with public agencies and the airport's neighbors. In order to inform and gather input from the public regarding the findings of the Part 150 Study Update, a Planning Advisory Committee (PAC) and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) were formed. Additionally, visioning sessions were held early during the planning process, a series of Public Information Workshops were conducted at critical milestones during the process, and a formal Public Hearing was conducted at the end of the process. Each was conducted to receive public thoughts and comments about the conditions of aircraft noise in the airport environs, as well as to vet solutions for abatement and mitigation actions through a community screening of concepts. The following committee representatives were instrumental in the development of the Kansas City International Airport 14 CFR Part 150 Noise Compatibility Study Update.

Planning Advisory Committee (PAC)

Technical Advisory Committee (TAC)

Federal and Regional Agencies

Federal Agencies

FAA Central Region Kansas City International Airport Tower Mid-America Regional Council Kansas City Area Transportation Authority

FAA Central Region FAA Kansas City International Airport Tower

Elected Officials Chair, Platte County Board of Commissioners Mayor, City of Platte City Mayor, City of Parkville

Local Agencies and School Districts Park Hill School District Platte County School District R-3 Kansas City, MO Parks and Recreation Commission Kansas City, Missouri Plan Commission Kansas City Missouri, Public Improvement Advisory Committee (PIAC) Kansas City, Missouri City Planning and Development Kansas City, Missouri Aviation Department

City and County Agencies Platte County Planning and Zoning Platte City Administrator Kansas City, Missouri Planning and Development Kansas City, Missouri Aviation Department

Airport Tenants National Business Aviation Association KCI Regional Air Cargo Association Air Line Pilots Association Southwest Airlines, KCI Council Air Line Pilots Association United Parcel Service as representative of local air cargo American Airlines Maintenance Base

Airport Tenants BAX Global National Business Aviation Association KCI Regional Air Cargo Association Air Line Pilots Association Southwest Airlines, KCI Council Air Line Pilots Association

Citizen Representatives

Prepared By: Landrum & Brown

Aviation Planning at the Leading Edge

In association with:

Patti Banks Associates The Jones Payne Group Barry Technologies Phillips West

January 2009

KCI Neighborhoods Association Northland Neighborhoods, Inc.

Local Business Community Platte County Economic Development Corporation Economic Development Corporation of Kansas City Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce Kansas City Area Development Council Leavenworth County Development Corporation Northland Regional Chamber of Commerce

The City of Kansas City, Missouri Aviation Department would like to thank all of the individuals and organizations who participated in the development of the Kansas City International Airport 14 CFR Part 150 Noise Compatibility Study. Without the assistance of these individuals and the many members of the public who attended one or more of the public meetings held through the course of the planning process, the results would not have been successful.

responsibility $429,000

of

the

Airport,

and

would

be

a

to

Recreation Department.

cost

approximately

the

Parks

and

Consequently, the cost to

local governmental bodies would be approximately $1,129,000 in one-time expenditures over the next five years, and $510,000 in continuing expenditures for staff and management support of a designated staff liaison for noise and community planning needs.

8

Cost and Funding of Noise Compatibility Program Measures

Purpose of the Study

What is a 14 CFR Part 150?

The Kansas City Aviation Department determined to update its 1994 Part 150 Study to assure that the programs that had been implemented at that time were still appropriate to conditions in 2007. Areas around the airport have been rapidly developing in residential uses that are not generally considered to be compatible with aircraft operations. Further, a number of the key land use management recommendations of the earlier plan were not fully implemented. The airport is a significant public investment and valuable economic resource to the metropolitan region that should be protected from uses that may encroach upon its ability to respond to the regional needs. The purpose of conducting a Part 150 Study update at an airport is to develop a balanced, costeffective plan to reduce current aircraft noise impacts over noise-sensitive land uses and, where practical, to limit the potential for future noise impacts. By following the Part 150 regulations, the airport sponsor is assured of FAA cooperation through the involvement of air traffic control professionals and FAA review of the recommended NCP. An airport with an FAA-approved NCP also becomes eligible to make application for funding assistance to implement the NCP measures. Among the general goals and objectives to be addressed in a Part 150 Study are the following:  To reduce, where feasible, existing and forecasted noise levels over existing noisesensitive land uses;  To reduce the introduction of new noise-sensitive land uses near the airport;  To mitigate, where feasible, adverse impacts in accordance with Federal guidelines;  To provide mitigation measures that are sensitive to the needs of the community and its stability;  To minimize the impact of mitigation measures on local tax bases; and  To be consistent, where feasible, with local land use planning and development policies.

