Asking Questions About Stories

Lesson 5 Part 1: Introduction CCSS Asking Questions About Stories RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referri...
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Lesson 5

Part 1: Introduction

CCSS

Asking Questions About Stories

RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Theme: Discoveries

It’s important to keep track of what’s going on in a story by asking questions as you read. The answers to some questions can be found in one sentence of the story. Think of them as “right-there” questions. To answer other questions, you may need to think about and search for details in different parts of the story. Think of these as “think-andsearch” questions. Let’s practice this. Read the following paragraph. Erika was doing her homework. Her pencil rolled off the desk and under the bed. She was under the bed looking for it when she saw an old wooden box she had never seen before. How did that get there? she asked herself. When Erika opened it, she saw gold coins glittering in the dim light. “Wow!” she said, “I think it’s a treasure chest.” Write a question that could be answered by details in this paragraph. Underline the parts of the paragraph where you can find your answer. Look at the chart to see how a “right-there” question and a “think-and-search” question can be answered by looking at story details. Question Right-There Question: What does Erika find under the bed? Think-and-Search Question: Why does Erika think she has found a treasure chest?

Story Details

Answer

“She was under the bed looking for it when she saw an old wooden box she had never seen before.”

Erika finds an old wooden box under her bed that she has never seen before.

“When Erika opened it, she saw gold coins glittering in the dim light.”

Erika thinks she has found a treasure chest because treasure chests in stories are often filled with gold coins.

Good readers ask questions about what’s happening in a story and whom it’s happening to. They also ask questions about where and why the events happen. L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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Part 2: Modeled Instruction

Lesson 5

Read the first part of a story about a girl and her grandmother. Genre: Realistic Fiction

Grandma’s Secret 

by Kat Williams

Annie dreamed of being a famous singer. She and her grandmother both liked watching TV shows that made real people into singing stars. One night Grandma brought down a box from the attic. “I’d like to show you some old photographs,” she said. “I think you might find them interesting.” One photo showed four girls singing on a stage. Their hair was done up, and they wore matching dresses. “Who are those people?” Annie asked. “That’s me on the right,” Grandma said. Annie looked closely. “I see you! What are you doing?” “I’m singing on a TV show with my group, The Wildflowers,” Grandma said.

(continued)

Explore how to answer this question: “What is shown in the photograph that Annie looks at with Grandma?” What kind of question is this? It’s a “think-and-search” question. To find the answer, you need to look at several details in the story and put them together. Look for story details that help you identify what is in the photo. Two details are provided for you below. Write one more detail on the lines. Then fill in the blanks in the Answer column. Story Details

Answer

• “One photo showed four girls singing on a stage.” • “That’s me on the right,” Grandma said. • 

  



  



  

The photo shows Grandma with her group, The

.

The details that answer the question are in three different sentences. By putting these details together, you can answer the question about what the photo shows.

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Part 3: Guided Instruction

Lesson 5

Continue reading about Annie and her grandmother. Use the Close Reading and the Hint to help you answer the question.

Close Reading What does Grandma tell Annie about the song she sang on TV? Underline sentences that tell how she came to sing on TV.

(continued from page 46)

“It was 40 years ago,” Grandma said. “We recorded a song, and it played on the radio. It was so popular that we were asked to sing it on TV.” “Why didn’t you tell me this before?” asked Annie. Grandma smiled. “Oh, I guess I haven’t thought about it for a long time.” Now it was Annie’s turn to smile. “So, Grandma, what else have you done that you haven’t told me about?”

Hint Why were The Wildflowers asked to sing on TV?

Circle the correct answer. Why did Grandma sing a song on TV? A The Wildflowers asked her to sing with them. B Her group had a popular song on the radio. C She won a contest on a TV show. D She heard about the TV show on the radio.

Show Your Thinking Pick one of the answers you did not choose. Tell why you think it does not answer the question correctly. Think of another question that can be answered by reading the story. Ask your partner the question. Then discuss which details from the story help answer the question.

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Part 4: Guided Practice

Lesson 5

Read the story. Use the Study Buddy and the Close Reading to guide your reading. Genre: Realistic Fiction

from “A Boy Called Everest” by Jennifer R. Hubbard, Cricket 1 I’m going to write down my questions when I reread this story. For example, I wonder how Everest keeps from falling when he steps off the cliff.

step, and my mother knew it. My father’s friends could’ve taught me what I needed to know, but she wouldn’t allow it. 2

She didn’t know that I went anyway. I taught myself the basics on boulders and small rockfaces, learned about handholds and toeholds and balance. By the time I was fifteen, I was climbing regularly. I bought gear and hid

Close Reading How does Everest learn to climb? Underline two sentences that tell about learning the basics of climbing.

I was forbidden to climb rocks. Rock climbing was the first

it from her, keeping some of it at my friend Scott’s house. 3

My father named me Everest. People are always asking if I’m named after the mountain. “That’s right,” I tell them.

