Ancient Greek Myths. 5 Mini Plays. Written By Sue Russell

Ancient Greek Myths 5 Mini Plays Written By Sue Russell Sue Russell Copyright 2007 © 1 Ancient Greek Myths Play 1: Odysseus and the Cyclops Speak...
Author: Shanon Short
3 downloads 0 Views 953KB Size
Ancient Greek Myths 5 Mini Plays Written By Sue Russell

Sue Russell Copyright 2007 ©

1

Ancient Greek Myths Play 1: Odysseus and the Cyclops Speakers Poseidon: God of the Seas, and Father of Polyphemus Polyphemus (Cyclops) Cyclops 2 Odysseus Greek warrior 1 Greek warrior 2 Play 2 Theseus and the Minotaur Speakers: Theseus Aegeus (father of Theseus, King of Athens) Minotaur (Man’s body, bull’s head) Pasiphae (Minotaur’s Mum, Queen of Crete) Minos (King of Crete, son of Zeus) Ariadne (Minotaur’s half-sister, daughter of Minos and Pasiphae) Play 3 Tale of Two Spinners Speakers Arachne Arachne’s mother Zeus (king of gods) Athene – goddess of wisdom and war (daughter of Zeus)

Spider

Play 4 The Gorgon’s Head Speakers: Polydectes (king of Seriphos) Danae (whom Polydectes wished to be his wife) Perseus (son of Danae) Athene (goddess of wisdom and aunt of Perseus) Enyo (one of three Grey Ones) Medusa (one of three Gorgon sisters) Play 5 (i) Pandora’s Box Speakers Pandora Epimetheus (brother of Prometheus) Prometheus (creator of mankind) Zeus (king of the gods) Vice Hope Play 5 (ii) Pandora’s Box (short version) Speakers: Pandora Epimetheus Prometheus Zeus Vice Hope

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

Spiderboy

2

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

3 Play 1: Odysseus and the Cyclops Brief synopsis of story Odysseus and his men, returning home from the Trojan War, stopped off at an island inhabited by Cyclops. They ‘set up camp’ in the cave of one of these Cyclops, named Polyphemus. When Polyphemus found them there, he ate two of them and kept the rest prisoner by blocking the entrance with a boulder. During the day, when Polyphemus was out with his sheep, Odysseus and his men prepared a stake from a tree trunk; and in the evening, Odysseus tricked Polyphemus first into believing his name was Nobody and then into drinking enough wine to make him very drunk and sleepy. When Polyphemus was ‘out for the count’, Odysseus and his men drove the burning stake into the Cyclops’ only eye, and when the other Cyclops came running to help, they were told “It is Nobody” so they went away. Odysseus and his men escaped from Polyphemus by tying themselves to the undersides of his sheep. Speakers Poseidon: God of the Seas, and Father of Polyphemus Polyphemus (Cyclops) Cyclops 2 Odysseus Greek warrior 1 Greek warrior 2 Poseidon:

So what’s this I hear about my son being blinded by a mere mortal? Polyphemus: ‘Tis true, father. A despicable act if ever there was one! (Sneering) And by a so-called hero! Odysseus: That would be me! Victor of the Trojan war. Greek warrior 1: Er, not single-handed, I think. Greek warrior 2: No, there were one or two others of us in that famous Trojan horse. Polyphemus: In that famous horse? I hope there was no cruelty involved. My dad’s very keen on horses. Odysseus: And you, on sheep! But that didn’t stop you eating them! Greek warriors1&2: Or us! Odysseus: So much for the sacred rules of hospitality! Poseidon: What’s this, Polyphemus? What have I told you about upsetting your uncle Zeus? He didn’t make up those rules of hospitality for nothing! Besides, having bad table manners is one thing, but eating your guests? Please tell me they’re making it up? Greek warrior 1: ‘Fraid not, Poseidon. Let me tell you a few home truths about this one-eyed monster of yours! Polyphemus (interrupting) Now, there’s no need to get personal! Greek warrior 2: Oh no? Difficult not to when you’ve seen your comrades in arms picked up and bashed against a cave wall before being swallowed in one gulp! Polyphemus: Not strictly true. I did have a real good chew, first! Lots of bones an’ things. Could get quite crunchy!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

4 Poseidon: Cyclops 2: Poseidon (indignantly): Cyclops 2: Greek warrior 1: Poseidon (sighing): Polyphemus: Odysseus: Greek warrior 2 (laughing): Cyclops 2: Polyphemus: Greek warrior 1: Odysseus: Polyphemus: Poseidon: Odysseus: Polyphemus (angrily): Odysseus: Cyclops 2: Polyphemus: (sarcastically): Poseidon: Cyclops 2:

Enough! Enough! Did I teach you no social graces when you were growing up? And don’t you remember me saying how much easier fish was to digest? If only I’d kept you with me, in the oceans … What? Charging around with you, on your dolphin-driven chariot? A much ‘greener’ option than driving around in a motor boat, wouldn’t you say? If you want to be ‘green around the gills’! That would be me after just 5 minutes at sea! Haven’t you heard, us Cyclops choose to be land-dwellers. In caves! Whatever happened to your training as blacksmiths? My brother Zeus would be so disappointed if he could see you today! And what’s wrong with looking after sheep? Being a shepherd – a noble trade, I’d say! And one not requiring too much brain! Yes, we’ve heard how being a blacksmith was just a little bit too taxing for you! Did being born with only one eye mean you were only born with half a brain? How rude! Though I guess it was a shame we forgot our old blacksmith skills. Even though I would never have driven a red-hot stake into the eye of any creature. Not even one that was holding you captive, and eating 2 men for breakfast and supper, every day? Real convenience food, we were! Well, you did make a welcome change from lamb stew! Enough! Here I am, trying to defend you, Polyphemus, and all you can do is confirm their story! What are you? Stupid, or something? Er, I’d say ‘Stupid’ summed him up pretty well! There you go again! Pitting your razor sharp wits against my, well, er, slightly blunter wits. That’s just not fair! And nor was using your superior strength, to keep that boulder wedged across the entrance to your cave, preventing us from leaving! So why didn’t you tell us, brother, what was going on? Er, what bit of ‘Help! I’ve been blinded!’ didn’t you understand? Yes, you could hear his screaming and hollering right across the oceans! But you said, ‘It’s Nobody’. And then went on to actually repeat ‘Nobody has done this to me’. So we Cyclops naturally thought you were dreaming.

