Appendix: Sample Programs

Appe ndix: Sampl e Pr ogram s Integrated unit for stage one Excerpt from an integrated unit for stage 1 (kindergarten–year 1) English/Literacy/Arts/ ...
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Appe ndix: Sampl e Pr ogram s

Integrated unit for stage one Excerpt from an integrated unit for stage 1 (kindergarten–year 1) English/Literacy/Arts/ Personal Development, written by Robyn Ewing.

Background A kindergarten/year 1 composite class working on fairy tales used Lauren Child’s (2003) Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Book as the text for close study over four weeks. At the same time they used a range of other fairy tales (both traditional and alternative) in literature circles. They used a range of visual arts and drama strategies to develop their understandings of narrative text and to encourage their own oral and written storying. Initially, the students’ story writing was benchmarked using criteria for narrative writing. The students’ writing was reassessed at the conclusion of the unit. Suitability: years K–2. Duration: 8–10 sessions approximately 25–40 minutes each. Resources: Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Book (Child); The Paper Bag Princess (Munsch); The Princess and the Perfect Dish (Gleeson & Greder); nursery rhymes; and a selection of other fairy tales including versions of The Frog Prince; The Three Bears; Cinderella.

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Anticipated outcomes It is expected that students will • explore a range of well known and non-traditional fairy tales; • become familiar with the structure of fairy tales; • retell fairy tales and nursery rhymes; • use their bodies and facial expressions to represent different fairy tale characters and different moods, thoughts and feelings; • recognise that words on a page have meaning and can be read aloud in different ways to suggest different feelings; • share their own fairytales with confidence orally and in writing; • understand the different phases of a fairytale: orientation, complication, resolution; and • work cooperatively in small groups.

Program Focus: Our feelings, moods and actions have an impact on those around us. Narratives are an important way for us to communicate with each other about the things that are important in our lives. Session 1: As a whole group the class revisit the stories of Goldilocks and the Three Bears and Cinderella. They take it in turns around the circle to add the next sentence to build up the stories. It is important to demonstrate that there are different versions and endings of the same stories. Session 2: Students choose their favourite character from either fairy tale and walk in role exploring this character. How do they walk? How do they walk when they are happy? Worried? Afraid? Students in small groups take turns to look at each other and guess who is being depicted. Students conclude the session by drawing large pictures of their character (can be child-sized if older buddies can trace around the

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children). They think about adjectives that describe their character. The characters are displayed around the room. Session 3: Shared reading of Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Book? Discussion of the text, setting, the characters, etc. Session 4: Students choose one of the characters in the story. In pairs, students sculpt or paint each other as their chosen character at a critical moment in the story. The teacher ‘taps in’ to the artworks and students respond with a brief comment about how they are feeling at the depicted moment. Students add a thought or speech bubble expressing their feelings at that particular point in the story. They list characteristics of their character around their artwork. Session 5: In small groups students choose a critical moment in either Goldilocks or Cinderella to present as a freeze frame. The class view all the critical moments and try to identify them. The teacher once again ‘taps in’ to find out how the characters were feeling. The still images are recorded with a digital camera and the students later add captions. Session 6: Students read a range of fairy tales in small guided reading groups and discuss the similarities of the structure of these stories. Back in a whole class group the teacher collates their observations about narrative structure. She shares an alter­ native fairy tale (e.g. The Paper Bag Princess) so children can discuss the differences. Session 7: Students think about how princesses, princes, dragons, fairy godmothers, wolves, witches and other main ‘good’ and ‘bad’ characters are often depicted in fairy stories. They write sentences or draw pictures to demonstrate how they are usually portrayed. (E.g. ‘Witches usually …’ ) Sessions 8–9: In pairs students plan then write their own fairy tales. This includes planning of characters, setting and sequence of story using frameworks provided by the teacher. Those who need teacher help to scribe the stories complete their illustrations first. The stories are edited if necessary. The students’ older buddies or parents word process the stories and then these are published and final illustrations completed. Session 10: Students share their fairy tales with other classes before they are placed in the library.

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Integrated unit for stage two An excerpt from an integrated unit of work for stage two (years three and four) written by Janelle Warhurst.

English, Creative Arts, Science, HSIE (see New South Wales DET Connected Outcomes Unit The Effects of Growth and Change) Related texts: The Great Bear (Gleeson & Greder); Arabella (Orr & Gamble); Storm Boy (Thiele) and Swan Song (Thiele). Anticipated outcomes will vary according to rele­vant state syllabus documents but the unit spans English (Talking and Listening, Reading and Writing) and Creative Arts (both Visual Arts and Drama).

Figure A.1 Blueback by Tim Winton

Literature Circles

Teaching and learning activities

Different roles are assigned to children when they are

1 Read the text each day using Literature Circle strategies (with parent helpers if available). 2 Discuss important events in each reading. 3 Ask students to take notes about the story. 4 Explicitly teach grammar, using Winton’s exemplary language as a model for different kinds of verbs and imagery, with exercises like this: Find a description in Chapter One of Blueback which may have imagery in it and which helps you to build up an image in your mind about the setting of the book. You may have found other quotes which help you to imagine

sharing a text in a small group. This helps students take responsibility for reflecting on different aspects of a response to a text. These roles include: • leading the discussion; • choosing a personally meaningful image to share; • identifying interesting or challenging words; • making connections with the student’s own world; and • developing a character profile.

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both characters moving in the setting or events which are unfolding. Note down any quotes you find and explain why they help you build up images.