Part 150 is a section of the Federal Code of Regulations for Aviation that sets forth the requirements and guidelines for airports desiring to undertake airport noise compatibility planning or mitigation with Federal funding assistance. Part 150 outlines a planning process and requires the development of two products: Noise Exposure Maps and a Noise Compatibility Program. Noise Exposure Maps are prepared to illustrate airport noise exposure patterns for the existing condition and a forecast condition five years after the date of submission of the maps for FAAreview. Maps were prepared for the baseline year 2007 and forecast for 2013. A Noise Compatibility Program includes provisions for the abatement of aircraft noise through aircraft operating actions or land use management controls. These actions are intended to mitigate the impact of aircraft noise on existing incompatible land uses and manage the development of vacant lands to assure that incompatible uses do not develop in the future. The program also must contain provisions for updating and periodic revision. Airport Environs

1

Noise Compatibility Program The KCI Noise Compatibility Program includes three distinct sections: a noise abatement element that carries forward previously approved aircraft operating procedures; a land use element that provides for land use management actions; and a program management element that sets forth efforts to administer, monitor and update the program.

Existing Noise Exposure Compared to 1998 Noise Exposure

!

Informal preferential runway use program to

. This program favors takeoffs to the north and landings from the south. Currently, the airport operates approximately 60% of the time in north flow and results in the louder departures taking off over largely vacant land to the north of the airport more than half of the time, and placing arrivals from the south along predictable straight-in approach corridors that avoided by incompatible residential development. favor north traffic flow

!

Informal nighttime runway use program with landings on Runways 1L and 19L and takeoffs

. This program favors nighttime (10 p.m. until 6 a.m.) activity to use the on Runways 1R and 19R

2

The implementation of the three Airport acquisitions will remove the potential for the development of noisesensitive incompatible uses within the areas exposed

!

to significant aircraft noise exposure (within the 65 DNL contour) through the projected activity levels for the year 2013. These actions will place the airport in the enviable position of owning its area of significant

!

impact as defined by federal regulation few large airports achieve that goal.

Noise Abatement Element

Initial evaluations of the noise exposure pattern present at the airport in 2007 indicate that significant noise, as defined by Federal regulation, is restricted to the airport, or to an area immediately north of the western of the two parallel north-south runways, and north of Interstate Highway 29. This pattern constitutes a substantial reduction in the size of the significantly exposed offairport lands projected by the first Part 150 Study for 1998. The reduction in contour size is a direct result of the mandated elimination of older, louder aircraft from the operating fleets of air carriers at the end of 1999 and their replacement by aircraft that operate under the quietest noise level guidance. Afurther influence on the reduction of the areas exposed to aircraft noise has been a considerable reduction in the use of the eastwest runway since the construction of the eastern parallel runway in the mid-1990s. Because modifications of aircraft activity must have a benefit within the area exposed to significant noise levels (65 decibels for the average day, or 65 DNL), and because the off-airport areas exposed to this level is so close to the runway end, little could be done to modify the activity patterns to reduce exposure in that area. Two measures that had been implemented after the 1993 Part 150 Study were recommended for continuation. They are:

!

Effects of Land Use Management Actions

These

jointly

Compatibility Overlay District.

Platte County, and by Platte City will place these three

establish

a

It assigns staff

responsibilities and relies on those staff to set a

jurisdictions squarely on the side of protecting their

schedule and process for efficient review of

substantial investment and labor center at the Airport

requests made to any of the three jurisdictions.

by discouraging the development of uses that will

Lmax to seek minimization of these potential conflicts.

Initiate an update of the Noise Exposure Maps everyfiveyearsor whenequivalent(daytime+ ten times nighttime) operations grow more than17percentabove2006levels),and Initiate an update of the Noise Compatibility Program every ten years or when/if equivalent (daytime + ten times nighttime) operations in any single year exceed that year's forecasts by more than 40 percent.