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

5 Polyphemus: Cyclops 2: Odysseus: Poseidon: Greek warrior 2: Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Poseidon:

Cyclops 2: Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Poseidon: Odysseus: Poseidon: Polyphemus: Odysseus: Greek warrior 1: Polyphemus: Cyclops 2: Polyphemus: Greek warrior 2: Odysseus: Poseidon:

But it was Nobody who did it to me! So why are you making all the fuss? If Nobody is to blame, then you have no case to argue! Oh dear! And this is after it’s all been explained! No wonder these Cyclops got a reputation for being a thick lot! The shame of it! Old Polyphemus here really wasn’t much of a match for our leader, Odysseus, was he? Unfortunately for him, not. But fortunately for us! Or we’d have ended up like those of our mates who didn’t manage to dodge his greedy fingers! OK, so you were never going to be the smartest breed on earth. But surely you could have put up a bit more of a fight? I mean, how did you let these men actually get up onto your chest, in order to drive that burning stake into your eye? Good question, bruv. You might be a bit slow at times, but surely not quite that dopey? But that’s just what he was! Dopey! Through drinking far too much wine. Oh the ills of alcohol! What was he thinking of? Not a lot, I suspect, as he tipped back goblet after goblet full of wine! Son! I am disappointed in you! But I’d never tasted wine before! It made such a nice change from goat’s milk! How was I to know the effect it would have? Poor simple fool! I would say, “as a lamb to the sacrifice”, but that hardly seems fair! Well, not to his woolly friends, no! But I was tricked! Not only did he tell me his name was Nobody, so no-one listened when I called out for help. But he fooled me into thinking he was my friend, by offering me all that wine! And then he goes and stabs you? In the eye! Correct! Some friend, huh? Well, he was hardly going to sit back and wait for all his men to be eaten. No, even if he did agree to leave me ‘til last! But how did they escape? Surely you thought to check your sheep before letting them leave the cave, the next morning? Or (in disgust) did you just have too much of a hangover to think of even that?

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

6 Polyphemus (indignantly): Poseidon: Polyphemus (sarcastically): Odysseus: Greek warrior 1: Odysseus: Polyphemus: Odysseus: Polyphemus: Cyclops 2: Odysseus: Greek warrior 2 (sarcastically): Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Greek warrior 1: Poseidon: Odysseus: Poseidon: Odysseus: Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2:

Odysseus: Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Poseidon:

Hangover? Is that all you think I was suffering from? What about that small matter of a burning stake being driven into my one and only eye? And after all I warned you about ‘keeping an eye on your enemies’! A simple piece of advice, but clearly not simple enough! Well, thanks for the sympathy vote, dad! It means a lot to me! Maybe you are being a little harsh on him, Poseidon. It was quite a neat trick of Odysseus, tying his men underneath the sheep. Poor Polyphemus never thought to search there! Though I thought my time was up when you, Polyphemus, spotted that your favourite sheep was leaving last, instead of her usual first. Bah! I should have realised! Baaaa indeed! I still can’t believe you fell for my baaaaa, when you questioned your favourite! And to think I thought I was an expert in sheep-speak! How wrong could you be! But hey! Don’t beat yourself up too much about it! After all, you were up against one of the sharpest minds of all time! And who might that be, I wonder! Clever he might have been, our leader, Odysseus. But he sure wasn’t humble! No. I seem to remember another occasion when a little humility might not have gone amiss. You’re thinking of that great Trojan Horse, aren’t you? Correct! Ah yes. As you mentioned earlier on. Do tell! I have a certain interest in horses, being god of them. So please – tell me about this Trojan one. I don’t believe he’s one of mine! No, he wouldn’t be. Nothing like your Pegasus! My beautiful flying horse! No, this one was built out of wood! No good in the air, but wicked on the ground! Huge, it was! Big enough to hold an army! And that’s just what it did! You’d never have been able to tell from the outside – that us armed soldiers were all on the inside; waiting ‘til nightfall to climb out, under cover of darkness, and defeat the Trojans, right within their city and right under their very noses! What a brainwave! We’d never have got inside the city of Troy without that horse! What inspired leadership! And what arrogance! Yes. We respected his bravery and courage as our leader. But was conveniently forgetting it was Athene’s idea such a noble act? You mean, Athene, goddess of wisdom? And war? My niece?

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

7 Cyclops 2: Polyphemus: Poseidon: Polyphemus (scratching head): Odysseus (defensively): Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Poseidon: Polyphemus: Poseidon: Polyphemus (sighing): Cyclops 2: Odysseus: Cyclops 2: Poseidon: Polyphemus: Poseidon: Odysseus (sarcastically): Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Poseidon: Polyphemus: Cyclops 2: Poseidon: Odysseus (gasping): Poseidon: Odysseus: Poseidon: Polyphemus:

Wait a minute. Too much information! Yes. Slow down a little. Who was this Athene? Only the daughter of the great king of all gods, Zeus, my brother! I never could keep up with that family! So she might have thought up the idea of the Trojan Horse first. But I hope you lads never forget who led you into battle and won! I don’t suppose there’s any chance we’ll be allowed to forget, do you? No chance! Which is why we’re all standing around, chatting today! Something tells me this is more than just a social call. Indeed, son. You have undoubtedly done wrong. I thought we’d covered all that. Do we have to go over it all again? Oh please, not. Us Cyclops might be a little slow … That’s an understatement! But even I have got the gist of it! Polyphemus, bruv, you sure need to work on your table manners! And be a little more welcoming to strangers in future! Even ones wielding burning hot staves? Well, if you hadn’t imprisoned them … Anyway. You’re not the one I’m here to discipline, today. Now, why doesn’t that surprise me?! Something tells me he’s in for a slight dressing down! About time he got down from his high horse, if you ask me! Well nobody did! So like your high and mighty leader here, please take time to listen and do not interrupt me again! I’d do as he says, if I were you. That trident he carries around with him, it isn’t just for decoration! No, he can wield a pretty mean thunderbolt or two, or so I’ve heard! Indeed I can! So silence, whilst I speak! It is you, oh mighty Odysseus, who needs to pay particular attention! You and your arrogant ways! Me?! Yes, you. Have you heard nothing your men have been saying? Loyal and brave-hearted as they are, nobody respects a big-head! No I don’t! Oh very quick, Odysseus! (Sarcastically) You leave the rest of us way behind in your clever word games! Pardon? Did I miss something?

