at the library a manual

Volunteers at the library – a manual VOLUNTEERS at the LIBRARY Contents Foreword Partnership model - Tulipan Project background Partnership mo...
Author: Julian Lloyd
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Volunteers

at the library – a manual

VOLUNTEERS at the

LIBRARY

Contents Foreword

Partnership model - Tulipan

Project background

Partnership model - Trekløver

Reading guide

Similarities of both partnership models

A volunteer at Billund Libraries

The volunteers’ work

Codes for partnership and partnership agreements

Volunteer profile

Codes for partnership

Plan for skill advancement/ training

Partnership agreement with volunteers

A volunteer at Ikast-Brande Library

Volunteer profile

Closing remarks

Presentation of partnership models

More information

Volunteers at the library - a manual Prepared by the project team: Dan Heinsen, Inger Donslund, Anette Skjønnemand, Lone Ugelvig, Inger Enevoldsen, Annette Rosendal Nielsen and Ilse Christensen at Ikast-Brande Library and Billund Libraries, in conjunction with Lisbeth Galtung, Herning Libraries and Henrik Jochumsen and Michael Kristiansen, IVA. Evaluation and the manual is supported by funding from the Development pool of the Culture Department, Centre for Library, Media and Digitalisation 2012. Fotos: Projektgruppen. Grafik og tryk: Buchs.dk - 2013.

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Foreword This manual has been created to provide inspiration and practical guidance on how libraries and cultural institutions can work with volunteers. The foundation of the manual comes from data collection, observations, analysis and dialogue from volunteers and library staff. The essence of the project is that library professionals and volunteers want the same thing: namely the greater involvement of volunteers in library life and an exploration into the optimum conditions for local libraries, not least in smaller communities. Forming partnerships with volunteers gives us the opportunity to offer a library service that is best suited to its community. We can develop new opportunities and offerings based on input from our volunteers, allowing them to serve as ambassadors in the local area. In this way we can gain access to a large network of people we would otherwise find difficult to reach. Public institutions, in almost all areas, have in recent years focused on the involvement of volunteers. It is therefore our hope that this manual can also provide inspiration to people outside the library and cultural professions who also plan to or have already partnered with volunteers. Ole Bisbjerg Head of Library and Community Services Billund Kommune

Martin Lundsgaard-Leth Library Manager Ikast-Brande library

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Project background “Active citizenship: Development and evaluation of partnership models with volunteers” For many municipalities it has become necessary to make savings in various areas, which often leads to service degradation for its residents. Therefore it is relevant to examine how volunteers can help reverse this trend and make the small local community more attractive. Libraries in Billund and Ikast-Brande have benefitted from various types of partnerships with active volunteers who want to support their local communities. With the support of the Culture Department, this project examined how libraries can use volunteers as additional resources in professional settings and how partnerships between libraries and volunteers can help to support and energise small communities and hopefully increase library usage. The project’s objective has been to identify and systematise current practice and compare and develop sustainable models for partnerships between professionals and volunteers. In this manual we describe the most important lessons learned from the project, which ran between 2012-2013, and present different models of partnership.

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Reading Guide The purpose of this manual is to share the experiences of Ikast-Brande and Billund libraries which were gathered during the project period. Therefore, it is the project group’s recommendations that form the basis of this manual. Our aim is to offer a “Do It Yourself” volunteer guide so interested libraries can use it in their own work with volunteers. Among other things, you will find two different partnership models that highlight how the work of volunteers can be organised, a code of partnership and a plan for skill advancement/training, etc. Our intention is that you choose the information that is most relevant to your situation. The manual also includes two stories from volunteers who talk about their daily life in the two different libraries. In addition, there are also two volunteer profiles, that feature fictional people pieced together from information gathered in a survey involving 65 volunteers and a subsequent

focus group of four volunteers. The quotes in the profile section are taken directly from the focus group interviews. The project created a total of four volunteer profiles, but in this manual we chose to include two. The other two profiles can be found on our blog. These profiles are useful in drawing up action plans for recruitment, acknowledgement and retention of volunteers, etc. The target audience for this manual are staff and volunteers who work in libraries and politicians who are working on how we can optimise partnerships between the public and voluntary sectors. We have gained a wealth of knowledge and experience through this project, so please check out our blog – www.projekt-aktivt-medborgerskab.dk - for more information and inspiration! Here you will find a comprehensive report, with various appendices, and an evaluation of the report.