The acquisition of the property along Highway 152 for

planning

conflict with the Airport's ability to freely operate within the area airspace.

The introduction of residential or

!

other noise-sensitive facilities into the immediate environs of the Airport will often lead to elevated levels of public complaint about aircraft noise, even if the locations of those making complaints are well beyond the areas of significant noise exposure.

!

Hence, the

District regulations address development guidance on areas out to 60 DNL and outward to 80 decibels of

These two measures

assure that the efforts undertaken in the Part 150

park purposes will remove this acreage lying between

result

altitude from potential development in incompatible

flexible

enough

to

of

new

or

expanded

service,

route

substantial noise around the airport.

!

Program Management Element successful

Compatibility

implementation

Program

is

of

dependent

any

upon

airport to rapidly communicate to the public

the

expected changes or abnormalities at the airport, as well as general information about noise and

through on the recommended actions, as well to

other environmental issues that require public

recognize unanticipated conditions that may warrant

review and input.

reassessment of the program. Seven measures have been incorporated into the NCP Update

Establish environmental information the airport web site.

This service will allow the

Noise

commitment to a continuing effort to assure follow

!

remain

modification, or new development in areas of

uses.

The

process

address changing conditions that may arise as a

the approaches by aircraft at approximately 700 feet

The preceding map comparing 1998 and 2008 noise exposure patterns illustrates the reduction in the size of the noise pattern for 60, 65, 70 and 75 decibel levelsand south of the airport. The maps below compare the 2007 noise contour of 65 DNL with the

measures

may be proposed anywhere within the Airport

District regulations by the City of Kansas City, by

Effect of Noise Abatement Actions

three

formalized review of development actions that

The adoption of the Airport Compatibility Overlay

runways more remote from developed residential areas. The measure remains a voluntary part of the operating scheme at the airport and is continued as part of the Noise Compatibility Program. However, the preference of the cargo operators who are all located adjacent to the west parallel runway and frequently fly at night, to use the west parallel runway for all activity negates a substantial portion of the noise pattern shift that might have been attributable to this measure. Nevertheless, the contours of significant exposure levels do not extend far enough beyond the airport boundaries for this to have resulted in substantial land use/aircraft noise conflicts.

Designate airport staff position as liaison contact for noise and land use coordination withplanningagencies,and Designate planning staff position as liaison contact for noise and land use coordination withAirport,and Implement review process for development proposals within the land use compatibility zones approved within any jurisdiction.

Maintain system for receiving and responding to noise complaints.

Cost and Funding

The success of the Noise

The cost of implementing the Noise Compatibility

Compatibility Program requires a continuing effort

Program is estimated to be $3,529,000 (2008 dollars)

to

in

monitor

compliance

and

identify

new

or

one-time

expenditures

and

approximately

The airport has a well

$102,000 annually, excluding administrative costs for

organized system of recording and responding to

collaborative planning by the planning jurisdictions to

noise complaints.

It is important for the airport

evaluate land use proposals. Of the one-time costs,

management to acknowledge and respond to

approximately $2,320,000 would be eligible for grant

complaints, even if it is not possible to take

reimbursement

remedial action.

Administration,

unanticipated conditions.

from while

the

Federal

$700,000

would

Av i a t i o n be

the

7

,

Zone 1: Property falling within the area

Should that happen, when the west parallel

exposed to Maximum Noise Levels of 80 decibels or more as projected for a Boeing 737700 aircraft (the most frequently forecast aircraft in the future fleet at the Airport), but not within the bounds of any other zone. Limit

runway is extended during Phase 2 of the Airport's Facility Development Program, the area would be subject to high environmental risk. Therefore, it is advisable that the land be acquired and banked for future Airport need as the airfield develops in future years.

development of residential uses to not more than three to five units per acre.

!

Encourage Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department to acquire approximately 143 acres north of Missouri Highway 152, as shown for acquisition by the Tiffany Springs Park Master Plan .

This property lies under or

between the approach paths from the south.