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

8 Cyclops 2 (whispering): Poseidon: Odysseus:

Poseidon:

Greek warrior 1: Greek warrior 2: Poseidon: Polyphemus: Cyclops 2: Odysseus: Poseidon (coughing):

Polyphemus Plus Cyclops 2:

Er, I think this is where we just listen, bruv. Thank you! Let’s not add to this man’s inflated ego by falling for yet more tricks, on his part. I wish you would just come out and say what is bothering you, Poseidon! I realise it can’t be very flattering having a son ….. (hesitating) ……quite like this one. But that’s no reason for your being jealous of my superior intellect! Enough of this! Your big-headedness will be your downfall! I have run out of patience with you. If you will not heed my advice, so be it! You dared to blind my son, here, Polyphemus. Yet you might have got away with it. If he hadn’t opened his big mouth, as we sailed away And actually shouted out that it was he, Odysseus, who had committed the crime! Stupid or what?! I’d say … stupid! Looks like I’ve got competition, after all! As stupid as us? Never! I don’t suppose any of us will argue with that! As I was saying. You might have got away with it, Odysseus. But due to your boastful ways, I now know who to direct my storms at for the next 10 years. I’m sure your soldiers here will have plenty of time to thank you for letting me know it was you! Enjoy your trip home! I hope you’ve got plenty of sea-sickness pills! I think you might need them! Bon voyage!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

9

Quiz 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

How were Polyphemus and Poseidon related? (Son and Father) What war did Odysseus fight in? (Trojan War) Who was Poseidon’s brother? (Zeus) What animals pulled Poseidon’s chariot? (Dolphins) Where did Cyclops live? (In caves, on land) What animals did Cyclops look after? (Sheep) What trade had Zeus originally trained the Cyclops for? (Blacksmiths) How did Polyphemus prevent Odysseus and his men from escaping from his cave? (By rolling a boulder across its entrance) 9. Why did the Cyclops not help Polyphemus? (Because he kept saying ‘It’s Nobody’ and ‘Nobody has done this to me’) 10. What did Odysseus use to dull Polyphemus’s senses ..even more? (Wine) 11. What weapon did Odysseus and his men use to blind Polyphemus? (A burning stake) 12. How did Odysseus and his men escape in the end? (Tied underneath the sheep, as they left the cave) 13. Who nearly ‘blew the whistle’ on Odysseus as the last one out? (Polyphemus’s favourite sheep) 14. Why? (She usually went out first) 15. What did Odysseus say in reply to Polyphemus’s query about this? (Baaa !) 16. Why was Poseidon particularly interested in the Trojan Horse? (He was god of horses) 17. What was the name of his famous flying horse? (Pegasus) 18. Why would the Trojan horse never fly? (Made of wood) 19. Who did it hide inside? (Greek warriors under Odysseus) 20. What did the Trojan Horse succeed in doing? (Getting Greek army into the city of Troy) 21. Whose idea was it? (Athene’s) 22. What was she goddess of? (Wisdom and war) 23. Who was her dad? (Zeus) 24. What might Poseidon use to deliver his thunderbolts? (His trident) 25. What did Odysseus’s arrogance lead him to do? (Boast/call out that it was he who had blinded Polyphemus) 26. What was his punishment? (10 years of storms, sent by Poseidon)

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

10

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

11

Play 2 Theseus and the Minotaur Brief synopsis of story When King Minos of Crete tried to trick Poseidon out of his best bull (his yearly offering), he was punished by getting a half-man half bull son called the Minotaur. Minos imprisoned his wife and son in a labyrinth under his palace at Knossos; and when his eldest son, Androgeus, was killed in Athens, demanded that the Athenian king, Aegeus, send 7 young men and 7 young women to Crete every 7 years, as punishment (nobody knowing their fate i.e. that they were fed to the Minotaur). This continued until the son of Aegeus, Theseus, decided to put an end to it. He was helped by the daughter of Minos, Ariadne, and succeeded in killing the Minotaur but tragically forgot to change the sails on his returning ship, from black to white, so his father thought he had died, and, in despair, threw himself off the cliff. Speakers: Theseus Aegeus (father of Theseus, King of Athens) Minotaur (Man’s body, bull’s head) Pasiphae (Minotaur’s Mum, Queen of Crete) Minos (King of Crete, son of Zeus) Ariadne (Minotaur’s half-sister, daughter of Minos and Pasiphae) Pasiphae: Aegeus: Minos: Theseus: Pasiphae: Minotaur: Minos: Pasiphae: Aegeus: Minos: Aegeus: Theseus: Ariadne: Aegeus: Theseus: Ariadne: Minos: Minotaur:

Pasiphae:

This is a tale of two cities. Athens And Crete. It has vile villains A noble hero A wronged wife And a hideous monster. It is a tale of deceit Of shame Of murder Of revenge Of sacrifice Of bravery Of love Of victory And of terrible tragedy. So let’s see how this tale unfolds. Starting with the deceit. You mean, of my wife ‘going off’ with a white bull, and then bearing its son? Some father you were! You might make fun of my father, that magnificent white bull. But if you hadn’t so shamefully kept him for yourself when you should have given him to Poseidon, none of this mess would have happened! Indeed. What a foolish gamble! To give Poseidon your second best bull, when the deal was that you give him your best each and every year. Did you really think you’d get away with it?

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

12 Minos: Ariadne:

It was a stupid mistake, I admit. I’ll say. Even as a mere girl, I knew how much our people of Crete depended on the sea – for food and defence. Our ships needed Poseidon’s protection. And you were prepared to risk that, by upsetting Poseidon, just so that you could keep that bull, rather than give it away as sacrifice. Theseus: Greedy and extremely foolish, I’d say. Minos (aside): If there’s one thing I can’t stand it’s a full-of-himself, self-satisfied hero! So easy to say what’s right and what’s wrong after the event. What a great thing is hindsight! Minotaur: Oh do stop your whingeing! Anyone would think it was you that suffered the consequences of your bad judgement! Pasiphae: Huh! If only! When he found out about Minos’s deceit, Poseidon made me fall in love with the white bull my husband had kept back, and so I gave birth to Minotaur: Me! Minos: A monster truly horrible to behold! Minotaur(sarcastically)I see compassion and pity are still high on your list of fatherly qualities. Minos: It was just so shameful having a son …. Like you! Half man, half beast. What else could I have been expected to do, other than hide you away? Pasiphae: With me! In a labyrinth, under your palace at Knossos. Minotaur: With no escape. No light. No warmth. Just left to die. Had you no shame? Pasiphae: How could you? Minotaur: To have me as a son was your fault! Aegeus: And then you learnt what it was to suffer. Pasiphae: To lose our eldest and favourite son, Androgeus! A victim of such foul play! Aegeus: A terrible crime, committed in my city of Athens. And at such an event! Theseus: Poor lad. Taking part in those Games - his only sin that of being a great athlete and competitor. How tragic that his life should be taken by lesser mortals, ones made mad by jealousy. Ariadne: My dear brother. Taken from us by a group of brutish thugs. Probably nephews of Aegeus, but needless to say, far too cowardly to come forward and admit to their heinous crime. Aegeus: Yes. And thanks to their wickedness, our city was to suffer the loss of 7 fair young men and women, once every 7 years from that time on. A terrible revenge to wreak on our fair city. Minos: But it was justified! The sacrifice of those 7 men and 7 women every 7 years went some way towards righting the wrong your city did to ours. Aegeus: Our poor youth! Little did those human sacrifices realise what awaited them when they left the boat at Crete.