Happy reading! Project Group: Dan, Inger, Lone, Inger, Annette and Ilse

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Volunteers at the library - a story from a

Volunteer at Billund Libraries “When I arrive at the library and the first thing I see is the granite book sculpture with our slogan “Meet yourself and the whole world at the library”, I’m happy that the 26 volunteers stepped forward when the library was threatened with closure. Twice a week we collect books and other reserved material from a reservation list sent via email from Magion Library. Then a volunteer driver takes our collected books to Grindsted and brings back our patron’s reservations, new books and materials in return. The driver immediately places the reserved material in numerical order on a shelf for patrons to pick up. Twice a week, other volunteers place the returned books back on the shelves, hang posters and announcements up and make exhibitions of current books, etc.

We have so many volunteers that we can make a timetable with two or three people working a two-hour shift every 14 days. This means that we’re not committed for a long period, freeing members in each group to take holiday or a break if needed. We also help the customers when they come to the library if need be. There’s no doubt that people miss a trained librarian but on the other hand, we have a library that is open from 8am-10pm every day all year round.”

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Code for partnership and collaboration In our experience it is important to clarify the expectations of both volunteers and staff when it comes to volunteer work at the library. Therefore, we recommend that new volunteers should be introduced to the codes of partnership and collaboration during their initial interview. Our code and partnership agreement clarify both the rights and obligations inherent in voluntary work and focuses on the mutual expectations between the library and volunteers. There is an additional obligation for both parties because they have to sign a partnership agreement. As the code of partnership and partnership agreement form the basis of the future partnership, it is important that it is discussed and approved by both the volunteer group and staff group.

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Code of partnership with volunteers at your Library

Introduction Working with volunteers in libraries is an area of development. Active citizens who involve themselves in meaningful volunteer work bring life to their library, as well as strengthening their local community. Purpose This code aims to clarify expectations and boundaries of partnership between library employees and volunteers. Definition of volunteering Your library supports the definition of volunteering put forth by the Social and Integration Ministry’s Volunteer Committee, devised at John Hopkins: When a person performs works without physical, financial or legal coercion. The work shall be initially unpaid, however can be given symbolic numeration. The work is to be performed for the benefit of anyone other than yourself and your immediate family.

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What can your library offer volunteers? The volunteers will be given respect and recognition by the professional employees. The volunteers will have the opportunity to use their professional and social skills in cooperation with the library employees. The volunteers will have the opportunity to suggest activities. What volunteers can offer your library? The volunteers provide knowledge and commitment to the creation and development of activities. The volunteers provide inspiration and new ideas to the library. The volunteers are great ambassadors for the library and publicise their knowledge of the library through their own networks. Partnership The mutual expectations must always be in focus and there must be a clear framework for the partnership.

Recruitment, skills and retention The volunteers should match the demand for skills in relation to the library’s current tasks. Efforts should be made to have a wide variety of volunteers in relation to gender, age and background. It is important that the volunteers feel a sense of responsibility towards their tasks. This has a positive impact on retention, so volunteers should be involved as early as possible in decision making on new tasks. Expectations of volunteers The partnership agreement specifies a number of expectations that the volunteers need to be made aware of.

Expectations of employees The library staff should be motivating and helpful in supporting the commitment of the volunteers. Employees should be open to the ideas the volunteers provide. Positive communication, both written and verbal, are essential for a successful partnership. The volunteer should be well informed about the library’s services, activities and new initiatives.

Law It is important for each individual library to check their municipality insurance to confirm if volunteers are covered regarding accidents at workplace, etc. The volunteer must check the conditions of their own insurance policy. The volunteer is responsible for understanding the consequences of volunteering, by contacting their A-kasse, union, job centre, etc.

