Adult Bible Fellowship Leadership Manual. January, 2013

Adult Bible Fellowship Leadership Manual January, 2013 1 Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS .........................................................
Author: Rachel Allen
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Adult Bible Fellowship Leadership Manual January, 2013

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Table of Contents TABLE OF CONTENTS ..............................................................................................................................2 PREFACE ......................................................................................................................................................3 INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................................................................4 THE PURPOSE OF BIBLE FELLOWSHIP ..........................................................................................................4 TEACHING EFFECTIVELY ......................................................................................................................6 GOAL: LIFE TRANSFORMATION ..................................................................................................................6 LESSON PREPARATION ................................................................................................................................8 LESSON DELIVERY .................................................................................................................................... 10 CLASS ORGANIZATION AND ROLES ................................................................................................. 12 MOTIVATION ............................................................................................................................................. 12 CLASS ORGANIZATION .............................................................................................................................. 12 LEADERSHIP REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................................................... 13 TEACHER ................................................................................................................................................... 13 DIRECTOR ................................................................................................................................................. 14 SECRETARY ............................................................................................................................................... 14 CARE GROUP LEADER ............................................................................................................................... 15 CARE GROUP COORDINATOR .................................................................................................................... 15 OUTREACH LEADER .................................................................................................................................. 16 CLASS ORGANIZATION CHART .................................................................................................................. 16 CONDUCTING A CLASS ......................................................................................................................... 17 BEFORE CLASS BEGINS .............................................................................................................................. 17 DURING CLASS .......................................................................................................................................... 18 AFTER CLASS ............................................................................................................................................ 19 APPENDIX 1 ............................................................................................................................................... 20

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Preface First Redeemer Church thanks you for your willingness to serve our Lord through our Adult Bible Fellowship Ministry. Adult education and discipleship continues to be an exciting area of growth fueled, in large part, by the commitment and servant-mindedness of our Bible Fellowship teachers and leadership. Our prayer is that God will continue to use our Bible Fellowship leadership in ways that far exceed our expectations. This manual was developed as a guide to those serving in the Bible Fellowship ministry. Its purpose is to: 1. Describe Bible Fellowship’s purpose and importance. 2. Suggest ways to teach God’s Word to transform lives. 3. Explain the organizational structure of a Bible Fellowship class and the roles of each class leader. 4. Suggest how a Bible Fellowship class can be conducted effectively. We look forward to serving with you in this exciting ministry. If we can be of any assistance, please do not hesitate to contact us at 678-513-9400.

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Introduction Many years ago, there was a TV “infomercial” for a gadget guaranteed to help anyone lose weight. The remarkable thing about this device was that no exercise or diet was needed - the only required “investment” was $49.99 to purchase this scientific breakthrough. However, a few short months later, this same company was being sued and had filed for bankruptcy. The lesson learned was, ineffective products or ideas will not stand the test of time and will eventually fail. Sunday School/Bible Fellowship ministries, however, have successfully supported churches’ efforts to fulfill our Lord’s Great Commission for over 200 years. This track record is a key indicator that Bible Fellowship is a viable and effective way to meet the ministry needs of people throughout the world. While this ministry has evolved and adapted to ever-changing cultures and needs, the basic notion of small-group Bible Fellowship continues to be a successful element of many churches’ teaching, discipleship and outreach efforts.

The Purpose of Bible Fellowship – R.I.T.E. First Redeemer’s Adult Bible Fellowship Ministry plays a vitally important role in achieving our church’s Mission by providing: 1. An environment for intimate fellowship and support. RELATIONSHIPS God is concerned that no individual is overlooked within a larger group Exodus 18:14-23 (NIV) [14] When his father-in-law saw all that Moses was doing for the people, he said, "What is this you are doing for the people? Why do you alone sit as judge, while all these people stand around you from morning till evening?" [15] Moses answered him, "Because the people come to me to seek God's will. [16] Whenever they have a dispute, it is brought to me, and I decide between the parties and inform them of God's decrees and laws." [17] Moses' father-in-law replied, "What you are doing is not good. [18] You and these people who come to you will only wear yourselves out. The work is too heavy for you; you cannot handle it alone. [19] Listen now to me and I will give you some advice, and may God be with you. You must be the people's representative before God and bring their disputes to him. [20] Teach them the decrees and laws, and show them the way to live and the duties they are to perform. [21] But select capable men from all the people--men who fear God, trustworthy men who hate dishonest gain--and appoint them as officials over thousands, hundreds, fifties and tens. [22] Have them serve as judges for the people at all times, but have them bring every difficult case to you; the simple cases they can decide themselves. That will make your load lighter, because they will share it with you. [23] If you do this and God so commands, you will be able to stand the strain, and all these people will go home satisfied."

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2. Opportunities for ministry.

INVOLVEMENT

Every member of First Redeemer Church is needed to achieve our full potential as a body of Christ 1 Cor. 12:12 & 18(NIV) The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; and though all its parts are many, they form one body. So it is with Christ. But in fact God has arranged the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be.

3. A means of spiritual transformation and growth for members of our fellowship through the teaching of God’s Word. TEACHING Spiritual growth does not happen apart from the study of God’s Word. 2 Tim. 3:16 (NIV) All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, Isaiah 55:11 (NIV) so is my word that goes out from my mouth: It will not return to me empty, but will accomplish what I desire and achieve the purpose for which I sent it.