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

13 Minotaur:

Me! But spare me a thought. I had to eat! And there they were, left to wander around my maze. I did the kind thing! If I hadn’t eaten them, they’d only have died of starvation. There was no way of finding your way out of that maze once you were inside. That court architect, Daedalus, certainly knew his stuff! Ariadne: Not a happy tale up ‘til now. Not for anyone! Theseus: Thank goodness for heroes, eh? Just as well I was on hand to save the day! Minos (sarcastically): But even you, oh great Theseus, would have found it impossible to kill the Minotaur without my daughter’s help. Ariadne: Thanks, Dad! I was wondering when he’d get round to acknowledging my part in the happy ending. Minos: You can’t say I didn’t warn you about these heroes and their egos! Ariadne: I guess. But then love is blind. The minute he stepped off that boat, along with the other Athenian youth to be sacrificed, I fell for him hook, line and sinker! Theseus: Yes, I remember you trying to ‘reel me in’ almost before I got off the boat! You certainly didn’t hang about! My dad had warned me about pushy Cretan ladies – but I hadn’t realised they’d be quite that forward! Ariadne: Can’t say that I remember you putting up much of a fight! Theseus: Well, yours was the best offer of the day! That being, a sword and ball of thread with which to find my way out of the maze. Ariadne (grunting): He might have been a hero. But he certainly wouldn’t have won me over in the romantic stakes! Aegeus: My son! He knew what he was there for and he succeeded! Minotaur: Only because he had an unfair advantage! Giving him a sword, indeed! That wasn’t in the rules! He’d have been yet another failed matador, dangling from one of my horns, if it hadn’t been for the sword! (Turning to Ariadne) Thanks for nothing, half-sis! Pasiphae: But sadly, even more tragedy was to follow. Ariadne might not have proved the perfect daughter Minotaur: Or half sister! Pasiphae: But Theseus was to prove less than a perfect son! Minos Oh excellent! You mean, this hero wasn’t as wonderful as he’d have us believe? Do tell, I can’t wait to hear! Theseus: It was no laughing matter. My poor father. Surely you can find it in your heart to feel sorry for another old man who thought he’d lost his eldest son? Just like you felt about Androgeus, all those years ago. Minos: I’ll never forget the pain of that loss. But you returned! Wasn’t he delighted to see you? Theseus: He should have been. But in my haste to return home, I forgot my father’s last words to me when I sailed off to Crete.

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

14 Aegeus: Ariadne: Minotaur: Theseus: Minos: Pasiphae: Theseus: Minos: Minotaur: Pasiphae: Aegeus: Ariadne: Theseus: Minos: Pasiphae: Minotaur: Theseus: Minos: Pasiphae:

I asked that he change the sails on his ship from black to white on his return, if he was on board and alive. So when I saw his ship returning, with black sails, I jumped to the conclusion he was dead. And jumped off the nearest cliff! Not such a happy home-coming! Excuse me if I don’t shed too many tears on your behalf! You’re excused! You were, after all, another tragic victim, in your own way, in this sorry story. OK. OK. Yes, I am feeling guilty. Riddled with it, in fact. Satisfied? Look! I put my hands up! It was my fault this all came about. At last! You’ve no idea how long that apology has taken in coming! Still, better late than never, as they say. We’ve all suffered, in some way, from that first fateful mistake. Let’s hope the gods show greater mercy on us, in future dealings. And that we face up to our faults And don’t try and brush the truth under the carpet Or down in the depths of the earth! And don’t take our grief out on innocent by-standers. Maybe we should all take more time to consider the consequences of our actions And have the humility to recognise that we all make mistakes However great we think we are! So this tale of two cities comes to an end. We were all victims – either of our own personal failings, or of those of others. But as with all great stories, this one has taught us many lessons. So let’s hope the lessons are learnt And then our suffering may be lessened. We must all take responsibility for our actions. And then, let’s hope, the world will be a happier place.

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

15 Quiz 1. What was the name of the father of Theseus? (Aegeus) 2. He was the king of which city? (Athens) 3. Who was the king of Crete? (Minos) 4. What was the name of his wife? (Pasiphae) 5. What was the name of their daughter? (Ariadne) 6. What was the name of her half-brother? (The Minotaur) 7. Who would you say was a ‘vile villain’ (Minos, or nephews of Aegeus) 8. Who was the hero? (Theseus) 9. Who was the wronged wife? (Pasiphae) 10. Who was deceitful? (Minos) 11. Who did he lie to? (Poseidon) 12. Why was Poseidon so important to Crete? (God of the sea so he controlled the fate of fishing boats and ships defending the city) 13. How did Minos try to keep Poseidon happy? (By sacrificing his best bull each year to him) 14. How did he fall out of favour with Poseidon? (He kept back his best bull, and sacrificed only his second best bull to Poseidon) 15. What did Poseidon do when he found out? (Made Minos’ wife fall in love with the best bull) 16. What did Minos do to hide his shame? (Hid his wife, Pasiphae, and her son, the Minotaur, away in a labyrinth under the Palace of Knossos) 17. What was the name of the eldest son of Minos? (Androgeus) 18. In what city did he die? (Athens) 19. What was he doing there? (Taking part in the Games) 20. Who killed him? (Nephews of Aegeus) 21. Why did they kill him? (Out of jealousy for his fine sportsmanship) 22. How many youths did Minos demand as sacrifice, once every 7 years? (14: 7 young men and 7 young women) 23. What was their ‘fate’? (Thrown into the maze where they were eaten by the Minotaur) 24. What was the name of the architect who designed the labyrinth? (Daedalus) 25. Who helped Theseus? (Ariadne) 26. Why? (She fell in love with him) 27. How did she help Theseus? (Gave him a sword and a ball of thread) 28. Why was the thread useful? (To find his way back) 29. What did Theseus forget to do on his return trip home? (Change the sails from black to white) 30. Why was this so important? (It was a sign to Aegeus that he was alive) 31. What conclusion did Aegeus jump to? (That his son was dead) 32. Where did he jump off? (A cliff) 33. Name 2 lessons Minos should have learnt. (To take responsibility for his actions – admit to when he has done wrong instead of covering up the truth, however unpleasant; learn to cope with his grief without making other innocent people suffer)