4

My friend Scott’s father knew that my dad had been a big-time mountaineer, so he believed me when I said I had permission to climb. He taught Scott and me the basics, like how to rappel.

How does Everest feel when he first tries to step backward off the cliff? Draw a box around the paragraph that tells what happens to him.

5

When that first moment came for me to step backward off the cliff’s edge, I couldn’t do it. I had the harness on, and my brain knew I wouldn’t fall, but my body refused to step down into nothing. Scott snickered.

6

“Wait till it’s your turn,” I told him.

7

His father gave me a pep talk, which I didn’t even hear. I thought of Everest, almost six miles high. I thought of the Yellow Band and the Hillary Step and all the other places I was never going to see if I didn’t just move my foot. So I stepped backward off the cliff and I didn’t fall.

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Part 4: Guided Practice

Hints Which sentence in paragraph 2 helps you answer this question?

Which sentence in paragraph 4 gives you the answer to this question?

Lesson 5

Use the Hints on this page to help you answer the questions. 1 Describe how Everest keeps his climbing a secret from his

mother. Use two details from the story in your answer.



























2 Who teaches Everest and Scott the basics of mountain climbing,

such as how to rappel? A Everest’s father B Scott’s father

C Everest’s father’s friends D Everest’s mother Look back at the paragraph you boxed to see the first thing Scott does when it is his turn.

3 Which sentence from the story tells what happens to Everest

when it’s time for him to take a step off the cliff?

A “My friend Scott’s father knew that my dad had been a bigtime mountaineer, so he believed me when I said I had permission to climb.” B “So I stepped backward off the cliff and I didn’t fall.” C “I had the harness on, and my brain knew I wouldn’t fall, but my body refused to step down into nothing.” D “His father gave me a pep talk, which I didn’t even hear.”

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Part 5: Common Core Practice

Lesson 5

Read the story. Then answer the questions that follow.

An Earful by Dale-Marie Bryan, Highlights   1 “Your homework is to collect sounds,” Mrs. Olson said. She handed out sheets of paper shaped like giant ears. Then she held up a shiny blue kazoo. “Everyone who gets an ‘earful’ will get one of these.” The class laughed.   2 Later, Jacob glared out the schoolbus window. Not fair, he thought. How could he collect enough sounds on his family’s farm? There were plenty of noises in town. If only he lived where tires squeal.   3 Jacob scrambled off the bus when it screeched to a stop at his mailbox. But he wasn’t in the mood to wave as it drove away.   4 When he threw open the gate, it groaned like a ghost. That was how he felt about his homework.   5 On the porch, Jacob knelt beside the kittens curled on the rug. They sounded like tiny motors when they purred.   6 “I’m home!” Jacob called. He thumped his book bag down on a kitchen chair.   7

The rocker in the nursery stopped creaking.

  8 “How was school?” his mother asked, walking in with his baby brother on her shoulder. She was patting his little back.   9

“I’ve got homework,” Jacob grumbled.

10

The baby burped, and Jacob laughed. “That’s what I think about it, too!”

11 “Have a snack before you do your chores,” his mother said. She took the animal crackers down from the cupboard. 12 Jacob rattled the carton. Not many left. He crunched two tigers, three lions, and a seal, then gulped down some milk. Grrr, roar, ork! If only animal crackers were real. He would have plenty of noises to list! 50

L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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Part 5: Common Core Practice

Lesson 5

13 Goldie, Jacob’s collie, woofed as Jacob walked toward the barn. Her puppies were yipping in a straw-filled stall. Jacob plinked dog-food pellets into their pan, and the pups snuffled and crunched. 14 In the chicken house, Jacob shooed two cackling hens from their nests. He slipped their warm eggs into his jacket. Wouldn’t it be funny if he forgot about the eggs and they hatched? He’d have a peeping pocket! 15 In the corral, a black cow napped in the sun. Jacob woke her when he poured corn into her pan. “Moo, thank you!” she seemed to say. 16 Tap, clatter, clink. Dad drove the tractor into the yard. The lid on the tractor’s smokestack rattled when it chuffed and chugged to a stop. 17

“How was school?” Dad asked, stepping down from the cab.

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Jacob shrugged. “OK, I guess,” he said. “I have some homework.”

19 Jacob put the eggs in the kitchen, then climbed to his tree house. He could see Dad’s beehives by the hay field. Six hives usually meant plenty of humming. But today he couldn’t hear it over the scolding of the blue jays and the chattering of the sparrows. How could a person think? 20

“QUIET!” Jacob shouted.