Its

adjacency to the Park argues for its inclusion in that community asset. Should it not be acquired, it should be considered for acquisition by the Airport to protect the proposed south entrance to the airfield. The proposed areas of acquisition are indicated on the exhibit below.

levels for the annual average condition (DNL). Noteworthy is the elimination of noise in excess of 65 DNL east of I-29 and the substantial reduction of contour sizes north and south of the airport. The maps below compare the 2007 noise contour of 65 DNLwith the pattern projected for the years 2013 and for the ultimate construction of facilities addressed by the concurrent Master Plan. Notably, there is little difference between the contours of 65 DNL over off-airport areas, but the contour of 60 DNL (moderate noise exposure) is widened by the addition of a third parallel runway west of the present facilities. The substantial reduction in the number of persons exposed to various ranges of aircraft noise reflects the changes in the way the airport has been used since the first Part 150 study, as well as the quieting of the air carrier fleet. By 2007, only one home remains within the 65 DNL contour, and with the

implementation of the recommendations of the Noise Compatibility Program discussed in the next section, this home will be acquired, leaving no persons exposed to significant levels of aircraft noise exposure. Number of Persons Exposed to Aircraft Noise

Note: 1994 and 1998 populations are as reported by the 1994 Part 150 Study. Population counts for 2007, 2013 and Ultimate cases are based on resident population in 2007.

MCI Noise Exposure Contours Noise Level 60 DNL

MCI MCI 2007 2007 Noise Noise Exposure Exposure Contours Contours

65 DNL

MCI MCI 2025 2025 Noise Noise Exposure Exposure Contours Contours

70 DNL 75 DNL MCI Property Boundary City Limits Single Family Residential

!

Acquire undeveloped land in parcels containing approximately 400 acres of land located within the 2013 NCP 65 DNL contour and located on the north side of Interstate-29

Rural Residential Medium Density Residential High Density Residential

MCI MCI 2013 2013 Noise Noise Exposure Exposure Contours Contours

.

This property will remain exposed to significant levels of aircraft noise for the foreseeable future. Its highest and best use is for non-residential development, but only through acquisition can the

Airport

assure

that

it

will

not

develop

incompatibly. !

Acquire one property of about 17 acres surrounded by airport property and located west of NW Hampton Road, south of the parallel runways. This measure continues a

recommendation of the previous Part 150 NCP. !

Acquire one parcel of approximately 60 acres lying within that area subject to 65 DNL for the combined north and south flow traffic conditions and located between the south boundary of the airport property and the north boundary of Tiffany Springs Park and west of NW Hampton Road. This property is located

between the Park and the Airport, and may eventually

6

be

acquired

for

Park

expansion.

Airport Acquisition Tiffany Springs Park Acquisition MCI Property Boundary City Limits

3

Land Use Management Element

They are designed with provisions to place greater

Because the noise exposure patterns beyond airport boundaries do not lend themselves to abatement through operational means, and because the current and projected noise patterns encompass very few residences within the area of exposure in excess of 60 DNL, the most effective means of mitigating incompatible uses is to prevent their development in the first place. The land use management element of the Noise Compatibility Program substantially modifies the previous Part 150 recommendations because the areas addressed are either no longer exposed to significant noise, have been acquired for aviation use, or have developed in other uses. The land use measures described below comprise a more general approach to the noise-sensitive development of the land in the airport environs, while providing for the acquisition of those properties that are now or will continue to be at risk for incompatible development in areas of significant noise exposure. The elements of the updated program are:

constraints on development as the intensity of the

!

Establish

Airport

Compatibility

noise becomes higher closer to aircraft flight paths. The interior zones are:

,

All Zones

: General measures applied in all

areas include:

,

1) Use collaborative review by the Aviation Department and appropriate planning agency of

development

proposals

within

district

boundaries. ,

2)

Discourage development of residential or

noise sensitive public uses within any tier area. ,

3) Require an airport noise area disclosure statement and over-flight easement (waiver of claim) on any parcel rezoned or subdivided for residential development.

,

Zone 4: Vacant, residentially or agriculturally zoned lands exposed to aircraft noise greater than 65 DNL (Kansas City only). Until acquired by the Airport under later measures, development

Overlay

of

Districts in Kansas City, Platte County and

. The overlay districts are intended to manage the development of incompatible uses within areas exposed to substantially elevated aircraft noise levels. Not all jurisdictions would be subject to each of the tiered zones within the Overlay District. No measure is intended to apply to properties that have already been platted. The table below indicates their application to each planning area.