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Partnership agreement with volunteers at your library By entering into this agreement, both parties commit to a partnership in accordance with the “Code of working with volunteers at [your library name]”

As a volunteer at [your library name], I agree: • To familiarise myself with the “Code of working with volunteers at [your library name]” • To carry out agreed tasks • To stay informed on important facts about tasks and the library • To contribute to creating a positive and inspiring environment with respect for members of the public, library staff and other volunteers • To inform my contact person when I cannot come to work • To inform my contact person if I want a break from work or want to stop volunteering at the library • To be aware that the information regarding library users is confidential • To accept that I may be asked to stop volunteering if I do not meet the above expectations • To receive key No.xx to the library. The key is not to be used by anyone else and only in connection with the agreed volunteering at the library

Signature of both parties

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Volunteering at the library - a profile

Ove is 62 years old and is a retired school teacher. Interested in IT, computers, photography and the occasional fishing trip. Has not previously been a regular library user.

Ove became a volunteer when a neighbour told him that the library lacked volunteers who could teach IT. Ove is very proud of his lessons and appreciates being part of a network, so now he has begun to have “on-call hours” where he is especially keen on helping users at the self-service machine and searching the net. His knowledge of literature isn’t great but he feels his knowledge on how to use the internet effectively is a skill that many visitors are interested in learning. Ove thinks volunteering is great way to use his professional IT knowledge and is happy to participate in the activities conducted by the library, both by teaching and working shifts. Ove is being helped with his work at the library with another volunteer and that has been enjoyable. He has even approached one of the librarians to better understand bibliotek.dk and learn more about e-Reolen (e-books) and netlydbog (online audio books). He now passes on his new-found knowledge to library visitors. Ove has a concern about his status as an early retiree now he is volunteering at the library. He was given advice to contact his union and unemployment fund for clarity about the issue but he has not got around to it.

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Ove is satisfied with the current information and communication he receives but he also thinks establishing one or two annual events covering professional subjects would keep volunteers more informed about the library profession. Ove has given much thought to being a library volunteer and his relationship with the employees:

’’

“We are used to volunteer work, but it is new that we are being asked to do community work such as library tasks. We are talking about creating a level of collective responsibility which you as a citizen are responsible for and part of creating. It is a difficult process. It is important to create a platform and establish boundaries for ownership of the different tasks. The beauty of the current process is that people take responsibility for themselves… I see it as something positive that is taking place. It doesn’t matter that you have to take the responsibility to learn about what is going on yourself, and not just blaming the municipality.”

The best recognition is when the members of the public you have helped are happy and satisfied. If you then, as a volunteer, could wish for something new for the local library it would be a really nice appreciation of the volunteers efforts.

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Presentation of partnership models Here we present two models of partnership, compiled from the project team’s knowledge and recommendations. There is also a list of the volunteers’ tasks in the six library branches. The first partnership model is organised with volunteers as coordinators, while the other features library staff as primary coordinators. The diversity is reflected most strongly in the assignments of the volunteers, although there are certain tasks that are repeated in each library.

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Partnership model -Tulipan Case study This model is best utilised when there is a threatened closure of branches in smaller communities and there is (or it is possible to establish) a strong volunteer group with great commitment. The branches were well attended and had stable lending statistics. Advantages: The two professional coordinators are each other’s sounding board and provide cover when the other is absent, and this provides a clear, uniform and stable line of contact between the library and the volunteer group. The volunteers have a high degree of ownership of the library. The model works best where there are two branches and voluntary groups. Disadvantages: There is a risk of loss of information between the professional coordinators and the volunteer groups. The volunteer coordinator’s position can easily become a ‘bottleneck’ in the flow of tasks and information. There is a risk the volunteer group becomes closed in on itself. When there is more than three branches, this model can become vulnerable when there is only two professional staff assigned to the volunteers. Important: In this model it is important the volunteer group is capable of assuming a high level of responsibility and tasks, as in the case of “open libraries” where there is no professional help. This requires a volunteer who is able to take on a coordinator role.