21 Suddenly, he sat up straight. Cows mooed and puppies yipped. Chickens cackled in their yard. When Goldie began barking below, Jacob grinned. There were plenty of noises on the farm. “I hear you!” he called. He hurried down from the tree. He had an earful of homework to do. Answer Form

1 What is Jacob’s mother doing when Jacob comes home from school?

A taking care of Jacob’s baby brother

1  A B C D 2  A B C D 4  A B C D

Number Correct

3

B fixing Jacob a snack in the kitchen C sitting on the porch with the kittens D feeding animals in the barn L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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Part 5: Common Core Practice

Lesson 5

2 Which sentence from the story tells why Jacob is upset about his homework assignment?

A “Everyone who gets an ‘earful’ will get one of these.” B “How could he collect enough sounds on his family’s farm?” C “There were plenty of noises in town.” D “Later, Jacob glared out the schoolbus window.”

3 Write a paragraph telling why Jacob wishes the animal crackers were real. Use two details from the story to support your answer.

4 Where is Jacob when he understands how many sounds there are to hear on the farm?

A near the beehives B in the chicken house C in the corral D in his tree house Self Check Go back and see what you can check off on the Self Check on page 43. 52

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Lesson 5

(Student Book pages 45–52)

Asking Questions About Stories Theme: Discoveries

LESSON OBJECTIVES

TAP STUDENTS’ PRIOR KNOWLEDGE

• Show understanding of stories by asking and answering questions.

• Tell students they will be working on a lesson about asking and answering questions about stories.

• Refer to the text to support answers to questions asked about the text.

THE LEARNING PROGRESSION

• Remind students that they have learned about asking and answering questions about informational texts in Lesson 1. In this lesson, they will apply the same reading strategy to fiction.

• Grade 2: CCSS RL.2.1 requires students to ask and answer questions such as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

• Explain that, in order to demonstrate their understanding of a story, students should be able to ask questions and then find the answers to those questions in the story.

• Grade 3: CCSS RL.3.1 builds on the Grade 2 standard by expanding the types of questions students must formulate and answer and by emphasizing that students need to closely read the text to demonstrate understanding. By asking questions and referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers, students learn to demonstrate comprehension of a text’s details and events.

• Display and read aloud a short passage from a familiar story students have recently read. Ask students questions that are answered directly in the text, such as “Who are the characters? What does each character say?” (Students’ responses should come directly from the text.) Ask students to explain how they knew the answer to each question. (Students should describe that they found the answer in the text.)

• Grade 4: CCSS RL.4.1 requires students to move beyond a literal understanding of the text and begin making inferences.

PREREQUISITE SKILLS • Understand how asking and answering questions about a story, such as who, what, where, when, why, and how, clarifies understanding of the story.

• Then ask volunteers to pose questions that can be answered in the text. (Where does the story take place?) Have other students answer the questions that their classmates pose. • Point out that when students ask and answer questions about a story, they are able to better understand it. Teacher Toolbox

• Use specific details and examples from a story to answer questions about the story.

Teacher-Toolbox.com

Prerequisite Skills

✓ ✓

Ready Lessons Tools for Instruction Interactive Tutorials

RL.3.1



CCSS Focus RL.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. ADDITIONAL STANDARDS:  RL.3.2; RL.3.4; RL.3.6; RL.3.7; W.3.1; W.3.3; W.3.7; W.3.8; SL.3.1; SL.3.3; SL.3.4; L.3.1.d; L.3.1.e; L.3.4.a; L.3.4.b; L.3.5.a (See page A39 for full text.)

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Lesson 53

Part 1: Introduction At a glance After reading the beginning of a story, students ask a question that can be answered by details in the text.

Lesson 5

Part 1: Introduction

ccSS

Asking Questions About Stories

RL.3.1: Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

Theme: Discoveries

step by step • Read the introduction about “right there” questions and “think-and-search” questions. Explain that good readers ask questions while they read stories. Point out that they often ask who, what, when, where, why, and how questions. Sometimes, the answers to those questions can be found in one place in a story. Sometimes, students will have to put together details from different parts of a story to answer the question. • Have students read the paragraph and follow the directions to think of a question that can be answered by details in the story. Then have them underline the details in the story that help them answer their question. • Explain to students that the chart contains two questions about the story: one right-there question and one think-and-search question. The chart also includes relevant story details and the answer to each question. This chart will help them organize the questions they have about a story and record the details that help answer those questions. • Read aloud each column and discuss the connection between the story details and the answer to the question. Point out that the answer to the second question requires the reader to add some of his or her own knowledge about what is usually inside a treasure chest.

It’s important to keep track of what’s going on in a story by asking questions as you read. The answers to some questions can be found in one sentence of the story. Think of them as “right-there” questions. To answer other questions, you may need to think about and search for details in different parts of the story. Think of these as “think-andsearch” questions. Let’s practice this. Read the following paragraph. Erika was doing her homework. Her pencil rolled off the desk and under the bed. She was under the bed looking for it when she saw an old wooden box she had never seen before. How did that get there? she asked herself. When Erika opened it, she saw gold coins glittering in the dim light. “Wow!” she said, “I think it’s a treasure chest.” write a question that could be answered by details in this paragraph. underline the parts of the paragraph where you can find your answer. Responses will vary.