5 Create a page of favourite images in an Interactive Whiteboard (IWB) notebook using text from the book. 6 Draw your favourite and most memorable images. These images will then be transferred to a mural using calico squares, tie-dying, batik, sewing and appliqué. Many different textures of material are added. Students collect other materials including beads, leather and foil. (Parents who are artists can assist with this.) 7 Write a letter from Dora to Abel while Abel is at boarding school. Explain to Abel that the developers have moved into Longboat Bay and describe what they are doing. 8 Using the model from Into the Story (Saxton and Miller, 2004, p. 32) group students and

Figure A.2 Memorable image

brainstorm theme-related words and ideas. Themes of Blueback include family, conservation, education, beauty and love. Create tableaux about the themes; other class members can ‘tap in’ to discover the meaning of each tableau. 9 Discuss the following questions in groups and write your own extended answers: a What do you think is the main message in the book? What parts of the story help to get this message across to the reader? (Read the section of the book which talks about how Dora says that the sea is sick. Why does she say this?) b Write as much as you know about a blue groper. Why did it have such a central role in Blueback?

Figure A.3 Main message

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c What is conflict? Look it up in the dictionary. d What are the main conflicts or problems between characters in the book? e Why must a narrative or story have conflict between characters? f

Why does Abel say that there is nothing in nature as cruel as a greedy human being?

10 Write and practise a drama about a significant event in Abel’s life, and have it ready for the class. 11 Research in collaborative groups as follows the marine ecosystem of the Ningaloo reef around which Blueback is written.

Computer assignment You may do this homework with a group but each person must take responsibility for a section so that one person is not doing it all. Start today! Remember last Thursday when some of you started to make notebooks of marine life for your mural panels? Why did you do this? What was it helping you to do? Was it helping you to create deep knowledge about what you were doing? Why do you need this? Also think about the marine life you have read about in Blueback or through your research earlier this term for your speech. If, for example, you have been interested in the life of a seahorse you may wish to study it for this homework. Your marine life may be represented in our mural so please be specific about the textures of the covering of the animal and threats to its survival which may help you with your mural panel designs. 1 Research in detail one endangered marine animal or plant that is found in the Ningaloo Reef in Western Australia. (Use internet or newspaper article as resources.) 2 Write a description of what it looks like, feels like, how it behaves and what its predators are. Describe its habitat, how it reproduces and why it is endangered. 3 Draw its life cycle.

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4 Create a picture that shows how the marine animal or plant exists in its ecosystem. Draw arrows to its prey and predators, and include illustrations of where it is living. 5 How would the disappearance of this marine animal affect our lives or that of other marine animals or plants? 6 Present your findings for all of the above questions in one of the following ways: a digital photographs and explanations in a notebook or Powerpoint; b your own drawings and hand written information; or c a short video with you talking. 7 We’ll do our planning on Tuesday. Write each group member’s name next to the section they will be responsible for. Step One: Decide which marine animal or plant you will research: for example, coral. (Tuesday in class) Step Two: Decide who will be responsible for finding the information for each question. (Tuesday in class) Step Three: Decide on a time when you could possibly meet together outside school time so that you can ask your parents. (Tuesday in class) Step Four: Research the question you are responsible for at home for homework. (Tuesday night and Wednesday night) Step Five: Record your results in a table, as shown below. Table A.1 Marine animal or plant project Marine animal:__________________________________________________________________ What don’t we know?

Who will do each question?

When will you do each question?

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8 Using the lesson Creatures of the Sea from Exploring the Worlds of K-6 Drama from Ancient Anna to the Cloth of Dreams (NSWDET 1998) develop and present a performance about an underwater environment and make links with Human Society and its Environment (HSIE). 9 Write your own marine animal narrative using rich imagery and verbs, remembering to start with your own unique setting such as a rock pool. Remember your marine drama and factors that have threatened your marine animal and its environment. 10 Listen to the Andrew Denton interview with Tim Winton. Write some questions and answers of your own for an interview with Tim Winton and practise these in pairs. Perform for the class. 11 Write letters to Tim Winton about your reaction to his book Blueback. T e ach er e valuati o n

The most powerful activity in terms of student engagement with the book and an indication of their love of drama was when students improvised their own marine animals which they had extensively researched and told stories about them through drama and movement. The students kept asking if they could do these over and over again and we set them to the music of ‘Deep Sea Dreaming’ by Elena Katz-Chernin. Students then wrote narratives which included descriptions of where the sea creatures were located, such as in a cave or on a rock shelf. At about the same time the year three students were participating in the NAPLaN Testing. Instead of giving them an unrelated narrative to write in preparation as is often done, the students had enacted their stories and these were published in a folder for the whole class to read. Our class Blueback mural grew out of student fascination with images and themes in the story. Drawings by groups of students reflected their interpretations of the story and these were translated into a paneled mural using batik, tie-dye and appliqué techniques. The text stimulus, mural stories and responses to various aspects of the activity were recorded. S t u d en ts’ r e s po n s es to th e making o f B lu eback mu r al

Talk about your answers to the following questions in small groups and write your responses below.

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A Which of the techniques used, such as batik, tie-dying or appliqué did you find most effective and why or did you use a combination of all techniques and how did this help you?

B Write about the textures, materials and objects you have used to create your mural panel.

C Why did you use each particular fabric? What other materials did you use and why?

D Did you sew or glue your pieces on to tell your story? How did this change your panel?

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E How did you find the making of the mural helped you to interpret (understand) Blueback?

F Which mural panel other than your own did you find meaningful and why?

Figure A.4 Main message

Figure A.5 Main message

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Unit for stage three English Mahtab’s Story by Libby Gleeson: a unit of work for stage three, written by Jenny Pickering, Curl Curl North Public School.