> VOLUNTEERING MANUAL · 15

Organising Two professional librarians are joint coordinators for the volunteers at the self-service libraries • One has a primary responsibility for the practical tasks • The other has a primary responsibility for communication, in the form of sending out newsletters Communicating directly with the volunteer group, the professional coordinators plan and organise tasks for the volunteers, participate in volunteer group meetings as needed and provide guidance in problem solving. They are also involved in reporting on the work of the volunteers to the rest of the organisation. A volunteer coordinator oversees the volunteer group in every local library, serves as a project manager within certain areas, is the contact person in charge of internal communication within the volunteer group and devises a work roster. Has responsibility for the introduction of the new volunteers. Holds regular meetings of the volunteer group and reports the proceedings to the professional coordinator.

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Procedure when a volunteer is assigned to a library • Interview - Introduction of new volunteers takes place by interview with the volunteer coordinator. - Volunteer will be given a list of the other volunteers, work roster, code of partnership for volunteers, partnership agreement and a welcome letter with practical information. - They are informed about obtaining a child protection certificate (Børneattest) if their voluntary work involves them coming into contact with children.

• Mentoring/ job training Each volunteer will be placed in a volunteer group where new members are trained on how to perform their tasks and helped to increase their knowledge. The volunteers will be introduced to the group by the volunteer coordinator.

Volunteer care • Invitations The professional coordinator sends out invitations to social events of a vocational nature twice a year. • Appreciation Recognition takes place in newsletters and personal interviews with the volunteers. Volunteers will have the opportunity to put forward ideas for improvement. Management decides whether they will be granted. • Retention The tasks should be tailored to the strength of the individual volunteer.

• Newsletters The professional coordinator sends a newsletter directly to each local library volunteer around six times a year. These newsletters contain news from the local libraries, as well as new library initiatives set forth by the local municipality. • Group Events Twice a year, a communal event is arranged for all the library volunteers in the municipality. The professional coordinator plans the content of the event in collaboration with the library management. The event can include training to increase knowledge in a specific task and refreshments are served.

Strategy for communication with the volunteers • Meetings Volunteer coordinators at each library can call meetings as they see fit, but it must be a minimum of 2-3 times a year. A professional coordinator must attend.

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Partnership model - Trekløver Case study 1 This model is most effectively used at a one-person operated branch that will see its hours reduced and where a strong volunteer group want to maintain an extra opening day a week, in addition to the professional opening hours. Advantages: There is a high level of communication between the professional contact person and the volunteers. The volunteers are regular users of the library and add focus to the level of professionalism of the employees, as well as being important sounding boards when new initiatives are started. The cooperation between volunteers and professionals provides a great synergy in the workplace. More things are possible when there are plenty of people to carry out the tasks. Disadvantages: There is a risk that the administrative coordinator does not have enough contact and is therefore out of touch with what is taking place with the voluntary groups. There is also the chance that the volunteer groups will not work on creating a roster and/or other practical tasks, possibly leading to a loss of commitment and enthusiasm. Important: This model requires clear communication between the professional coordinator and the volunteer group.

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Case Study 2 This model is best used in several branches that turned into “open libraries” without professional support and volunteers wanted to “lend a hand” in order to offer the opportunity of personal service at the selfservice desk. The branches witnessed declining visiting numbers and lending figures for some years and while the volunteer group did not wish to take on more responsibility, they were happy to be involved in new tasks, such as events. Advantages: The library staff contacts are responsible for the coordination of their own volunteer group, while also acting as sounding boards for issues and suggestions amongst each. The administrative coordinator oversees the overall coordination and information, therefore ensuring consistency. This model works well where there are three or more branches and voluntary groups. Disadvantages: There is a risk that the administrative coordinator does not have enough contact and is therefore out of touch with what is taking place with the voluntary groups. There is also the chance that the volunteer groups will not work on creating a roster and/or other practical tasks, possibly leading to a loss of commitment and enthusiasm. Important: This model requires clear communication between the professional coordinator and the volunteer group.