Look at the chart to see how a “right-there” question and a “think-and-search” question can be answered by looking at story details. Story Details

Answer

Right-There Question: What does Erika find under the bed?

Question

“She was under the bed looking for it when she saw an old wooden box she had never seen before.”

Erika finds an old wooden box under her bed that she has never seen before.

Think-and-Search Question: Why does Erika think she has found a treasure chest?

“When Erika opened it, she saw gold coins glittering in the dim light.”

Erika thinks she has found a treasure chest because treasure chests in stories are often filled with gold coins.

Good readers ask questions about what’s happening in a story and whom it’s happening to. They also ask questions about where and why the events happen. L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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• Have volunteers share the question they wrote about the story. Work with students to record and answer students’ questions in a chart similar to the one on this page of the student book.

Genre Focus Literature: Realistic Fiction A realistic fiction story is a story with characters who take part in activities that could really happen. The characters, settings, and situations are believable and could really happen, but the story is made up. • Realistic fiction stories usually take place in the present. • The characters are like people you might really know in real life. • The situations described are familiar and might even have happened to you or to someone you know. They do not include, for example, adventures to other planets.

L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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Based on these characteristics, have students share examples of realistic fiction they have read. Who were the characters? What was the story’s setting? What happened to the characters? Realistic fiction with which students might be familiar includes Judy Moody by Megan McDonald, Ivy and Bean by Annie Barrows, and the many books about Ramona Quimby by Beverly Cleary. The three stories in this lesson are all examples of realistic fiction. The stories are made up, but they could all actually happen in real life.

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Lesson 5

Part 2: Modeled Instruction At a glance Students read a story about a girl and her grandmother and then use story details to answer a question.

Part 2: modeled Instruction

Lesson 5

Read the first part of a story about a girl and her grandmother. Genre: Realistic Fiction

Grandma’s Secret

step by step

by Kat Williams

Annie dreamed of being a famous singer. She and her grandmother both liked watching TV shows that made real people into singing stars.

• Remind students they just used details to ask and answer questions about a short story.

One night Grandma brought down a box from the attic. “I’d like to show you some old photographs,” she said. “I think you might find them interesting.” One photo showed four girls singing on a stage. Their hair was done up, and they

• Tell students that in this lesson they will read a short story and look for story details that help them answer a question.

wore matching dresses. “Who are those people?” Annie asked. “That’s me on the right,” Grandma said. Annie looked closely. “I see you! What are you doing?” “I’m singing on a TV show with my group, The Wildflowers,” Grandma said.

• Read aloud the story “Grandma’s Secret.” • Then read the question: “What is shown in the photograph that Annie looks at with Grandma?” • Now tell students you will perform a Think Aloud to demonstrate a way of answering the question. Think Aloud: The question asks about the photograph that Grandma shows Annie. I will reread the story and underline details about the photo. I read that one photo showed four girls singing on a stage. Grandma tells Annie that she is the person on the right. • Direct students to the chart and ask where they’ve seen a similar chart before. Remind them that the chart shows the process of using story details to answer a question. Point out the two story details. Think Aloud: In the last sentence, Grandma says, “I’m singing on a TV show with my group The Wildflowers.” This detail tells me more about the photo. • Have students record this detail in the chart. Think Aloud: Now I will use the details about the photo to answer the question. • Finally, ask students to suggest words to fill in the blanks in the Answer column to complete the chart.

(continued)

explore how to answer this question: “What is shown in the photograph that Annie looks at with Grandma?” What kind of question is this? It’s a “think-and-search” question. To find the answer, you need to look at several details in the story and put them together. Look for story details that help you identify what is in the photo. Two details are provided for you below. write one more detail on the lines. Then fill in the blanks in the Answer column. Story Details • “One photo showed four girls singing on a stage.” • “That’s me on the right,” Grandma said. •

“I’m singing on a Tv show with my group, The wildflowers,” grandma said.

Answer The photo shows Grandma

singing on Tv with her group, The wildflowers

.

The details that answer the question are in three different sentences. By putting these details together, you can answer the question about what the photo shows.