Aim: To achieve outcomes in reading,

writing,

talking

and

listening by engaging with the text Mahtab’s Story through drama and visual arts. Specific outcomes will vary Figure A.6 Mahtab’s Story by Libby Gleeson

according to relevant state sylla­ bus documents.

Table A.2 Outcomes—NSW English Syllabus TS3.1 Communicates effectively for a range of purposes and with a variety of audiences to express well-developed, well-organised ideas dealing with more challenging topics. TS3.2 Interacts productively and with autonomy in pairs and groups of various sizes and composition, uses effective oral presentation skills and strategies and listens attentively.

RS3.5 Reads independently an extensive range of texts with increasing content demands and responds to themes and issues. RS3.6 Uses a comprehensive range of skills and strategies appropriate to the type of text being read. RS3.7 Critically analyses techniques used by writers to create certain effects, to use language creatively, to position the reader in various ways and to construct different interpretations of experience. RS3.8 Identifies the text structure of a wider range of more complex text types and discusses how the characteristic grammatical features work to influence readers’ and viewers’ understanding of texts.

WS3.9 Produces a wide range of well-structured and well-presented literary and factual texts for a wide variety of purposes and audiences using increasingly challenging topics, ideas, issues and written language features. WS3.10 Uses knowledge of sentence structure, grammar and punctuation to edit own writing. WS3.11 Spells most common words accurately and uses a range of strategies to spell unfamiliar words.

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WS3.12 Produces texts in a fluent and legible style and uses computer technology to present these effectively in a variety of ways. WS3.13 Critically analyses own texts in terms of how well they have been written, how effectively they present the subject matter and how they influence the reader. WS3.14 Critically evaluates how own texts have been structured to achieve their purpose and discusses ways of using related grammatical features and con­ven­tions of written language to shape readers’ and viewers’ understanding of texts.

Links: The themes of identity, survival, war, family, tolerance, collaboration, resistance and turning a blind eye have been central to the previous texts studied. They were Hana’s Suitcase by Karen Levine and Rose Blanche by Roberto Innocenti. Both were set in the Second World War while Mahtab’s Story is set in Afghanistan between 1996 and 2001 as the Taliban ruled the country. Notes: This unit of work has been supported by teacher’s notes by Dr Susan La Marca.

Questions 1 Entering the story What does the word ‘freedom’ mean to you? Discuss. (Students could also be asked to form a tableau or frozen moment in groups of 3, 4 or 5 to illustrate their understanding of ‘freedom’.) Write a response. This response will be examined at the end of the story. Background information: Find pictures and videos of Afghanistan and kite fighting. Show maps of the area on Google Earth and Google Maps. Newspaper articles about refugees can also be researched. 2 Chapter 1 Predicting: After the first paragraph ask the students to predict what is happening. Where is Mahtab going? Why? Point out: Short sentences = sense of urgency and tension. Symbolism of the kite: Just note when a kite is mentioned. Fog = changes in her life

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3 Chapter 2 Show world map to locate Afghanistan and Pakistan. Connecting the story to the students’ own lives: Read to ‘get dressed quickly’ at the top of page 14. Ask students what they would bring if they had to leave suddenly in the middle of the night and go to another country. They can only take two precious items. (Students can actually bring these items from home and show the class and explain why.) Record what they have and why. 4 Chapter 3 Sculpting in pairs: Mahtab at home before the war began and then in the truck. Compare/contrast: Note the significance of the song, stories, sugar cubes and counting backwards—all are to distract from the terror of what is happening but also connect to their past life. Hot seat: After reading page 34, one student is chosen to be in role as Grandma. The rest of the class question her. 5 Chapter 4 Read to the end of page 43. Hot seat: Mahtab, her mother and her father. Writing in role: You are Mahtab. You have at last escaped safely from Afghanistan. At last you have a chance to write to Grandma and tell what has happened and about your thoughts feelings and experiences. Write your letter. At the end of the chapter: Teacher in role as Mahtab’s mother and students ask questions about their situation but the teacher also takes this opportunity to explain some of the background about the war and the Taliban as well as what might happen. 6 Chapter 5 Conscience Alley: Read to ‘… away from any visitor who comes’ on page 60. What should they do now? Why? How? Mother walks along the alley as students tell her what they should do and why. Once mother reaches the end of the alley she will tell the class what she has decided to do and why. Complete the chapter to find out what they decided to do. Writing in Role: You are Mahtab’s mother. Write to your husband. You do not know where he is but he has been gone for eight long months. You have made a

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decision about what to do and you want to tell him what it’s been like, why you have made your decision and how you intend to follow it up. 7 Chapter 6 Connecting with the story: After reading the chapter, write about a memory you never want to forget, one that you would close your eyes and think about if something very bad or scary was happening to you. 8 Chapters 7–8 Writing in role as Mahtab: After reading the chapters, write a letter to your father telling him about the journey. Tapping in: Underline the sentence that best sums up the journey. Try to memorise it. The class all close their eyes and listen to each sentence as the teacher taps students in turn. 9 Chapters 9–13 Background knowledge: Find pictures and locations of detention camps such as Port Hedland. At this stage it is probably better to read the story uninterrupted but hot seating and writing in role would again add to the students’ understanding. 10 Chapter 14 to the end of the story Compare and contrast the symbolism of the kites at the beginning of the story with the final scenes through discussion. Art: Make kites from paper and satay sticks. On one side draw/paint/collage symbols to show what kite-flying symbolised at the beginning of the story (freedom, used for fighting, banned by the Taliban, had to be buried as they represented the old ways, represent captivity, war, fear etc.) with the last part of the story (freedom).