Airport Compatibility Overlay Districts

any

new

incompatible

use

should

be

prohibited.

Platte City

,

Zone 3: Vacant, residentially or agriculturally zoned lands exposed to aircraft noise between 60 and 65 DNL (Kansas City and Platte County).

Commercial,

industrial

and

agricultural

use

should be encouraged. If specific zoning or subdivision proposals are ever approved, any development with a density greater than those allowed in agricultural zoning should be required to provide 25 decibels of exterior to interior sound reduction to achieve an interior DNL of not greater

Applicability of Airport Compatibility Overlay District Zones to Planning Jurisdictions

than 45 decibels. ,

Zone 3

Noise Kansas Platte Levels City County Not Applicable 65 DNL

All Zones Zone 1 Zone 2

4

Platte City

Zone 2: Property falling beyond the 60 DNL contour, but exposed to Maximum Noise Levels(Lmax) of 85 decibels or more as projected for a Boeing 737-700 aircraft (the most frequently projected aircraft in the future fleet at the Airport). The 85 decibel threshold is representative of the level at which sleep is disturbed. Encourage

build out of commercially or industrially zoned property and encourage new commercial or industrial

development.

Restrict

residential

development densities to not more than one unit in forty acres.

5

Land Use Management Element

They are designed with provisions to place greater

Because the noise exposure patterns beyond airport boundaries do not lend themselves to abatement through operational means, and because the current and projected noise patterns encompass very few residences within the area of exposure in excess of 60 DNL, the most effective means of mitigating incompatible uses is to prevent their development in the first place. The land use management element of the Noise Compatibility Program substantially modifies the previous Part 150 recommendations because the areas addressed are either no longer exposed to significant noise, have been acquired for aviation use, or have developed in other uses. The land use measures described below comprise a more general approach to the noise-sensitive development of the land in the airport environs, while providing for the acquisition of those properties that are now or will continue to be at risk for incompatible development in areas of significant noise exposure. The elements of the updated program are:

constraints on development as the intensity of the

!

Establish

Airport

Compatibility

noise becomes higher closer to aircraft flight paths. The interior zones are:

,

All Zones

: General measures applied in all

areas include:

,

1) Use collaborative review by the Aviation Department and appropriate planning agency of

development

proposals

within

district

boundaries. ,

2)

Discourage development of residential or

noise sensitive public uses within any tier area. ,

3) Require an airport noise area disclosure statement and over-flight easement (waiver of claim) on any parcel rezoned or subdivided for residential development.

,

Zone 4: Vacant, residentially or agriculturally zoned lands exposed to aircraft noise greater than 65 DNL (Kansas City only). Until acquired by the Airport under later measures, development

Overlay

of

Districts in Kansas City, Platte County and

. The overlay districts are intended to manage the development of incompatible uses within areas exposed to substantially elevated aircraft noise levels. Not all jurisdictions would be subject to each of the tiered zones within the Overlay District. No measure is intended to apply to properties that have already been platted. The table below indicates their application to each planning area.

Airport Compatibility Overlay Districts

any

new

incompatible

use

should

be

prohibited.

Platte City

,

Zone 3: Vacant, residentially or agriculturally zoned lands exposed to aircraft noise between 60 and 65 DNL (Kansas City and Platte County).

Commercial,

industrial

and

agricultural

use

should be encouraged. If specific zoning or subdivision proposals are ever approved, any development with a density greater than those allowed in agricultural zoning should be required to provide 25 decibels of exterior to interior sound reduction to achieve an interior DNL of not greater

Applicability of Airport Compatibility Overlay District Zones to Planning Jurisdictions

than 45 decibels. ,

Zone 3

Noise Kansas Platte Levels City County Not Applicable 65 DNL

All Zones Zone 1 Zone 2

4

Platte City

Zone 2: Property falling beyond the 60 DNL contour, but exposed to Maximum Noise Levels(Lmax) of 85 decibels or more as projected for a Boeing 737-700 aircraft (the most frequently projected aircraft in the future fleet at the Airport). The 85 decibel threshold is representative of the level at which sleep is disturbed. Encourage

build out of commercially or industrially zoned property and encourage new commercial or industrial

development.