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ELL Support: Regular Past-Tense Verbs • Explain to students that verbs are action words. The past tense of a verb tells that the action has already happened. The past tense of a regular verb ends in -ed. • Work with students to identify and form the past tense of regular verbs. Point out the first sentence in paragraph 1. Work with students to identify the verb (dream) and the verb’s ending (-ed). Then write the verbs smile, try, and tap on the board. Work together to form the past tense of each verb and tell how it is formed. (smile: add d; try: change y to i and add -ed; tap: add -ped) • Point out the regular past tense verbs liked, showed, asked, and looked on page 46. (L.3.1.d; L.3.1.e)

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Lesson 5

Part 3: Guided Instruction At a glance Students continue reading the story. They answer a multiple-choice question, explain why the other possible answers to the question are incorrect, and ask other questions that can be answered by story details.

step by step • Tell students they will continue reading the story about Annie and her grandmother. • Close Reading will help students look for story details that tell how and why Grandma was singing on TV. The Hint will help students by rewording the question to match the words used in the story. • Have students read the passage and underline sentences that tell how Grandma came to be on TV, as directed by Close Reading. • Ask volunteers to share the sentences they underlined. Discuss how those words and phrases help show why Grandma was on TV. If necessary, ask, “What was Grandma doing in the picture? What did she do that was very popular? What happened as a result?” • Have students respond to the prompt in Show Your Thinking. Then have them do the Pair/Share activity..

answer analysis Choice A is incorrect. Grandma sang with The Wildflowers, but that is not why they were on TV. Choice B is correct. Grandma says, “We recorded a song, and . . . it was so popular that we were asked to sing it on TV.” Choice C is incorrect. The story details do not mention a TV show contest. Choice D is incorrect. Grandma’s song played on the radio. She didn’t hear about the TV show on the radio. ERROR ALERT: Students who did not choose B might have been confused or had trouble finding the appropriate story details. Remind students that the story includes a lot of details, but not all of them answer the question.

L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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Part 3: guided Instruction

Lesson 5

continue reading about Annie and her grandmother. use the close Reading and the hint to help you answer the question.

close Reading

(continued from page 46)

What does Grandma tell Annie about the song she sang on TV? underline sentences that tell how she came to sing on TV.

“It was 40 years ago,” Grandma said. “We recorded a song, and it played on the radio. It was so popular that we were asked to sing it on TV.” “Why didn’t you tell me this before?” asked Annie. Grandma smiled. “Oh, I guess I haven’t thought about it for a long time.” Now it was Annie’s turn to smile. “So, Grandma, what else have you done that you haven’t told me about?”

hint

circle the correct answer.

Why were The Wildflowers asked to sing on TV?

Why did Grandma sing a song on TV? A The Wildflowers asked her to sing with them. b

Her group had a popular song on the radio.

c

She won a contest on a TV show.

D She heard about the TV show on the radio.

Show your Thinking Pick one of the answers you did not choose. Tell why you think it does not answer the question correctly. Responses will vary.

Think of another question that can be answered by reading the story. Ask your partner the question. Then discuss which details from the story help answer the question.

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Tier Two Vocabulary: Popular • Say, “A new song that is played on the radio a lot is popular.” • Ask students why this is an example of something that is popular. (Many people like that thing.) Work with students to give other examples of things that are popular. (Examples include clothing styles and games.) • Direct students to the word popular in paragraph 1. Ask them what popular means in this context. (“liked by many people”) (RL.3.4; L.3.4.a)

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Lesson 5

Part 4: Guided Practice At a glance Students read a story twice about a boy learning to rock climb. After the first reading, you will ask three questions to check your students’ comprehension of the text.

step by step • Have students read the story silently without referring to the Study Buddy or Close Reading text. • Ask the following questions to ensure student comprehension of the text: Why is the boy named Everest? (His father named him after the mountain.) Why does Everest have to hide his climbing gear? (His mother doesn’t allow him to climb, so he keeps it a secret from her.) How does Everest find the courage to step off the cliff? (He thinks about all the places he’ll never see if he doesn’t take the first step.) • Ask students to reread the story and look at the Study Buddy think aloud. What does the Study Buddy help them think about?

Part 4: guided Practice

Lesson 5

Read the story. use the Study buddy and the close Reading to guide your reading. Genre: Realistic Fiction

from “A Boy Called Everest” by Jennifer R. Hubbard, Cricket 1 I’m going to write down my questions when I reread this story. For example, I wonder how Everest keeps from falling when he steps off the cliff.

step, and my mother knew it. My father’s friends could’ve taught me what I needed to know, but she wouldn’t allow it. 2

She didn’t know that I went anyway. I taught myself the basics on boulders and small rockfaces, learned about handholds and toeholds and balance. By the time I was fifteen, I was climbing regularly. I bought gear and hid

close Reading How does Everest learn to climb? underline two sentences that tell about learning the basics of climbing.

I was forbidden to climb rocks. Rock climbing was the first

it from her, keeping some of it at my friend Scott’s house. 3

My father named me Everest. People are always asking if I’m named after the mountain. “That’s right,” I tell them.

4

My friend Scott’s father knew that my dad had been a big-time mountaineer, so he believed me when I said I had permission to climb. He taught Scott and me the basics, like how to rappel.

How does Everest feel when he first tries to step backward off the cliff? Draw a box around the paragraph that tells what happens to him.

5

When that first moment came for me to step backward off the cliff’s edge, I couldn’t do it. I had the harness on, and my brain knew I wouldn’t fall, but my body refused to step down into nothing. Scott snickered.