Other activities that can be done at the end of the book 1 Interviews and Circle within a circle Interview: Students are in pairs. Student A is the interviewer while student B is Mahtab. Students use their knowledge of the story and other background information to interview Mahtab about her family’s journey. Give students ideas

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for questioning: Why did you … ? What happened when … ? How did you feel when … ? What if … ? Explain … Describe … Students swap roles. Circle within a circle: The teacher is in role as the producer of a current affairs program (e.g. Sixty Minutes) and has set up a meeting with the production team and journalists to discuss what they are going to do for a story about Mahtab’s family’s journey from Afghanistan to Australia. Students remain in their pairs. All student As form an inner circle with the teacher/producer while all student Bs sit in a circle around the outside. The students in the outer circle simply listen in while the students in the inner circle discuss everything they have learnt about Mahtab’s journey. The teacher should ask questions and guide the discussion so that students bring out the important themes, issues and ideas in the story. The students then swap places and the activity is repeated. 2 Readers’ theatre Demonstrate by taking an important moment in the story and turning it into a script for a short play using the descriptions, actions and direct speech already in the text as well as using your own words and actions to add meaning. (See attached script from pages 3 and 4.) In groups, students rehearse then perform the readers’ theatre for the class. Emphasise use of voice and facial expression with some actions. Teacher chooses sections or crucial events in the story. Divide the class into groups and have them write the script and then perform their piece. Alternatively, students may themselves choose the events they consider crucial to use for readers theatre. 3

Written review Give students headings to help plan their written review. Brainstorm content. Headings might include: What is the story about? (Journey, escape, survival, hope.) Why is the story told? (Inspiration of Nahid.) Who’s in it? (Characters.) Connections to other stories? (The effect of war on children, families and society.) Issues in Australia?

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How is the story told? (Language—short sentences to build tension and long sentences to describe dreams.) Symbolism? (Kites, shell, dirt, bracelet, tarpaulin.) Contrasts? (Freedom versus imprisonment/captivity.) Distractions in bad times? (Counting, song, sugar cubes’ stories.) Irony? (Australia promises freedom but characters are again imprisoned in the detention centre.)

Reader’s Theatre script for pages 3 and 4 of Mahtab’s Story C ast: U n cl e Wa h i d, Fa h ad, Rez a, Mah tab, Leila , Nar r ato r

Fahad and Reza are running around with their kites. Mahtab and Leila are sitting watching. FAHAD: Watch out Reza, I’m going to get you. I’m going to cut the string and bring your kite down! REZA: No way Fahad. I can run faster and move my kite to get yours and it will fly off into the sky, across the city and it will be lost for ever. Uncle Wahid races across, grabs the strings, hauling them to his chest swiftly. His hands are torn on the glass on the string. UNCLE WAHID: (Screaming.) You must never, never, never play this way again. You are putting the whole family in danger. You will be killed and your fathers and your mothers and your brothers and your sisters and your cousins. What do you think you are doing? You have been told everything has been changed and you are to never, never, never to play like this again. NARRATOR: Everything had changed. Mahtab and Leila look on fearfully holding hands. The boys are crying, snivelling and shrunken. They take a shovel and dig a hole. They fold up the kites and bury them. Uncle Wahid looks sternly on. They kick dirt over the kites.

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They then walk with Uncle Wahid who now puts his arms around their shoulders, pats them and and guides them back into the house. The boys sniff and sob. FAHAD: I love that kite. That is the only fun we have now. Why must I destroy it? REZA: There’s no fun anymore. Now my kite has gone what is there to look forward to? Winter is the best time because it’s kite fighting time. Fahad and I are the best. Now we can’t even do it at home let alone with all the other boys. (Sob.) UNCLE WAHID: I’m sorry I was so angry but I was so afraid when I saw what you were doing. You know the Taliban have banned kite fighting. It will bring our home to their attention. They will want to punish all of us if the rules are broken. They lie on their beds sobbing. Leila and Mahtab look on sadly then comfort the boys. Uncle Wahid walks slowly and sadly from the room.

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Unit for stage four Visual Arts Extract from a unit of work for stage four Visual Arts, written by Alexandra Cutcher, Banora Point High School

Specific outcomes will vary according to relevant state syllabus documents. Table A.3 Stage four Visual Arts Outcomes

Specific content focus for stage four

A student: 4.1 uses a range of strategies to explore different art-making conventions and procedures to make artworks;

Students learn about:

Students learn to:

•• the field of visual arts and design as comprising conventions; •• activities, traditions and customs shaped by different values and beliefs;

•• investigate the field of visual arts and design and approximate some conventions, activities, traditions and customs of the field to make art;

•• the pleasure and enjoyment in making artworks;

•• reflect on and interpret actions and choices, and document these in their diaries;

•• the function of the artist to make artworks—images or objects;

•• make images and objects (artworks) that approximate an approach to artistic practice;

•• the material, physical and virtual form of artworks intentionally made by artists;

•• make artworks using a range of 2D, including drawing, 3D and/or 4D forms, materials and techniques and various investigations of the world;

•• belief, value and meaning in artmaking in the structural frame;

•• investigate and employ a range of conventions including codes, symbols and signs and consider how communication is embedded in the material and conceptual organisation of artworks and offer a way to develop representations of ideas and interests in the world in the making of art;

•• belief, value and meaning in artmaking through the cultural frame;

•• investigate how notions of cultural identity form artistic practice, and consider the effects of science and technology, politics, economics and social issues upon artmaking;

•• feeling, emphasis, imagination and experience in art-making in the subjective frame;

•• investigate how the unconscious, intuition and imagination can be explored as a source of ideas for art-making and consider how artworks can be regarded as expressive and unique objects;

•• challenging assumptions about art and power through the postmodern frame; and

•• Investigate how artworks can be modified, reinterpreted and/or appropriated from a variety of sources using parody, irony and ideas that challenge the mainstream and conventions of art; and

•• how artworks may be differently interpreted by artists, writers, critics, historians and other audiences.