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

16

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

17 Play 3 Tale of 2 Spinners Brief synopsis of story Arachne was a very arrogant girl who bragged about her own spinning skills and upset Athene, goddess of spinning. They had a competition, both producing beautiful tapestries; but Arachne remained unrepentant and boastful and would have been strangled by Athene had it not been for the intervention of her mother who succeeded with her pleas for Arachne’s life. Arachne was spared her life but then turned into a spider, to spin away her remaining years. Speakers Arachne Arachne’s mother Zeus (king of gods) Spider Spiderboy Athene – goddess of wisdom and war (daughter of Zeus) Zeus: Athene: Spider: Arachne’s mum: Arachne: Spiderboy: Athene: Spider: Zeus:

Spider: Arachne’s mum: Spiderboy: Spider: Athene: Arachne: Arachne’s mum: Zeus: Athene: Spiderboy: Arachne’s mum:

So who’s been getting you so upset, daughter? It’s those mortals, again, dad. They just don’t know when to stop! And what about you meddling with nature? Just look what you’ve done to my daughter! Ooh! But who do we have here? I hope you’re not looking to me to get you out of this mess? I’ve got a lot more serious things on my hands than sorting out the likes of you! Here! Here! She got herself into this mess. Let her get out of it herself! Silence! Instead of all this bickering, perhaps someone round here would care to explain to me, what on earth is going on? And what would you, Athene, be doing down there, when you know you should be up here, with the rest of us gods? Meddling, as I said! My daughter wouldn’t be crawling around on 6 legs and catching flies for tea, if it weren’t for her! And what’s wrong with that? I advise a little more tact from you, Madam, unless you want to end up like your daughter here. Well said! Us spiders are tired of all the bad press we get from you mortals! Being afraid of spiders! Whatever next! That’s called ‘arachnophobia’ isn’t it? Now I wonder where that name comes from! That would be me! The shame! To think I’ll go down in history as having mothered a spider! Well, if you think that’s weird, you want to spend a day or two with us gods! You wouldn’t believe some of the creatures I’ve fathered! And let’s not talk about some of the women who’ve mothered them! No wonder Mum was always trying to catch you out! Some chance! He was an even faster mover than me! Men! Never around when you need them! Poor Arachne had nobody but me to look out for her when that beastly goddess of

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

18 wisdom strung my daughter up by the very thread they’d used for weaving! Athene: Well, if your precious daughter hadn’t been quite so big-headed in the first place, then there would have been no need for that competition! Zeus: Competition? What competition? Whoever heard of a god or goddess taking on a mere mortal in a competition? What have you been up to, Athene? Athene: I was provoked, father! Honest, I was! Arachne: Just because she overheard me saying I was the greatest weaver in the world! That I could out-weave any goddess any day! That mine was the skill to surpass all skills! That …. Spider: Yes, yes. I think we get the picture! Thank goodness someone shut her up! Zeus: A blatant misuse of your powers, daughter! Spiderboy: I’ll say! To think what happened to me when I got careless! Zeus: Well, that’s another story! And I think that’ll be more than covered in any future movies Arachne: Ooh! Does that mean I’ll be going to Hollywood too? Arachne’s mum: Not if I have anything to do with it! I hear there are some right weird folk that hang out there! Spiderboy: Unlike your daughter, of course! Arachne: Hey! No one tells me where I can and cannot hang out! Spider: Just from the rafters, I suspect, from now on! Arachne: You mean, I can’t be a movie star like him? Athene: Not if I have anything to do with it! This was meant to be a punishment, not a reward! Zeus: So, what happened to the tapestries you both created in this competition? I’d like to see them! Arachne: Oops! I don’t think so! Zeus: Athene! What does she mean? Spider: Oh dear! This is where it could get messy! I think I might just scuttle off now before things get too heated! Zeus: What does he mean? Why should these tapestries upset me? Arachne’s mum: Just when I thought things couldn’t get any worse! Oh daughter, what have you done? Arachne: Seemed like a good idea at the time! How was I to know Zeus would turn up? Zeus: Enough! You women test my patience to its limits! I demand to see the tapestries … or one of these thunderbolts will be heading in your direction! Spiderboy: Time to take cover! Even us superheroes of the big screen are no match for the big daddy of the gods! Zeus: You’d do well to heed my warning! So come on! Let me see what you two have been up to! Athene: Tell you what. Let’s start with mine!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

19 Arachne:

Good idea. (Aside) This could buy me enough time to make a speedy exit! Zeus: Not so fast, you! Stay exactly where you are! You’re next! Arachne: Of course, sir! As if I’d want to miss my turn … on the barbeque! Spider: She’s got that part right! I’ve heard barbequed spiders is one of Zeus’s favourites! Athene: Here, father. This is my tapestry entitled ‘The Power of the Gods’. Zeus: Ah! There’s me! Looking very regal, if I might say so! And there’s Poseidon with his trident, and you Athene with that olive tree. Hmm. Nothing to worry about there! Arachne’s mum: What about those poor mortals, in the four corners? Why are they all looking so upset? Spider: Might it have anything to do with the fact they all did something wrong and were punished for it? Athene: That’s right! Not bad for a spider! Your powers of observation are a credit to you! As for you, Arachne. It’s a shame you didn’t have a better look! These pictures were intended as a warning to you! Arachne: What? This one showing someone turned into a frozen mountain? Athene: That would be Rhodope. Arachne: And this one showing someone else turned into a bird? Athene: That would be Antigone. Arachne’s mum: And what about this one showing a mother crying for her daughters? Athene: I thought you’d notice that one! Another mother like you, called Cinyras. She’s crying over her dead daughters. At least your daughter’s not dead! Spider: Not yet! But just wait ‘til Zeus sees her tapestry! Zeus: OK. So where’s yours, Arachne? With all that skill you’ve been boasting about, I must say I’m rather surprised at your reluctance to show me your fine work! Arachne: Er, can’t this wait? Spiderboy: Certainly not! I, for one, have many pressing matters to attend to. Like saving the earth! Arachne: Does that include me? Oh help! Now I’m for it! Athene: You certainly are! And if you thought my anger was frightening, you ain’t seen nothing yet! When my dad gets going ….. you really don’t want to be around! Arachne: Thank you for those few kind words! You’ve reassured me tremendously! Athene: Perhaps next time you’ll think before you leap ….or, in your case, before you weave! Zeus: So what do we have here? Ahha! There’s dear Bacchus doing what he does best! Spider: What? Dangling in front of that woman, in the form of a bunch of grapes? Zeus: Well, he is the god of wine and that was one way of getting close to the woman he loved!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