6 7

“Wait till it’s your turn,” I told him. His father gave me a pep talk, which I didn’t even hear. I thought of Everest, almost six miles high. I thought of the Yellow Band and the Hillary Step and all the other places I was never going to see if I didn’t just move my foot. So I stepped backward off the cliff and I didn’t fall.

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Tip: The Study Buddy tells students ittowill circle write down questions unknown wordswhen and then rereading underline the story. clues that The Study help them understand Buddy models thethe strategies meaning of of rereading those words. and asking Using context clues questions to show to learn students new vocabulary how they can is ainteract powerful reading with theskill storystudents to betterwill understand use their its whole meaning. lives. • Have students follow the directions and answer the questions in the Close Reading.

Tip: Point out to students that marking the text where they found the answer to a question can help them recall this detail later on. • Finally, have students answer the questions on page 49. When students have finished, use the Answer Analysis to discuss correct and incorrect responses.

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Tier Two Vocabulary: Regularly • Tell students that something that is regular is normal or happens often. • Ask students to think of examples of things that are regular activities they do. (go to school, do homework, play soccer) • Now write the word regularly on the board. Discuss with students what the suffix -ly does. (changes a word from an adjective, or a word that tells what something is like, to an adverb, or a word that mostly tells how an action is performed) • Have students find the word regularly in paragraph 2. Ask them what the word regularly is describing. (how Everest was climbing) Work with them to determine that it means “often or frequently” in this context. (L.3.4.b)

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Lesson 5

Part 4: Guided Practice step by step Part 4: guided Practice

• Have students read questions 1–3, using the Hints to help them answer those questions.

use the hints on this page to help you answer the questions.

hints

Tip: Students will need to reread and look for

Lesson 5

Which sentence in paragraph 2 helps you answer this question?

1 Describe how Everest keeps his climbing a secret from his

Which sentence in paragraph 4 gives you the answer to this question?

2 Who teaches Everest and Scott the basics of mountain climbing,

details to answer these questions. If students are having trouble, remind them that the story might use different words or phrases than the ones used in the answer choices.

mother. Use two details from the story in your answer. See sample response.

• Discuss with students the Answer Analysis below.

Answer Analysis 1 Sample response: Everest keeps climbing a secret from his mother by teaching himself some basic climbing skills and learning from his friend’s dad. Everest also secretly keeps some of his equipment at his friend Scott’s house.

Look back at the paragraph you boxed to see the first thing Scott does when it is his turn.

Question

Story Details

Answer

How does Everest keep his climbing a secret from his mother?

“I bought gear and hid it from her, keeping some of it at my friend Scott’s house.”

Everest hides his climbing gear. He keeps some of it at his friend’s house.

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b

Scott’s father

c

Everest’s father’s friends

3 Which sentence from the story tells what happens to Everest

when it’s time for him to take a step off the cliff? A “My friend Scott’s father knew that my dad had been a bigtime mountaineer, so he believed me when I said I had permission to climb.” b

“So I stepped backward off the cliff and I didn’t fall.”

c

“I had the harness on, and my brain knew I wouldn’t fall, but my body refused to step down into nothing.”

D “His father gave me a pep talk, which I didn’t even hear.”

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Integrating Standards Use these questions to further students’ understanding of the excerpt from “A Boy Called Everest.” 1 What is the central message of this story? What details support this message? (RL.3.2)

reteaching Use a graphic organizer to verify the correct answer to question 1. Draw the chart below, leaving the boxes blank. Have students fill in the boxes, using details from the story. Sample responses are provided.

A Everest’s father

D Everest’s mother

2 The correct choice is B. The text says Scott’s father “taught Scott and me the basics, like how to rappel.” Choice A is about Everest’s father, who is not there when Everest learns to rock climb. The story says that Everest’s mother wouldn’t allow his father’s friends to teach him, so choice C is incorrect. Choice D is incorrect because Everest’s mother does not approve of him learning to mountain climb. 3 The correct choice is C. At the moment he is to step off, Scott freezes. Choice A is incorrect because it describes an event from earlier in the story. Choice B is incorrect because it comes later, after Scott has thought through his fear. Choice D also comes after the first moment when Scott is meant to take his turn, so it is incorrect.

such as how to rappel?

The message of this story is to chase your dreams and not give up. Everest had to overcome several barriers to climbing, including his mother’s disapproval and his own fear. In the end, he thought about all the things he wanted to see and do but wouldn’t be able to if he didn’t make the effort and try.

2 What is the meaning of the word basics, as it is used in this story? (RL.3.4)

Everest taught himself the basics of rock climbing, and Scott’s dad taught him the basics of mountain climbing. The word basics means the simplest and most essential information you need to know to begin. Without knowing the basics, you can’t do anything and you can’t learn more advanced techniques.