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Organisation One administrative coordinator from the library (an employee) is responsible for newsletters, invitations to events, planning of theme days, as well as consistent volunteer acknowledgement. Ensures that working with volunteers is on the agenda of both staff and management meetings. One contact person for each local library which has volunteers (an employee) is responsible for direct contact, in charge of holding meetings as necessary and visits the local libraries on a weekly basis. Scheduling takes place in partnership with the volunteer group. Procedure when a volunteer is assigned to a library • Interview Introduction of new volunteers takes place by interview with the staff contact and they are assessed as to whether they have the skills appropriate to the available tasks. The volunteers are encouraged to participate in problem solving and to think of new ideas for action. They are informed about obtaining a child protection certificate (Børneattest) if their voluntary work involves them coming into contact with children.

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Volunteers shall be handed: Code of partnership for volunteers, partnership agreement and list of work tasks at the individual library and their description.

• Mentoring/ job training The volunteer is offered the chance to take a shift with a professional employee at one of the staffed libraries. The volunteer is offered the chance of having a experienced volunteer mentor them. • Mail Groups The professional coordinator ensures that the new volunteers are added to the volunteers mail group. Volunteer Care • Invitations The administrative coordinator sends out invitations to library events to all volunteers around 14 days before they are due to take place.

• Appreciation and gifts Volunteers have the option to request something for the library through their local contact person. The administrative coordinator is responsible for the administration of a consistent acknowledgement/ gift policy

Strategy for communication with volunteers

• Retention Personal meetings are important. Tasks that can be performed by volunteers that improve the library’s service are a priority. The volunteers’ own ideas for new initiatives and tasks are prioritised.

• Mail groups The administrative coordinator creates mail groups for each volunteer group, as well as a collective group for all volunteers. The mail group is used to send out newsletters, invitations, etc.

• Meetings The professional contact person is responsible for direct contact and holding local meetings as necessary. Volunteers are encouraged to be proactive with new ideas.

• Newsletters The administrative coordinator shall create general newsletters with news and stories from the library. This will be complemented with news from the local contact person, covering both employees and volunteers. • Homepage The administrative coordinator will publish to the library website, including an overview of the volunteers’ tasks and content to attract new volunteers.

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Similarities of both partnership models: Expectations and demands For employees Respect and attention shown to volunteers both in personal contact and by telephone. Courtesy and positivity towards the volunteers’ ideas for new initiatives and solutions to problems. Each contact person must prioritise direct contact. Remember to inform the volunteers if the system is down of if there is another irregular event that affects the workplace.

For management The partnership between volunteers and staff is to be the focus both in everyday work life and in staff and management meetings. The volunteers must be treated with respect and appreciation. Management is responsible for incorporating the volunteers into the library’s personnel policy and the volunteers should be given the opportunity to comment on their work situation through a recurring “APV” assessment – a “voluntary task assessment”. For volunteers The volunteers shall respect the library’s vision and core values, as well as the staff’s professional skills, being aware of how to pass on queries to a professional staff member when necessary. Volunteers shall take responsibility for their tasks and meet the partnership agreement points.

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Farewell to a volunteer: If a volunteer has worked for more than two years, they are given a farewell bouquet/ gift.

If the issues cannot be resolved, then the volunteer must be let go. The head of the library or the volunteer coordinator makes the final call and a clear reason for the decision must be given.

If a volunteer does not “fit” The volunteer coordinator or staff contact person shall have a meeting with the volunteer. The interview should discuss which of the tasks the volunteer has been under-performing in and what the problem might be. Look for other tasks the volunteer might be better suited to. If it is decided that the problem can be resolved, set a time to meet again to discuss, ideally in two months time.