•• identify and describe the purpose, audience and context for viewing artworks.

4.2 explores the function of and relationships between the artist—artwork— world—audience; 4.3 makes artworks that involve some understanding of the frames; 4.4 recognises and uses aspects of the world as a source of ideas, concepts and subject matter in the visual arts; 4.5 investigates ways to develop meaning in their artworks; 4.6 selects different materials and techniques to make artworks; 4.7 explores aspects of practice in critical and historical interpretations of art; 4.8 explores the function of and relationships between artist—artwork—world— audience; 4.9 begins to acknowledge that art can be interpreted from different points of view; 4.10 recognises that art criticism and art history construct meanings.

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A structural exploration of design concepts & conventions utilising illuminated manuscripts & mosaics, which explore the postmodern practice of appropriation, to create two visual hybrids

Artist 4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.9, 4.10

Term 3 Faith, Hope & Fantasy A structural & subjective exploration of the cultural aspects of the medieval European world, using the procedures & conventions of sculpture to explore beliefs about & meanings relating to representations of Christianity Architecture, gargoyles, Jeff Koons, Shona Wilson 3D—Ceramics, assemblage

Conceptual Framework

Outcomes

Year 8

Practice

Art-making; critical and historical studies

Key artists/examples

Forms

4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.9, 4.10

World

Outcomes

Artwork

Cultural

World

Artist

Structural

Artwork

Conceptual Framework

Subjective

Pictures, Portraits & Words

Subjective

Frames

Frames

Term 4

2D—drawings, painting, lino printing

Forms

Audience

Postmodern

Audience

Postmodern

‘Venus of Willendorf’, Lascaux cave paintings; Aboriginal traditional painting; the pyramids; Hypostyle Hall at Karnak; King Menkure & his queen; Amenemheb of Thebes; Margaret Preston

Key artists/examples

Cultural

A cultural & postmodern exploration of Greek & Roman forms in the style of John Wolseley, incorporating text, collage, appropriation. To extend, an exploration of postmodern conventions of appropriation and some humour through digital imaging and collage

A cultural & structural exploration of art history, linking relevant examples to the Australian context. Beginning with prehistoric art and painting techniques, students explore cultural practices and social identity; design & printing techniques, procedures & conventions are then employed, to make works exploring the culture of Egypt through printmaking

Art-making; critical and historical studies

Structural

Heroes & temples

Stones, goddesses & tombs

Practice

Artwork

Structural

World

Cultural

Audience

Postmodern

Artwork

Structural

World

Cultural

4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.9, 4.10

Artist

Subjective

2D—Drawing; collage; design; monoprinting

Audience

Postmodern

Medieval mosaics; illuminated manuscripts; Christian iconic painting; Lin Onus, Kathleen Petyarre

4.1, 4.2, 4.3, 4.4, 4.5, 4.6, 4.7, 4.8, 4.9, 4.10

Artist

Subjective

2D & 4D—Painting, digital media, collage

Greek sculpture; Greek pottery; Greek architecture; Roman architecture; John Wolseley; Victory of Samothrace; the Parthenon; the Colosseum

Term 2

Term 1

Year 8

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Students investigate these aspects of visual language, being introduced to the structural frame, by critically exploring a range of artworks, including Venus of Willendorf, Stonehenge, Lascaux cave paintings, ‘Five Dreamings’, traditional Aboriginal rock art and bark paintings. Introduction to the role of the audience (general public, critics and other art specialists) in the interpretation of cultural artefacts and the analysis of visual codes, symbols and signs

Students are introduced to visual language of the elements of design (line, shape, tone, colour, texture, composition, pattern, space, size, proportion etc.) as well as the conventions of codes, symbols and signs through a variety of activities (worksheets, literacy exercises).

3 Artwork

1 Oral feedback from teacher in discussion; 2 Written feedback from teacher in diary assessment; and 3 Teacher observation of student processes and oral feedback.

Feedback:

1 Completed worksheets in the Visual Arts Personal Diary (VAPD), displaying rudimentary understandings of the elements; 2 Oral & written responses to discussion demonstrating understandings of the structural frame, the role of the audience in the analysis and interpretation of artworks; and 3 Resolved design demonstrates understandings of visual language and the conventions of colour, line, shape & composition.

Evidence of learning:

Utilising symbols and signs from Australian Aboriginal rock art & bark paintings, students create a graphic drawing, using the conventions of design, specifically colour, line and shape (Inks, VAPD, pencils). The drawings are to overlap in transparent layers in much the same way as do Aboriginal rock art images.

 

 

 

2 World

1 Artwork; structural frame

artwork; structural frame

Sign & date

Critical & historical studies

Art-making artwork audience; structural and cultural frames

Registration

Year 8, semester 1(a) teaching, learning & assessment activities

Table A.5 Banora Point High School, Visual Arts stage four, teaching, learning and assessment activities

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7 Artist

Artwork; Structural Frame

Audience; Structural Frame

(4) Oral feedback in discussion, reinforcement of concepts; (5) (7) Written feedback—assessment of practical tasks; (6) Observation of literacy task in the VAPD; and (7) Peer assessment of lino unit.