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Lesson 5

Part 5: Common Core Practice

Part 5: common core Practice

Part 5: common core Practice

Lesson 5

Read the story. Then answer the questions that follow.

Lesson 5

13 Goldie, Jacob’s collie, woofed as Jacob walked toward the barn. Her puppies were yipping in a straw-filled stall. Jacob plinked dog-food pellets into their pan, and the pups snuffled and crunched.

An Earful by Dale-Marie Bryan, Highlights 1 “Your homework is to collect sounds,” Mrs. Olson said. She handed out sheets of paper shaped like giant ears. Then she held up a shiny blue kazoo. “Everyone who gets an ‘earful’ will get one of these.” The class laughed.

14 In the chicken house, Jacob shooed two cackling hens from their nests. He slipped their warm eggs into his jacket. Wouldn’t it be funny if he forgot about the eggs and they hatched? He’d have a peeping pocket! 15 In the corral, a black cow napped in the sun. Jacob woke her when he poured corn into her pan. “Moo, thank you!” she seemed to say.

2 Later, Jacob glared out the schoolbus window. Not fair, he thought. How could he collect enough sounds on his family’s farm? There were plenty of noises in town. If only he lived where tires squeal.

16 Tap, clatter, clink. Dad drove the tractor into the yard. The lid on the tractor’s smokestack rattled when it chuffed and chugged to a stop. 17

“How was school?” Dad asked, stepping down from the cab.

3 Jacob scrambled off the bus when it screeched to a stop at his mailbox. But he wasn’t in the mood to wave as it drove away.

18

Jacob shrugged. “OK, I guess,” he said. “I have some homework.”

4 When he threw open the gate, it groaned like a ghost. That was how he felt about his homework. 5 On the porch, Jacob knelt beside the kittens curled on the rug. They sounded like tiny motors when they purred.

20

“QUIET!” Jacob shouted.

21 Suddenly, he sat up straight. Cows mooed and puppies yipped. Chickens cackled in their yard. When Goldie began barking below, Jacob grinned. There were plenty of noises on the farm. “I hear you!” he called. He hurried down from the tree. He had an earful of homework to do.

6 “I’m home!” Jacob called. He thumped his book bag down on a kitchen chair. 7

19 Jacob put the eggs in the kitchen, then climbed to his tree house. He could see Dad’s beehives by the hay field. Six hives usually meant plenty of humming. But today he couldn’t hear it over the scolding of the blue jays and the chattering of the sparrows. How could a person think?

The rocker in the nursery stopped creaking.

8 “How was school?” his mother asked, walking in with his baby brother on her shoulder. She was patting his little back. 9 10

“I’ve got homework,” Jacob grumbled.

Answer Form

1

The baby burped, and Jacob laughed. “That’s what I think about it, too!”

What is Jacob’s mother doing when Jacob comes home from school?

11 “Have a snack before you do your chores,” his mother said. She took the animal crackers down from the cupboard.

A taking care of Jacob’s baby brother

12 Jacob rattled the carton. Not many left. He crunched two tigers, three lions, and a seal, then gulped down some milk. Grrr, roar, ork! If only animal crackers were real. He would have plenty of noises to list!

C sitting on the porch with the kittens

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L5: Asking Questions About Stories

B

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Number correct

3

fixing Jacob a snack in the kitchen

D feeding animals in the barn L5: Asking Questions About Stories

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1 A B C D 2 A B C D 4 A B C D

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at a glance

answer analysis

Students independently read a longer story and answer questions in a format that provides test practice.

1 Choice A is correct. When Jacob comes home from school, he hears the rocking chair in the nursery stop creaking, and then he sees his mother holding his baby brother. After Jacob gets home, his mother gives him some animal crackers, so choice B is incorrect. Jacob, not his mother, kneels with the kittens on the porch when he gets home, so choice C is also incorrect. Finally, choice D is incorrect because Jacob feeds the different animals in the barn after he has a snack. (DOK 1)

step by step • Tell students to use what they have learned about using story details to answer questions and read the passage on pages 50 and 51. • Remind students to ask questions as they read and underline details that answer those questions. • Tell students to answer the questions on pages 51 and 52. For questions 1, 2, and 4, they should fill in the correct circle on the Answer Form. • When students have finished, use the Answer Analysis to discuss correct responses and the reasons for them. Have students fill in the correct number on the Answer Form.

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Theme Connection • How do all the stories in this lesson relate to the theme of discoveries? • What is one thing you learned in this lesson about making discoveries?

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Lesson 5

Part 5: Common Core Practice 2 Choice B is correct. Jacob believes there are fewer sounds on the farm than in town, “where tires squeal.” Choice A is incorrect because it shows a reward for doing well, not an obstacle. Choice C leaves out Jacob’s main objection, the lack of noises on the farm. Choice D shows that Jacob is upset, but it does not say why. (DOK 2)

Part 5: common core Practice 2

Lesson 5

Which sentence from the story tells why Jacob is upset about his homework assignment?