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24 · VOLUNTEERING MANUAL x x x x

Help find materials in the library Help find materials on the library website Help find materials on www.bibliotek.dk Communicate by telephone to a library employee

x

Find material on the reservation list and place them in the box

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Print reservation list

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Transport material

Place materials in their place

Receive handed-in material

x

x

x

x

Bording

Materials

Ejstrupholm x

Engesvang

x

x

Advise visitors on using the self-service computer

Tulipan model

Vorbasse

Hold and organise meetings for volunteers

x

Nr.Snede

Open and close the library

General

The volunteers’ tasks

Trekløver model

This table shows the different volunteer tasks allocated across the six libraries

Volunteers work tasks

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Sdr. Omme

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x

x

x

x

x x

Give notice of technical/ practical deficiencies

x

x Practical help with re-arrangement of library or other special tasks

x Volunteers are responsible for preparing the roster

Create roster in collaboration with library staff

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Check entrance for old posters

x

x

x

x

Tidy up

x

Tidy shelves

x

Correct books on shelf

Various practical tasks

Hang up posters around town

x

x

Arrange and manage “homework cafes”

x

x

x

Arrange and manage information spots, possibly in cooperation with others

x

x

x

x

Hang up posters in the library

x

Prepare and send PR to press in collaboration with library staff

x

x

x

Manage events

x

Make exhibitions

x

Participate in events

Exhibitions and events

Help with paying fees on the website

x

x

Switch out periodicals

Fines and Fees

x

Place reservations in numerical order on the shelf

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

Volunteers at the library - a profile

Marie is 73 years old and is a retired nurse. Marie’s interests are healthy eating and living and exercise. Marie has always enjoyed gymnastics and playing badminton and she still takes part in gymnastics and swimming. Marie has been a frequent visitor to the library all of her life for academic books about health and food, as well as for leisure reading, novels, biographies and travel literature. Marie was widowed a year ago and a good friend introduced her to the volunteer group at the library. Marie volunteers every week and enjoys giving visitors recommendations for novels and biographies. The visitors appreciate Marie’s vast knowledge of literature, something she loves talking about and inspiring people with. Marie isn’t so keen with placing the material back on the shelves but she does enjoy planning and making arrangements. When Marie is on duty at the library, she is often in telephone contact with a member of library staff, as there are many things she is unsure about. She always feels she is treated in a friendly and welcoming manner by the library staff, and this makes her happy even though this is to be expected.

’’

“We have librarians with us but I can see why the volunteers are a little scared about what it would be like without the professional library staff. They constantly make the necessary inputs, most of which the volunteers aren’t equipped to perform. It’s important to keep them.”

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The training she received when she started as a volunteer was from a librarian who provided her with a written job description. Marie did not feel this was sufficient. Firstly, she cannot remember all the information she was told during her first meeting and she also doesn’t quite understand the mission statement. Marie would have liked a little more training and more frequent information and contact from her professional coordinator.

’’

“I would like it if the volunteers could be given some more digital training with regards to the loaning of books, etc. We could use a refresher… I would be so much more confident if we had a follow-up twice a year.”

The volunteer group dynamic and communication works well, believes Marie. Being able to make visitors happy by providing them with ideas for books is crucial for Marie’s commitment to the volunteer group.

’’

“For me, the satisfaction comes when a visitor has seen the light – that by visiting the library there are many possibilities that they have never considered before.”

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Plan for skills advancement/ training When volunteers and staff work in partnership at the library, both parties need to continually develop their skills in order to obtain positive results. The volunteers need to acquire knowledge so they can provide a qualified and service-minded experience for the library visitors, while the employees need to better understand how to manage the volunteers. Volunteer coordination is a professional discipline that requires training, with special attention paid to coordination and management. It is important that skills which need special attention with regards to training are identified. When library employees have acquired these skills it provides a boost for the entire organisation, allowing it to become better qualified to enter into other partnerships around various activities and initiatives. The starting point of our plan to improve the skills of our staff and volunteers is our own experience, but we have also drawn inspiration from several books: “Ledelse af frivillige – en håndbog (Management Of Volunteers – A Handbook)” by Rie Frilund Skårhøj and Dorthe Kappelgaard, Ankerhus 2011 and “Frivilligkoordinering – hvorfor og hvordan (Volunteer Coordination – Why and How)” by Fredrik C. Boll, Nana G. Alsted and Jakob M. Hald, Ankerhus 2012.