20 Athene:

And there’s my brother Apollo. Not such the goody two shoes he’s usually made out to be. Trying to trick that poor girl, Isse. Though how she fell for him dressed up as a shepherd, I’ll never know! Zeus: And there’s my brother, Poseidon! The old scoundrel! Always chasing the women! Arachne: Unlike someone else we could mention! Zeus: I hope you’re not suggesting I was ever anything but the model husband? Arachne: Of course not, sir! Spider: Oh dear! Here we go! Zeus (roaring): So what is the meaning of this? Me as a bull? Me as a swan? Me as some gold coins? And why am I pictured with all these women? Arachne: Why? Well, I thought that would be obvious to one as clever as you! Surely you can see from their eyes that they all adore you? Zeus: Well, yes … Arachne: And that they all obviously think the world of you? Zeus: Yes … Arachne: And that they all clearly worship the very ground you stand on? Zeus: Understandably so. I am the greatest of the gods, as everyone knows. Arachne: And they .. Athene: Enough! Enough! Can’t you see what she’s doing? Or are you just too conceited to realise she’s flattering you? Zeus: You would do well to listen to this young lady, I mean spider, oh daughter of mine! She can tell the effect I have on women! She’s not flattering me! She’s telling it as it is! Arachne’s mum: Thank goodness for men and their egos! I guess that’s let my Arachne off the hook. Or the barbeque – whatever! Arachne: Phew! I sure thought I was toast, then! Spiderboy: You certainly got off light! ‘The Loves of the Gods’ indeed! To think the greatest of them all could be duped by a simple spider! Spider: Just goes to show what a superior race we are! Athene: I can’t believe my dad could be that stupid! Being flattered by a tapestry showing the gods, him included, at their worst! Arachne’s mum: Just goes to show - you, gods, have your faults, too! Maybe next time a mere mortal, like my daughter, ‘winds you up’ you’ll be a little less hasty in your actions. Zeus: She’s got a point. Time to curb that temper of yours, my dear! Remind me to book you in for some anger management classes! In the meantime, carry on spinning, you spiders of the world. But don’t go getting too full of yourselves!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

21 Quiz 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Who boasted that she was the best weaver? (Arachne) Who challenged her to a competition? (Athene) What did she do to her rival? (Turned her into a spider) What is the word meaning ‘fear of spiders’? (Arachnophobia) What was Athene’s tapestry called? (The Power of the Gods) Which gods were in it? (Zeus and Poseidon) Which goddess was in it? (Athene) Whereabouts in the picture were those who had done wrong and were being punished? (In the 4 corners) 9. What was Rhodope turned into? (A frozen mountain) 10. What was Antigone turned into? (A bird) 11. Who was Cinyras crying for? (Her daughters) 12. What was the name of Arachne’s tapestry? (The Loves of the Gods) 13. Who disguised himself as a bunch of grapes? (Bacchus) 14. What was he god of? (Wine) 15. How did Apollo disguise himself? (As a shepherd) 16. Who else was in the picture apart from Zeus? (Poseidon) 17. Name 2 disguises used by Zeus. (Bull, swan, gold coins) 18. Who was he surrounded by? (Women) 19. How did Arachne win Zeus round? (By flattery) 20. What classes did Zeus suggest to help Athene with her temper? (Classes in anger management)

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

22

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

23 Play 4 The Gorgon’s Head Brief Synopsis of Story The story of a king’s attempt to marry the woman of his choice, but against her wishes and those of her son. This king was Polydectes, king of Seriphos. He wanted to marry Danae, who lived in his palace and was the mother of Perseus, one of his soldiers. Polydectes got his own way through trickery – he pretended to want to marry Hippodameia, the daughter of a friend; and on the wedding day, accused Perseus of being too lazy to be able to afford a decent wedding present for him. Perseus responded angrily, promising Polydectes “Anything you want”, to which Polydectes replied “The Gorgon’s head”, believing this to be a death mission, so freeing himself up to marry Danae. The three sisters – Stheno, Euryate and Medusa – had been turned into Gorgons (or monsters with snakes instead of hair) as a punishment by Athene, after Medusa slept with Poseidon in her temple. Medusa was the only mortal sister, but she, like her sisters, had one fearsome weapon – just one look at her and you turned to stone! Luckily for Perseus, he had the goddess, Athene, to help him. She told him that he would have to find out where Medusa lived from The Grey Ones, called Enyo, Pemphredo and Deino – the 3 sisters of the Gorgons who lived in a nearby swamp. Athene also gave Perseus a sword to strike off Medusa’s head and a shield – in the reflection of which he could see Medusa without looking directly at her. Perseus returned to the court of Polydectes, one year later, having learnt from the fisherman Dictys (who had discovered Perseus and his mother washed up by the river many years ago) that Danae had been punished for spurning the king’s advances by being made a washerwoman. Perseus showed Polydectes the head of Medusa (that he pulled from a sack) and Polydectes promptly turned to stone. Perseus left Dictys to be king of the island, and himself became king of Mycenae, giving the Gorgon’s head to Athene, to decorate her battle armour. Speakers: Polydectes (king of Seriphos) Danae (whom Polydectes wished to be his wife) Perseus (son of Danae) Athene (goddess of wisdom and aunt of Perseus) Enyo (one of three Grey Ones) Medusa (one of three Gorgon sisters) Polydectus: Perseus: Medusa: Athene: Medusa: Danae:

Women! Nothing but trouble! I’d be careful what you say, if I were you! I think we’re a bit outnumbered here today! Correct! I, Medusa, am here today representing my two immortal Gorgon sisters, Stheno and Euryate. Shame I wasn’t! Well, don’t go expecting any sympathy from me! Messing around in my temple, with that Poseidon! You deserved what you got! Beauty is only for those who deserve it! You certainly didn’t! And you made sure no one would look twice in our direction! What! With all those snakes for hair! I’d say not!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

24 Athene: Polydectus: Enyo: Polydectes: Medusa: Polydectus: Danae: Athene: Perseus: Athene: Medusa: Perseus: Polydectes: Danae:

Perseus: Athene: Polydectus: Athene: Enyo: Perseus: Enyo: Perseus: Enyo: Perseus: Danae: Athene:

Plus that other one small detail – that once someone did look in their direction, they didn’t make the same mistake again! They couldn’t! A nasty trick. And one on which some of us came a cropper! And what about us Grey Ones – myself, Enyo, plus Pemphredo and Deino? Another 3 delightful sisters! So, that makes six altogether. Funny, but there were only ever two ugly sisters in the fairy tales I read! Have you never heard of ‘safety in numbers’? Though I guess it didn’t help me much in the end! Or me! Or those around me! Just one look at that Medusa’s head, and we all turned to stone! Served you right! You were quite happy sending my son off to face that very fate! Only he was too smart! Er, not strictly true! He did have just a little help from me! For which I was very grateful! Yes, Medusa’s head looks a lot better as part of my armour than attached to her own body! Huh! That’s a matter of opinion! Anyway, ladies. I think we must all agree I carried out a truly brave deed! I don’t remember you having much choice! Fancy arriving at a royal wedding without a decent present! And fancy offering to give him anything! Son, what were you thinking? Polydectus was no fool! He realised that by sending you off on that impossible errand, that he would then be free to pester me! Well, how was I supposed to know? I certainly wouldn’t have left you if I’d known those were his intentions! Never mind! Luckily for you I was around. Just my luck! He’d never have even found the Gorgon sisters if Athene hadn’t told him where to start looking! That’s true enough! And to think me and my sisters might have missed out on that treat! And to miss out on all the fun we had together! Huh! Speak for yourself! It nearly drove us crazy trying to find our missing eye and tooth! Well, I did try asking directions from you first. But when you refused to help, I had no choice but to steal from you! Horrible boy! No wonder we were so suspicious of strangers. It was never easy having to share one tooth and one eye between the three of us. And then you came along and made it even harder! Still, at last I then got from you what I really needed! And he doesn’t mean your eye and tooth! No, he found out that he had to go to the Land of Hyperboreans to

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

25

Perseus: Polydectus: Medusa: Athene: Medusa: Enyo: Medusa: Enyo: Athene (interrupting): Medusa: Perseus: Medusa: Athene: Perseus: Medusa: Perseus: Polydectus: Danae: Enyo: Athene: Polydectus: Perseus: Medusa: Perseus: Athene: Perseus: Medusa: Athene:

find the Gorgons. What a relief to move on from that marsh, and those 3 old hags! Just swapping one set of old hags for another, I’d say! Charmed, I’m sure! A right slithery lot! All those snakes for hair! Just as well I gave him a sword to cut through Medusa’s neck, and .. Most importantly for him, a shield! A shield? And how did that help him against my monstrous sisters? Excuse me! Is that any way to refer to your darling sisters? Perhaps you, too, should get to know how it feels to be a statue! No offence intended, fair sister! An unfortunate slip of the tongue! What I meant to say was …. Yes, yes. You Grey Ones! Always squabbling! No wonder you were always falling out with each other! Just as well you didn’t come near your other sisters! Stheno, Euryate and I had a real way of making people feel at home! A funny kind of welcome, turning people to stone! But only if they looked at us! And that was where that shield came in handy. Yes, a neat trick that, using its reflection to see Medusa without having to look at her directly. Neat trick, indeed! But the best was to come! Here we go. I could hear this coming a mile off! Served you right! Just because I spurned your attentions! How could you think I could fall for a fat old man, like you! Doesn’t beat about the bush, this one! Well, we’re nearing the end of the story, now. That’s right! She’d never have dared speak to me like that before! Well, not after you made her a lowly washerwoman! Still, you got your revenge! Turning Polydectus and his whole court into statues! Now that was a neat trick! They got what they deserved. As did our friend, Dictys, who told me, on my return, what had happened to my mum. That was a noble gesture, making him king of the island. And I became king of Mycenae, so I didn’t do so badly! And here I am! Stuck on the front of this suit of armour! The pleasure’s all mine! So it’s farewell, fair folk! And don’t go staring at any strangers!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

26

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

27

Quiz 1. Who wanted to marry Danae? (Polydectes) 2. Who was the son of Danae? (Perseus) 3. Why was Polydectes apparently so annoyed at his wedding? (Because Perseus had not brought a gift) 4. What did Polydectes trick Perseus into saying? (‘I will give you anything’) 5. What did he ask for? (Medusa’s head) 6. Why did he want Perseus out of the way? (So he could pursue his mother) 7. How many sisters did Medusa have with her? (Two) 8. What two things did they all have in common? (Hair of snakes, and if anyone looked at them, they would be turned to stone) 9. What were they called? (The Gorgons) 10. How was Medusa different from these two sisters? (She was not immortal) 11. Who turned Medusa and her sisters into monsters? (Athene) 12. Why? (Because she caught Medusa ‘messing about’ with Poseidon in her temple) 13. How many sisters did Enyo have with her? (Two) 14. What were they called? (The Grey Ones) 15. Why did Perseus have to speak to them? (They alone knew where The Gorgons lived). 15. What did Perseus take from them? (An eye and a tooth) 16. Who helped Perseus? (Athene) 17. How did Perseus avoid looking directly at Medusa? (He looked in the reflection of his shield) 18. What two things did Athene give Perseus? (Sword and shield) 19. Who told Perseus about his mother being made a washerwoman? (Dictys) 20. How did Perseus get his revenge? (Held up Gorgon’s head, so Polydectes turned to stone)

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

28

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

29 Play 5 (i) Pandora’s Box Brief synopsis of story The story of Pandora, wife of King Epimetheus, giving in to temptation. She was originally ‘made’ by Hephaestus, the blacksmith god, and given to Epimetheus by Zeus. However, the brother of Epimetheus, Prometheus, had upset Zeus on two occasions: (1) When he tricked Zeus into receiving a bag of bones, gristle, hooves and other ‘unpalatable’ beef parts, instead of the prime steak; and (2) when he had returned fire to men (when Zeus had taken it from them as punishment). Prometheus himself was punished by being chained to a mountainside and subjected to endless torture – a vulture taking his liver every night (and every time this happened his liver grew back again, ready for the next night). And Epimetheus was also punished by being given Pandora – at first sight, a perfectly beautiful woman, but sadly one who was lazy and unfaithful. She was told not to open a chest, but couldn’t resist, and so let out all the evils of the world, ensuring the future suffering of mankind. Speakers Pandora Epimetheus (brother of Prometheus) Prometheus (creator of mankind) Zeus (king of the gods) Vice Hope Epimetheus: Hope: Pandora: Epimetheus: Zeus: Epimetheus: Vice: Epimetheus: Hope: Epimetheus: Vice: Prometheus: Zeus:

And who is responsible for me feeling miserable and irritable today? This lot are all guilty, in their own different ways! Who? Me? I’ll say! I just knew you were too good to be true! How ungrateful! Typical mortal! I gave him the perfect woman and just listen to his gratitude! What? Grateful for not only ruining my life but everybody else’s too? Well, I sure was grateful. If it hadn’t been for her disobedient ways, I’d still be in that box now! And I wouldn’t be feeling so down in the dumps! I knew she was trouble from the moment I set eyes on her! Easy enough to say with hindsight! You couldn’t believe your luck at the time! Well, it’s not every day a man is presented with a wife to out-shine all others! But even as I marvelled at my good fortune, I remember feeling a little uneasy. That figures! That is, after all his brother, Prometheus, had done to upset Zeus! I think most of us would have felt just a little bit worried! OK! So I suppose I was the real villain! If it hadn’t been for my actions, none of this would have happened. You’re right there! Did you really think you could trick me, king of the gods? And as for those human beings you created – I was proved right about them! They certainly got too big for their boots – with your help!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