A “Everyone who gets an ‘earful’ will get one of these.” B

“How could he collect enough sounds on his family’s farm?”

C “There were plenty of noises in town.” D “Later, Jacob glared out the schoolbus window.”

3 Sample response: Jacob wishes the animal crackers were real animals. If they were real, they would make a lot of noise, and he would have plenty of noises to list for his homework. (DOK 3)

3

Write a paragraph telling why Jacob wishes the animal crackers were real. Use two details from the story to support your answer. See sample response.

4 Choice D is correct. Jacob finally understands how many sounds there are around him when he is in his tree house and he calls, “I hear you!” Choice A is misleading since he can see the beehives from his tree house but is not near them. Jacob is in both the chicken house and corral earlier in the story, before he understands how many sounds are on the farm. (DOK 1)

4

Where is Jacob when he understands how many sounds there are to hear on the farm?

A near the beehives B

in the chicken house

C in the corral D in his tree house Self check Go back and see what you can check off on the Self Check on page 43. 52

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Integrating Standards Use these questions and tasks as opportunities to interact with “An Earful.”

3 Why does the author say the gate “groaned like a ghost”? What does this mean? (L.3.5.a)

1 What is important about the blue jay that is pictured on page 51? Why is this animal pictured instead of other animals from the story? (RL.3.7)





At the end of the story, the sound of the blue jays were so loud that Jacob could not hear the beehives. It was because of this noise that Jacob finally heard all of the sounds around him and was able to do his homework.

2 Were you able to notice or “hear” the many sounds around Jacob? Was your point of view on sounds on the farm different from Jacob’s point of view in most of the story? (RL.3.6)

Responses will vary. In most of the story, Jacob doesn’t think there are any good sounds on his farm, but I didn’t think that. I noticed the sounds of the gate, his baby brother, and all the animals.

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This means that when Jacob opened the gate, it made a sound that sounded like a ghost groaning. It does not mean that the gate was literally a ghost. It was comparing two sounds. It describes the sound of the gate and helps the reader “hear” the sound better.

4 Suppose you were given the same homework assignment. Write a narrative about all the different sounds you hear during the day. (W.3.3)

Narratives will vary.

5 Discuss in small groups: How many sounds does the author describe? How are the sounds described? (SL.3.1)

Discussions will vary. Remind students to follow the agreed-upon rules for discussion and listen carefully when they are not speaking. Encourage students to discuss how the author’s word choices help readers “hear” the noises around Jacob.

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Lesson 5

Additional Activities

Writing Activities Opinion Piece (W.3.1) • Have students reread “A Boy Called Everest.” Ask, “Do you think it was a good idea for Everest to keep his climbing a secret?” • Ask students to write an opinion piece about whether they think it was a good idea or not. Encourage them to consider what might have happened if his mother found out or if he hurt himself while climbing. • Remind students to state their opinions clearly, provide reasons to support their opinions, and provide a concluding statement. Figurative Language (RL.3.4; L.3.5.a) • Direct students to examples of figurative language in “An Earful,” such as “they sounded like tiny motors” and “a peeping pocket.” • Guide students to determine both the literal and nonliteral meanings of these phrases. Then ask students to explain why the author chose to use these phrases. • Encourage students to write sentences that describe sounds using figurative language.

Listening activity (SL.3.3)

media activity (SL.3.3; SL.3.4)

Listen Closely/Ask and Answer Questions

Be Creative/Dramatize a Photograph

• Have small groups of students reread paragraphs from “An Earful.”

• Review “Grandma’s Secret.” Have students choose and bring in a photograph of several people.

• Group members must listen closely and then ask questions about what they heard. Students should be able to answer the questions using details from the story.

• Students should think of a story that describes who these people are, what they are doing, and why they are there. Encourage students to include sounds and smells in their descriptions.

discussion activity (SL.3.1)

• Have students tell or act out their story of their photograph for the class. Then have them answer questions other students might have about the story.

Talk in a Group/Describe a Photo • Ask students to think about the photo that Annie’s grandmother describes in “Grandma’s Secret.” • Have each student choose a photograph from a magazine or newspaper and keep it secret. Then have students form small groups. Encourage students to describe their photos without showing them to the rest of the group. Other students should ask questions, stay on topic, and listen carefully to one another. • Appoint one member of each group to take notes. Allow 10–15 minutes for discussion. Then have each group share its results with the class.

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research activity (W.3.7; W.3.8; SL.3.4) Research and Present/Research a Topic • Ask students to choose a topic from “A Boy Called Everest” to research, such as rock climbing, mountaineering, or Mount Everest. • Have students research their chosen topic and take notes. Students should write a brief report. • Students should produce a visual display, such as an illustration or diagram, to accompany their reports. Have students present their reports to the class.

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