Restrict

residential

development densities to not more than one unit in forty acres.

5

,

Zone 1: Property falling within the area

Should that happen, when the west parallel

exposed to Maximum Noise Levels of 80 decibels or more as projected for a Boeing 737700 aircraft (the most frequently forecast aircraft in the future fleet at the Airport), but not within the bounds of any other zone. Limit

runway is extended during Phase 2 of the Airport's Facility Development Program, the area would be subject to high environmental risk. Therefore, it is advisable that the land be acquired and banked for future Airport need as the airfield develops in future years.

development of residential uses to not more than three to five units per acre.

!

Encourage Kansas City Parks and Recreation Department to acquire approximately 143 acres north of Missouri Highway 152, as shown for acquisition by the Tiffany Springs Park Master Plan .

This property lies under or

between the approach paths from the south.

Its

adjacency to the Park argues for its inclusion in that community asset. Should it not be acquired, it should be considered for acquisition by the Airport to protect the proposed south entrance to the airfield. The proposed areas of acquisition are indicated on the exhibit below.

levels for the annual average condition (DNL). Noteworthy is the elimination of noise in excess of 65 DNL east of I-29 and the substantial reduction of contour sizes north and south of the airport. The maps below compare the 2007 noise contour of 65 DNLwith the pattern projected for the years 2013 and for the ultimate construction of facilities addressed by the concurrent Master Plan. Notably, there is little difference between the contours of 65 DNL over off-airport areas, but the contour of 60 DNL (moderate noise exposure) is widened by the addition of a third parallel runway west of the present facilities. The substantial reduction in the number of persons exposed to various ranges of aircraft noise reflects the changes in the way the airport has been used since the first Part 150 study, as well as the quieting of the air carrier fleet. By 2007, only one home remains within the 65 DNL contour, and with the

implementation of the recommendations of the Noise Compatibility Program discussed in the next section, this home will be acquired, leaving no persons exposed to significant levels of aircraft noise exposure. Number of Persons Exposed to Aircraft Noise

Note: 1994 and 1998 populations are as reported by the 1994 Part 150 Study. Population counts for 2007, 2013 and Ultimate cases are based on resident population in 2007.

MCI Noise Exposure Contours Noise Level 60 DNL

MCI MCI 2007 2007 Noise Noise Exposure Exposure Contours Contours

65 DNL

MCI MCI 2025 2025 Noise Noise Exposure Exposure Contours Contours

70 DNL 75 DNL MCI Property Boundary City Limits Single Family Residential

!

Acquire undeveloped land in parcels containing approximately 400 acres of land located within the 2013 NCP 65 DNL contour and located on the north side of Interstate-29

Rural Residential Medium Density Residential High Density Residential

MCI MCI 2013 2013 Noise Noise Exposure Exposure Contours Contours

.

This property will remain exposed to significant levels of aircraft noise for the foreseeable future. Its highest and best use is for non-residential development, but only through acquisition can the

Airport

assure

that

it

will

not

develop

incompatibly. !

Acquire one property of about 17 acres surrounded by airport property and located west of NW Hampton Road, south of the parallel runways. This measure continues a

recommendation of the previous Part 150 NCP. !

Acquire one parcel of approximately 60 acres lying within that area subject to 65 DNL for the combined north and south flow traffic conditions and located between the south boundary of the airport property and the north boundary of Tiffany Springs Park and west of NW Hampton Road. This property is located

between the Park and the Airport, and may eventually

6

be

acquired

for

Park

expansion.

Airport Acquisition Tiffany Springs Park Acquisition MCI Property Boundary City Limits

3

Noise Compatibility Program The KCI Noise Compatibility Program includes three distinct sections: a noise abatement element that carries forward previously approved aircraft operating procedures; a land use element that provides for land use management actions; and a program management element that sets forth efforts to administer, monitor and update the program.

Existing Noise Exposure Compared to 1998 Noise Exposure

!

Informal preferential runway use program to

. This program favors takeoffs to the north and landings from the south. Currently, the airport operates approximately 60% of the time in north flow and results in the louder departures taking off over largely vacant land to the north of the airport more than half of the time, and placing arrivals from the south along predictable straight-in approach corridors that avoided by incompatible residential development. favor north traffic flow

!