30 Prometheus: Zeus: Prometheus: Zeus: Hope: Zeus: Hope: Vice: Pandora: Epimetheus: Pandora: Vice: Prometheus: Pandora: Prometheus: Pandora: Prometheus: Hope: Zeus: Vice: Epimetheus: Pandora: Vice: Pandora: Epimetheus: Pandora: Zeus:

A silly error of judgement! Did you have to take it so seriously? What? Giving me a bag full of gristle, bones and hooves in place of the rich steak I was entitled to? Well you did have a choice of 2 bags. It was just unlucky you chose the wrong one! And those humans got to keep the good one! How dare you put me in such a position! I should never have had to choose in the first place! But how cruel to take fire away from humans! How were they then supposed to eat their meat? Raw? Quite so! A fitting punishment. Until Prometheus here decided to steal that fire back again! He was only looking after his own. Those humans were so cold and hungry without their fire! Sympathy and compassion! Huh! What weakness! Not like all those things I stood for! Oh please! Don’t let’s talk about that! All in good time! Though I still think my brother was punished enough for his crime, without me and the rest of mankind having to suffer too! These men! Always thinking they have to carry the weight of the world on their shoulders! You said she was ‘a bad lot’ – unfaithful, lazy, vain …but stupid too? Even I know it was Atlas, not Prometheus who was punished by having to carry the world! Whereas I had to suffer everlasting torture, by having my liver eaten by a vulture every night! Surely you could have fought it off? Not when you’re chained to the side of a mountain! But why did you say ever-lasting torture? Surely once your liver was gone, that was the end of your suffering? It would have been had it not been for the fact that every night, after the vulture left, my liver grew back inside me again – providing that vulture with a meal night after night after night! You poor thing! Save your pity! The human race was about to find out the real meaning of the word suffering! Yippee! Here comes my part! But all would have been well if it hadn’t been for … Me and my curiosity! Yes, I know I should have listened to you when you said “You must not go near that ebony box”! A stupid thing to say! Yes, you couldn’t have made it more tempting! What? To expressly forbid you to do something? Exactly! Finding out what was inside that box became totally irresistible! And look what happened!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

31 Pandora: Vice: Epimetheus: Prometheus: Zeus: Vice: Pandora: Hope: Epimetheus: Zeus:

I’ll never forget the deafening buzz of all those horrible creatures, as they sped past my head. All within seconds of my opening that box .. It was too late then! Out we poured in our hundreds, causing misery wherever we went. All that anger Pain Jealousy Spite Every kind of nastiness came pouring out of that box! How could I have known? But luckily for you I was there too. Your one flicker of light in all that darkness! Hope! Yes, where would we be without you! Thank goodness for you, dear Hope! Yes, against all the odds, Hope always shines through. Not a total disaster then …and an almost happy ending!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

32

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

33 Play 5 (ii) Pandora’s Box (short version) Speakers: Pandora Epimetheus Prometheus Zeus Vice Hope Epimetheus: Pandora: Prometheus: Zeus: Epimetheus: Pandora: Vice: Hope: Zeus: Pandora: Prometheus: Vice: Pandora: Zeus: Epimetheus: Hope: Vice: Hope: Prometheus: Pandora: Prometheus: Vice: Hope: Prometheus: Pandora: Zeus: Vice: Zeus: Hope: Zeus: Pandora: Hope: Epimetheus: Prometheus: Pandora: Epimetheus:

Why did you have to open that box? I wouldn’t have if you hadn’t told me not to! Women! Always twisting things! Quite! They always make trouble! And then we have to listen to their excuses! But I couldn’t help myself! I just had to see what was inside that box! And that was me! Yes, you and all those other nasty things Like – hate And envy And greed And jealousy And laziness Funny you should think of that one! You were certainly lazy! But she was so beautiful! I bet you couldn’t believe your luck when Zeus gave her to you! I would have smelt a rat! Yes. It was a little strange. I should have warned my brother. But how could you have? You were chained to the side of a mountain! Being eaten alive every night! Nasty things, those vultures! And this one was very well fed! A new liver every night! There was no end to my torture! What a punishment! Well, Prometheus should not have helped those humans Not just once, but twice! Never play tricks on the gods! But why punish Epimetheus as well? And why not? He didn’t have to take Pandora! Not take me?! She was the most beautiful woman on earth! Still, I soon regretted it. Along with the rest of the human race! Oh please! I’ve said I was sorry! It was just a silly mistake! Silly mistake?! So what part of ‘Do not open that box’ did you not understand? Vice: Foolish woman! Zeus: Just couldn’t stop herself! Vice: And out I came! With all my horrid buddies! Hope: Lucky I was there! Pandora: Indeed! Our one little hope! Epimetheus: Thank goodness for hope!

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

34

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©

35 Quiz 1. 2. 3. 4.

Who gave Pandora as a gift to Epimetheus? (Zeus) What was the brother of Epimetheus called? (Prometheus) How many bags of animal parts were offered to Zeus? (Two) What was in the bag Zeus chose? (The unappetizing parts e.g. gristle, bone, hooves) 5. Who got the ‘good’ bits, like steak? (Humans) 6. How did Zeus punish them? (By taking away their fire) 7. How did humans then feel, as a result of this action? (Cold and hungry) 8. How would they now have to eat their meat? (Raw) 9. Who felt sorry for them? (Hope) 10. Who didn’t feel any sympathy for them? (Vice) 11. Who, in another myth, was punished by having to ‘carry the weight of the world on his shoulders’? (Atlas) 12. What kind of bird tortured Prometheus, as his punishment? (Vulture) 13. How often did the vulture visit Prometheus? (Every night) 14. Why was Prometheus unable to run away? (He was chained to the mountainside) 15. Why was his torture everlasting? (His liver re-grew every night, so the vulture came back every following night) 16. What kind of box was Pandora told not to open? (Ebony) 17. What did Pandora fail to overcome? (Her own curiosity) 18. Name 4 unpleasant ‘things’ that came out of the box. (Anger, pain, jealousy and spite) 19. Name 4 others that you can think of. (Envy, deceit, meanness, arrogance, sadness) 20. Who represented a ‘flicker of light’? (Hope)

Sue Russell Copyright 2007©