Feedback:

audience; art history

audience; art criticism

Critical evaluation of each others lino printing works. Each student selects one work to be examined by their neighbour (peer assessment worksheet).

8 Artwork

Students complete literacy comprehension task from ‘The Visual Arts’ text. Questions focus on the practice of art history (texts, worksheets).

6 Artwork

(4) Discussion demonstrating understandings of stated aspects of conceptual framework; (5) Work sample Egyptian design; (6) Literacy task completed in book; and (7) Work samples of lino prints.

Evidence of learning:

An exhibition is mounted in the classroom and students choose one other work to critically analyse (peer assessment worksheet).

9 Artwork

Using the above design as a basis, students are introduced to the conventions of printmaking by creating a black and white lino print which is then manipulated by hand colouring techniques and repeat printing. Students produce 4 x single print and one repeated print (4–6 repetitions), giving 5 prints in total. 

 

 

 

audience; cultural frame

Students explore aspects of Egyptian culture through the examination of the pyramids, The Hypostyle Hall of the Temple of Amon at Karnak, the sculpture of ‘King Menkure and his queen’ and the fresco of Amenemheb of Thebes. These discussions and observations are focused through the dynamic of world—artwork— audience and the cultural frame (texts, worksheets).

artwork

4 World

Students create a 15cm x 15cm design using symbols and signs evident in Egyptian art in their VAPD, (worksheets, textbooks, coloured pencils). 

artwork; cultural frame

Sign & date

Critical & historical studies

Art-making

5 World

Registration

Year 8, semester 1(b) teaching, learning & assessment activities

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artwork; postmodern frame

audience

artwork; postmodern frame

audience; art criticism; cultural frame

Students critically analyse the work of John Wolseley through discussion and a literacy exercise (texts, worksheets).

2 Artwork

Students investigate aspects of Greek Sculpture, Greek architecture and Roman architecture through the frames and critical/historical studies in Artwise No. 1 and Artwise No. 2. Questions emphasise elements of content (texts).

 

 

 

2 Artwork audience; art history; cultural frame

Sign & date

Registration Critical & historical studies

(1) Written feedback on mixed media task; (2) Oral feedback during discussion and observation of works in progress; and (4) Written feedback of diary work and postmodern exercise.

Feedback:

(1) Completed mixed media image; (3) Completed literacy exercises in VAPD; and (4) Completed figure in landscape works.

Evidence of learning:

Students manipulate 3 images of Greek sculpture (e.g. Venus de Milo, Victory of Samothrace, Doryphorous), adding contemporary clothing and landscapes. This is a postmodern interpretation of the classical Greek sculpture. Students add missing body parts and backgrounds to reinterpret each sculpture to a contemporary context. Humour, wit and satire are to be encouraged (photocopies, inks, pencils, textas).

4 Artwork

Students create a mixed media work emphasising the elements of line and shape in the style of John Wolseley. Two Greek sculptures, one Greek temple and the Colosseum are appropriated in pen, using overlapping and ink wash to complete the image. Text is then added by hand and by collage. The image is a sensitive postmodern interpretation of the classical, cultural ideas of Greece and Rome.

1 Artwork

Art-making

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7 Artwork

Ceramic theory, safety and procedures.

6 Artwork; structural frame

(1) (3) Oral feedback in discussion; (2) (3) (4) Written feedback in the assessment of written tasks, assignment; (3) (5) Written feedback on the art making tasks; (3) (7) Teacher observation of peer discussion and feedback in decoding artworks; and (all) Oral feedback.

Feedback:

(1) Oral discussions regarding medieval culture; (2) Written responses to architectural conventions in the diary; (3) Pen and ink studies / written responses in the visual arts diary; (4) Artworks (sculptures) demonstrating the evident understandings of structure, sculpture, visual language and symbolism; and (5) Peer assessment / interpretation of each others’ work.

Evidence of learning:

Written and verbal analysis of their own work.

audience; structural frame

artwork; structural frame

Through the conceptual framework and the frames, Students examine and analyse nonfigurative (preferably Australian) sculpture.

4 Assignment—CF, all frames

If materials permit, students create a sculpture of a gargoyle or fantasy creature in clay.

5 Artist

Class discussion regarding their work and peer- and self-evaluation of drawings in the diary.

Students investigate the conventions of medieval architecture—early Christian & Byzantine, Romanesque and Gothic—using a range of written materials from a historical/structural perspective. Emphasis is placed upon the development of technology and its relevance for the expression of cultural belief systems (Artwise No. 2, The Visual Arts, Caves to Canvas, worksheets). This investigation forms the foundation for the subsequent art-making activities. Notions of audience are discussed.

audience; cultural and structural frames

2 Artwork

audience; cultural frame

They make written responses to these drawings, using the language of the formal qualities of art; the writing is to appear on the drawing themselves (self-assessment sheet).

1 Artwork Students are introduced to the Medieval European world through the cultural frame. Links are made to the ancient world studied last year. Notions of cultural identity and cultural practices are discussed.

artwork; subjective and cultural frames

Students undertake a series of pen and ink studies exploring various structures e.g. buildings, the body, trees etc in their diaries. Composition is emphasised.

3 Artist

 

 

 

Sign & date

Art-making

Critical & historical studies

Registration

Year 8, semester 2a teaching, learning & assessment activities

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artwork; structural and postmodern frames

artwork; postmodern frame

audience; structural frame

(1) (3) Oral feedback in discussions; (3) Written feedback and assessment of body of work; and (4) (5) Oral feedback of artworks in progress.