Informal nighttime runway use program with landings on Runways 1L and 19L and takeoffs

. This program favors nighttime (10 p.m. until 6 a.m.) activity to use the on Runways 1R and 19R

2

The implementation of the three Airport acquisitions will remove the potential for the development of noisesensitive incompatible uses within the areas exposed

!

to significant aircraft noise exposure (within the 65 DNL contour) through the projected activity levels for the year 2013. These actions will place the airport in the enviable position of owning its area of significant

!

impact as defined by federal regulation few large airports achieve that goal.

Noise Abatement Element

Initial evaluations of the noise exposure pattern present at the airport in 2007 indicate that significant noise, as defined by Federal regulation, is restricted to the airport, or to an area immediately north of the western of the two parallel north-south runways, and north of Interstate Highway 29. This pattern constitutes a substantial reduction in the size of the significantly exposed offairport lands projected by the first Part 150 Study for 1998. The reduction in contour size is a direct result of the mandated elimination of older, louder aircraft from the operating fleets of air carriers at the end of 1999 and their replacement by aircraft that operate under the quietest noise level guidance. Afurther influence on the reduction of the areas exposed to aircraft noise has been a considerable reduction in the use of the eastwest runway since the construction of the eastern parallel runway in the mid-1990s. Because modifications of aircraft activity must have a benefit within the area exposed to significant noise levels (65 decibels for the average day, or 65 DNL), and because the off-airport areas exposed to this level is so close to the runway end, little could be done to modify the activity patterns to reduce exposure in that area. Two measures that had been implemented after the 1993 Part 150 Study were recommended for continuation. They are:

!

Effects of Land Use Management Actions

These

jointly

Compatibility Overlay District.

Platte County, and by Platte City will place these three

establish

a

It assigns staff

responsibilities and relies on those staff to set a

jurisdictions squarely on the side of protecting their

schedule and process for efficient review of

substantial investment and labor center at the Airport

requests made to any of the three jurisdictions.

by discouraging the development of uses that will

Lmax to seek minimization of these potential conflicts.

Initiate an update of the Noise Exposure Maps everyfiveyearsor whenequivalent(daytime+ ten times nighttime) operations grow more than17percentabove2006levels),and Initiate an update of the Noise Compatibility Program every ten years or when/if equivalent (daytime + ten times nighttime) operations in any single year exceed that year's forecasts by more than 40 percent.

The acquisition of the property along Highway 152 for

planning

conflict with the Airport's ability to freely operate within the area airspace.

The introduction of residential or

!

other noise-sensitive facilities into the immediate environs of the Airport will often lead to elevated levels of public complaint about aircraft noise, even if the locations of those making complaints are well beyond the areas of significant noise exposure.

!

Hence, the

District regulations address development guidance on areas out to 60 DNL and outward to 80 decibels of

These two measures

assure that the efforts undertaken in the Part 150

park purposes will remove this acreage lying between

result

altitude from potential development in incompatible

flexible

enough

to

of

new

or

expanded

service,

route

substantial noise around the airport.

!

Program Management Element successful

Compatibility

implementation

Program

is

of

dependent

any

upon

airport to rapidly communicate to the public

the

expected changes or abnormalities at the airport, as well as general information about noise and

through on the recommended actions, as well to

other environmental issues that require public

recognize unanticipated conditions that may warrant

review and input.

reassessment of the program. Seven measures have been incorporated into the NCP Update

Establish environmental information the airport web site.

This service will allow the

Noise

commitment to a continuing effort to assure follow

!

remain

modification, or new development in areas of

uses.

The

process

address changing conditions that may arise as a

the approaches by aircraft at approximately 700 feet

The preceding map comparing 1998 and 2008 noise exposure patterns illustrates the reduction in the size of the noise pattern for 60, 65, 70 and 75 decibel levelsand south of the airport. The maps below compare the 2007 noise contour of 65 DNL with the

measures

may be proposed anywhere within the Airport

District regulations by the City of Kansas City, by

Effect of Noise Abatement Actions

three

formalized review of development actions that

The adoption of the Airport Compatibility Overlay

runways more remote from developed residential areas. The measure remains a voluntary part of the operating scheme at the airport and is continued as part of the Noise Compatibility Program. However, the preference of the cargo operators who are all located adjacent to the west parallel runway and frequently fly at night, to use the west parallel runway for all activity negates a substantial portion of the noise pattern shift that might have been attributable to this measure. Nevertheless, the contours of significant exposure levels do not extend far enough beyond the airport boundaries for this to have resulted in substantial land use/aircraft noise conflicts.