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Employees who work with volunteers Employees should be offered training so they have a basic knowledge of how to: • Provide an overview and define frameworks • Be mindful of the volunteers’ well-being • Motivate and recognise the volunteers and their effort • Promote the development of new initiatives and delegate responsibility to the volunteers • Continuously communicate what is taking place in the workplace, both among staff and volunteers, and be instrumental in the creation of community among staff and volunteers • Switch between positions, so volunteers can sometimes lead initiatives in the start-up phase, then mentor and spark debate • Manage leadership both above and below you • Manage conflicts • Be a moderator Together with their immediate superior, each employee evaluates the courses he/ she both wants

and needs to take, depending on the degree of contact with volunteers. It could also involve debating with other staff at the library or municipality.

• Bibliotek.dk and various online library services, for example: Netlydbog, e-Reolen, Filmstriben, Litteratursiden, Lektier Online, eKurser.nu, etc.

Volunteers To be offered training and skills acquisition so that they have a basic knowledge of: • How to act as service-minded library ambassadors • The library’s layout, materials and configuration • The library’s website and library events • How to operate the library’s self-lending and returns system • How to search in the library’s own database (reserve material, fines, etc.) • When it is appropriate to contact the professional staff

Volunteers in charge of volunteer coordination • How to coordinate, motivate, acknowledge and lead volunteers, using the same skill advancement as offered to the library staff who have contact with volunteers.

Depending on the volunteer’s duties, it may also be necessary for additional training. Volunteers in the open libraries • How to help a new user in creating a library profile via NemID

Volunteer tutors • Bibliotek.dk, Lektier Online and Palles Gavebod • Read-aloud books for the younger audience Event volunteers • Preparation of posters • Preparation of press releases and advertisements Technical volunteers • Working with digital pictures, smartphones, tablets, e-book readers, etc. • Various online services such as Netlydbog (audio books), e-Reolen (e-books), Filmstriben (free movie streaming), Litteratursiden (books and literature website), Lektier Online (homework resources), eKurser.nu (online education courses), etc. • NemID and borger.dk VOLUNTEERING MANUAL · 29

Volunteers at the library - a story from a

Volunteer at Ikast-Brande Library

“Because of the budget cuts with the library, it had to close one day a week, meaning it was now open just twice a week. The local library association and the volunteers made it possible for Ikast-Brande Library to stay open for a third day; today the volunteers have made it possible for the library to be open on Thursdays. We prepare the library for use, starting the PCs up, directing people to the correct shelves and helping them search for material, as well as contacting librarians in Brande and Ikast. We also come up with ideas for activities and help put them into action: read-aloud books, homework club, “Bogcafe” (Book café) and other events. We believe it is especially important for the volunteers to have respect for the librarian’s expertise and skills, and that in return they respect our local knowledge and commitment – that happens here and we thrive.”

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Closing remarks The manual provides information and experiences we have selected as the most relevant. We have acquired far more knowledge than is possible to publish in this manual, so if you want to find out more you can download the final report, including appendices, and an evaluation of the report at the blog www.projekt-aktivt-medborgerskab.dk On the blog you will also find stakeholder analysis, a bibliography, code of partnership, partnership agreement and much more. Throughout the course of putting together the project, we have received invaluable advice and constructive criticism from Henrik Jochumsen and Michael Kristiansen at IVA – big thanks to you both.

For more information contact: Project manager Ilse Christensen, librarian, [email protected] - Ikast-Brande Library Project contributor Annette Rosendal Nielsen, librarian, [email protected] - Ikast-Brande Library Project contributor Lone Ugelvig, librarian, [email protected] - Billund Libraries Project contributor Inger Enevoldsen, librarian, [email protected] - Billund Libraries Project contributor Dan Heinsen, volunteer, [email protected] - Nørre Snede Library Project contributor Inger Donslund, volunteer, [email protected] - Vorbasse Library Martin Lundsgaard-Leth, Library Manager, [email protected] - Ikast-Brande Library Ole Bisbjerg, Head of Library and Community Services, [email protected] - Billund Libraries

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Volunteers

at the library – a manual

Volunteering at the

LIBRARY