Feedback:

artwork; all frames

audience; structural frame

Students examine self-portraits by a selection of Australian artists (e.g. Whiteley, Hester, Robinson) in order to create an Australian context for this artistic tradition. 

Students explore icons as both a cultural artefact and portrait convention through discussion.

3 Artwork

 They use scaffolds to analyse one example of each of the art forms above in which the artist uses imagery and text to represent experiences, ideas or perceptions of and about the medieval world.

2 Assignment: world

They are guided through a structural frame investigation of conceptual framework relations by a series of questions.

 

 

 

1 World Students are introduced to the medieval 2D art forms of icons, illuminated manuscripts and mosaics.

artwork; cultural frame

Sign & date

Registration Critical & historical studies

(1) Student responses to discussion, note making in diary; (2) Assignment responses indicating understandings of the conceptual framework and the frames; (3) Student responses to discussion, note making in diary; (4) Self-portrait icon; (5) Illuminated initial; and (6) Evaluative responses in VAD.

Evidence of learning:

Students record evaluative responses in the diary.

6 Artwork

Students create an illuminated Initial in the style of a medieval manuscript page, complete with a border. The work will also include at least one animal and/or fantasy creature. Students utilise design skills, with a particular emphasis on finish and presentation.

5 Artist

Text is added to the image at the end (using the literacy exercise on belief systems from semester 1).

Students create a self-portrait from a digital photograph of themselves in chalk pastel. Using collage, paint and ink, students complete a mixed media icon/mosaic image on paper.

4 World

Art-making

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artwork; structural frame

artist

artwork; subjective frame

artist; cultural frame

audience; structural frame

Students examine and analyse the work of artists who create site specific works (e.g. Goldsworthy, Christo, students work from Artexpress catalogues).

5 Artwork

Students write a 100-word statement about their own spiritual beliefs (or that of a culture of interest) in a directed literacy exercise. They identify significant descriptive adjectives and verbs.

3 World

Guided discussion and writing about the concept of the invisible (in this case, the concept of things like faith, the spiritual, emotions, truth etc), how artists have created material representations of intangible realities that are not of the material/ physical world.

2 World

(1) (2) (5) Oral feedback in discussions; (4) (6) Oral feedback on artworks in progress and assessment at end; and (4) (6) Written feedback on artworks through peer assessment at end.

Feedback:

(1) Critical writing in art diary; (2) Discussion responses, worksheets; (3) Literacy task in diary; (4) Body of work in diary; (5) Critical writing in diary; and (6) Three dimensional work.

Evidence of learning:

 

Students plan and create a sculpture / assemblage / site specific / work / documented forms. Logistics and processes will be planned in a very structured and thorough way.

6 Artist

Students discuss and write critically about selected examples.

 

 

 

artwork; cultural frame

Students examine the artworks of Australian artists who respond to spiritual concepts in their art-making (e.g. Aboriginal forms, Hossein Valamanesh, John Coburn, Arthur Boyd, John Wolseley, text reference, library: ‘Fire and Shadow’).

artist

1 World

Students create a body of drawings and experiments, collecting and developing personal images and symbols for the beliefs written about in the last task (e.g. rubbings, scanned images that are drawn on and cropped, gestural ink studies, other types of expressive mark making). This should be a major exploration of symbolism and materials.

artwork; subjective and structural frames

Sign & date

Critical & historical studies

Art-making

4 Artist

Registration

Year 8, semester 2c teaching, learning & assessment activities

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Unit for stage five Visual Arts Extract from a unit of work for stage four Visual Arts, written by Alexandra Cutcher, Banora Point High School

Specific outcomes will vary according to relevant state syllabus documents. Table A.6 Stage five Visual Arts Scope and sequence plan Quality Teaching All stage 4 & 5 programs have a historical emphasis. In this way significance is explored through the connections made to the History syllabus, thereby making clear connections to students’ prior or background knowledge. It also enables students to examine a wider variety of cultural knowledge. Each unit has been designed with sequenced learning activities to build confidence, develop autonomy and manage increasingly complex materials, concepts and procedures. Establishing this quality learning environment is enhanced by high and explicit expectations and the building of positive relationships. Intellectual quality is a strong feature of these units through the diverse and increasingly rigorous skills the students engage in, developing a deep knowledge and understanding about the world and the cultural practices of those who have inhabited it. The students constantly engage in meta-language and higher order thinking skills to communicate their ideas both visually and verbally and to critically analyse their own art practice and those of others. Problem solving, communication, cultural knowledge and knowledge integration are significant features of this program.  

Semester 1

Semester 2

Unit description

Truth, Beauty and Reason

The Renaissance: Fast and Loose

A cultural and structural exploration of the ideology and artistic conventions of the Renaissance in Europe. The focus this semester will be on traditional Renaissance techniques and concepts as well as the lives and work of the Great Masters.

A postmodern and subjective exploration of the ideology and artistic conventions of the Renaissance. The focus in second semester will be on appropriating and challenging these ideologies and conventions.

247-248

Students learn about Classicism. They will then examine the figure (proportions, anatomy etc), the figure in the landscape and the portrait. Devices such as allegory and narrative in painting will be explored. The notion of patronage will also be examined.

Students learn to examine Renaissance artworks from a postmodern perspective. They will then learn about artists who have appropriated classical images in their artmaking.