Designate airport staff position as liaison contact for noise and land use coordination withplanningagencies,and Designate planning staff position as liaison contact for noise and land use coordination withAirport,and Implement review process for development proposals within the land use compatibility zones approved within any jurisdiction.

Maintain system for receiving and responding to noise complaints.

Cost and Funding

The success of the Noise

The cost of implementing the Noise Compatibility

Compatibility Program requires a continuing effort

Program is estimated to be $3,529,000 (2008 dollars)

to

in

monitor

compliance

and

identify

new

or

one-time

expenditures

and

approximately

The airport has a well

$102,000 annually, excluding administrative costs for

organized system of recording and responding to

collaborative planning by the planning jurisdictions to

noise complaints.

It is important for the airport

evaluate land use proposals. Of the one-time costs,

management to acknowledge and respond to

approximately $2,320,000 would be eligible for grant

complaints, even if it is not possible to take

reimbursement

remedial action.

Administration,

unanticipated conditions.

from while

the

Federal

$700,000

would

Av i a t i o n be

the

7

responsibility $429,000

of

the

Airport,

and

would

be

a

to

Recreation Department.

cost

approximately

the

Parks

and

Consequently, the cost to

local governmental bodies would be approximately $1,129,000 in one-time expenditures over the next five years, and $510,000 in continuing expenditures for staff and management support of a designated staff liaison for noise and community planning needs.

8

Cost and Funding of Noise Compatibility Program Measures

Purpose of the Study

What is a 14 CFR Part 150?

The Kansas City Aviation Department determined to update its 1994 Part 150 Study to assure that the programs that had been implemented at that time were still appropriate to conditions in 2007. Areas around the airport have been rapidly developing in residential uses that are not generally considered to be compatible with aircraft operations. Further, a number of the key land use management recommendations of the earlier plan were not fully implemented. The airport is a significant public investment and valuable economic resource to the metropolitan region that should be protected from uses that may encroach upon its ability to respond to the regional needs. The purpose of conducting a Part 150 Study update at an airport is to develop a balanced, costeffective plan to reduce current aircraft noise impacts over noise-sensitive land uses and, where practical, to limit the potential for future noise impacts. By following the Part 150 regulations, the airport sponsor is assured of FAA cooperation through the involvement of air traffic control professionals and FAA review of the recommended NCP. An airport with an FAA-approved NCP also becomes eligible to make application for funding assistance to implement the NCP measures. Among the general goals and objectives to be addressed in a Part 150 Study are the following:  To reduce, where feasible, existing and forecasted noise levels over existing noisesensitive land uses;  To reduce the introduction of new noise-sensitive land uses near the airport;  To mitigate, where feasible, adverse impacts in accordance with Federal guidelines;  To provide mitigation measures that are sensitive to the needs of the community and its stability;  To minimize the impact of mitigation measures on local tax bases; and  To be consistent, where feasible, with local land use planning and development policies.

Part 150 is a section of the Federal Code of Regulations for Aviation that sets forth the requirements and guidelines for airports desiring to undertake airport noise compatibility planning or mitigation with Federal funding assistance. Part 150 outlines a planning process and requires the development of two products: Noise Exposure Maps and a Noise Compatibility Program. Noise Exposure Maps are prepared to illustrate airport noise exposure patterns for the existing condition and a forecast condition five years after the date of submission of the maps for FAAreview. Maps were prepared for the baseline year 2007 and forecast for 2013. A Noise Compatibility Program includes provisions for the abatement of aircraft noise through aircraft operating actions or land use management controls. These actions are intended to mitigate the impact of aircraft noise on existing incompatible land uses and manage the development of vacant lands to assure that incompatible uses do not develop in the future. The program also must contain provisions for updating and periodic revision. Airport Environs

1

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