Outcomes

5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 5.5, 5.6, 5.7, 5.8, 5.9, 5.10

Key practitioners / examples

Giotto, ‘David’ by Donatello, Michelangelo, Bernini and Verocchio; anatomical drawings by Da Vinci and others; ‘The Tribute Money’ by Masaccio; ‘The Birth of Venus’ by Botticelli; Several portrayals of the crucifixion (and/ or the resurrection); ‘Vetruvian Man’ by Da Vinci; The Mona Lisa’ by Da Vinci. Any related Australian example.

The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown; ‘The Last Supper’ by Da Vinci; various examples of ‘The annunciation’, spiritual paintings by Colin McCahon, John Coburn; mixed media works in the Artexpress catalogues.

Art-making (forms)

Students will build a body of work that includes drawings (figure, proportions, anatomy studies), etchings (anatomy studies) and paintings (portraits). The emphasis will be on naturalism & technique.

Students will create a body of work around the ‘Annunciation’ as a concept, from the perspective of either Joseph or Mary. Works will be 2-dimensional but utilise mixed media techniques and appropriation.

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Table A.6 Stage five Visual Arts (continued) Assessment:

Frames Conceptual framework

1 2 3 4

Body of work (drawings); Body of work (etchings); Body of work (portraits); Visual arts diary: making activities; critical / historical studies; presentation; and 5 Assignment—case study of a Renaissance artist.

1 Body of work (the annunciation); 2 Diary-making activities—critical / historical studies; presentation; and 3 Assignment—Powerpoint presentation on a postmodern artist.

Subjective

Structural

Cultural

Postmodern

Subjective

Structural

Cultural

Postmodern

Artist

Artwork

World

Audience

Artists

Artwork

World

Audience

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(1) (2) (4) Verbal feedback in discussions; (3) (5) Verbal feedback during art-making; and (11) Written feedback when diary and body of work assessed.

Feedback:

(1) Critical analysis in diary; (2) Critical analysis in diary and worksheets; (3) Body of work (drawings); (4) Body of work (etchings); and (5) Etching theory in diary.

Evidence of learning:

Students then create a body of etchings, using plastic plates and dry point techniques. These can be manipulated by hand colouring and/or by digital techniques.

Students create several drawings based on the anatomical drawings discussed; also from anatomy texts, skeleton.

artwork; cultural frame

Examination of Australian printmakers (etching).

Etching processes techniques and safety.

6 Artwork; structural frame

Guided discussion—students examine anatomy drawings of Michelangelo and Da Vinci.

4 Artist

Students examine realism and figure proportions by examining ‘Vitruvius Man’ by Da Vinci and other significant examples of Renaissance drawings, paintings and sculptures. Students complete critical discussions and art making using visual language. Classical ideals of beauty, idealism and truth are also examined through revisiting Ancient Greece and Rome and making links to the concepts of the Renaissance.

artwork; structural frame

 

 

Students compile a body of drawings in the diary that focus on correct proportions. They explore life drawing; drawing figures from Renaissance paintings and sculptures, etc. Tonal modelling and form are also a focus. 2 Artist

1 Artist Linking the Medieval to the Renaissance, students learn about the rise of the individual artist and the beginnings of naturalism through the work of Giotto. Discussions and analysis.

3 Artwork; structural frame

5 Artwork; structural frame

Sign & date  

Critical & historical studies

Art-making artwork; cultural frame

Registration

Unit 1: year 9 teaching, learning & assessment activities

Table A.6 Stage five Visual Arts (continued)

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artist

A case study of a Renaissance artist.

3 Assignment—world

artwork; all frames

Analysis of the use of perspective, depth and space; as well as the placement of figures and composition.

(1) Oral responses / feedback in discussion; (3) Oral responses / feedback during the development of body of work; and (11) Written feedback of assessment of case study and bookmarks.

Feedback:

(1) Discussion responses; analyses and notes in diary; (2) Body of work—figures in landscapes; perspective exercises; and (3) Assignment responses.

Evidence of learning:

 

 

 

 

 Examination of Renaissance portraits of the figure in the landscape (eg ‘Birth of Venus’; The Tribute Money’; ‘Creation of Adam’; The Last Supper’; ‘Virgin of the Rocks’; etc) Discussion is focused on visual symbolism, allegories and narratives, critical analysis of examples.

artwork; cultural & structural frames

1 World

Body of work is created from technical exercises such as placing cut out figures from the previous unit into a painted background, perspective drawings (technical exercises).

artwork; structural frame

Sign & date

Critical & historical studies

Art-making

2 Artist

Registration

Unit 2: year 9 teaching, learning & assessment activities

Table A.6 Stage five Visual Arts (continued)

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(1) (4) Oral feedback in discussions; (2) Oral feedback and advice during art-making; (3) Oral feedback in evaluations; and (all) Written feedback when visual arts diary assessed.

Feedback:

(1) (4) Discussion responses; analyses written analyses; (2) Self-portrait; and (3) Written & verbal evaluations in visual arts diary.

Evidence of learning:

Evaluation of self-portrait through an exhibition and peer evaluation.

audience; structural frame

artist

artwork; cultural frame

Patrons and issues of power in the Renaissance world are discussed. Key examples included the patronage of the Medici’s and the completion of the Sistine Chapel.

4 World

 

 

Exploration of Renaissance portrait with a particular emphasis on the ‘Mona Lisa’. Guided discussions and written analysis of Renaissance portrait conventions. Examination of the process of commissions.

Students complete a detailed self-portrait of themselves in paint from a digital photo of themselves posed as the Mona Lisa. The background will be taken from either the original or some other landscape the student devices. 

3 Artwork

 

1 World

2 Artwork; structural frame artwork; cultural & structural frames

Sign & date

Critical & historical studies

Registration

Art-making

Unit 3: year 9 teaching, learning & assessment activities

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