4. An outreach mechanism to those who are without Christ or a church home. EVANGELISM Our primary focus is reaching those who need Christ. Matthew 28:19-20 (NIV)Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, [20] and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age."

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Teaching Effectively Goal: Life Transformation Reflect for a moment on Bible Fellowship/Sunday School lessons you’ve heard in your past. Can you remember the bad ones? If you were to list the characteristics of the “bad” lessons, you’d probably come up with things like: -

The teacher wasn’t prepared. I didn’t learn anything I didn’t already know. The teacher was boring. There was no connection between what the teacher said and my situations of life. Our discussion ran around in circles. . . . .and there are probably many more.

Here are the stories of two Bible Fellowship classes. In one class, the people are friendly and the fellowship is enjoyable, but the teacher always shares at the beginning of the lesson, “I apologize in advance for not being better prepared, but I had very little time to study this past week.” Then he proceeds to demonstrate how ill-prepared he really is! To a class participant, this says two things: 1. Bible Fellowship is not important to this teacher. We understand that those things that are important to us get priority in our lives. A truth always to remember is we do what we want to do, and conversely, we don’t do what we don’t want to do. 2. This teacher does not take seriously the spiritual growth of the class members. In addition to the morning worship service, the class members depend on that hour of Bible Study for spiritual guidance and direction. This teacher allows the class to leave still hungry for what God has to say to them. The other Bible Fellowship class is led by a very different kind of teacher. It is always evident that he has studied the lesson for several hours before coming to class. And, he demonstrates a love for the Bible that is contagious. However, often the class members leave class feeling frustrated and confused. While the teacher may have presented the Bible facts, he failed to make the Bible truth practically relevant to life. The goal of a good lesson is to facilitate the spiritual growth of those in your class. So how do we develop and teach “good” lessons? While God equips each teacher differently with their own style, there are a few common traits of lessons that effectively transform life. A good lesson reveals insightful Biblical truth. This requires study. During the week, teachers must commit themselves to searching scripture with the guidance of the Holy 6

Spirit. There is nothing more wonderful than to have the Holy Spirit reveal biblical truth as you study God’s Word. A good lesson is designed to engage and involve participants. It has been said that “people learn when they participate”. Therefore, lessons that encourage class interaction are often most effective. A good lesson applies biblical truths to life. Life transformation can take place when people connect Biblical facts and truths to their own lives. Helping class participants see how biblical principles and truths apply to their daily challenges facilitates spiritual growth and transformation. One way to think about “teaching to transform” is to guide members of your class through what Educational Psychologists call the “Six Levels of Learning”i : 1. Knowledge – the ability to recall learned material. At this level, your students recall or recognize information, ideas and principles in a form very similar to that which was taught. They can answer questions such as “What happened when . . . ?” or “List three characteristics of . . .” 2. Comprehension – the ability to grasp the meaning of material. At this level, your students begin to understand information to the degree that they can restate it in their own words. They can answer questions such as “What does this mean?” or “Explain the reason . . .” 3. Application – the ability to relate the lesson to a new situation. At this level, your students can take data and principles learned and resolve problems with minimal guidance. They can answer questions such as “What might happen if . . . ?” or “What would they do if . . . ?” 4. Analysis – the ability to break down a larger problem or idea into parts. At this level, learners are thinking logically and are able to reason both inductively and deductively. They can answer questions or requests such as “What caused him to take that action?” or “Distinguish between the facts and opinions in her presentation.” 5. Synthesis – the ability to put parts together to create a new form or function. At this level, your students can translate ideas into a new application much as an inventor applies scientific principles to develop a new product. They can answer questions such as “How could you determine . . . ?” or “What would you do if . . .?” 6. Evaluation – the ability to determine value in light of a standard or law. At this level, your students begin to distinguish between good, better and best. They can answer questions such as “Which option will prove most productive in this situation?” or “Why would you choose ______ over ______?”

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Lesson Preparation So how does one effectively prepare a lesson that will engage/involve students, reveal biblical truth and illustrate relevant life application? While there are many ways to do this, a few suggestions are listed below. Start preparing early. Unfortunately, hectic personal schedules often postpone lesson preparation until the last possible moment. However, reviewing and studying material as early as possible allows more time to research, absorb and reflect on the subject to be presented. Pray daily. Our best efforts will be fruitless without the working of the Holy Spirit in us and in the lives of those who will be in our classes. Dr. E. Towns recommends daily prayer for: 1. The Holy Spirit to make you teachable as you study (Psalms 119:18, “Open my eyes that I may see wondrous things from your law.” 2. The teaching ministry of the Holy Spirit in your class. 3. Guidance in lesson preparation. 4. Those in your class – that they might be convicted of sin, challenged in their walk and encouraged by God’s Word. 5. For students’ spiritual growth. Review needs. Spend time each week reflecting on the known needs of the students in your class. Your genuine concern for the specific needs of your class members (or lack thereof) will be evident to your class as you teach your lesson. As teachers, we should always strive to be “in-tune” with our class members’ lives. Use approved curriculum. The use of any Bible Fellowship curriculum other than the one provided by the education office needs prior approval from the Education Minister. Develop a lesson outline. Even the most insightful, well-studied truths will be ineffective if not communicated in an orderly, understandable way. Learners will grasp the lifetransforming elements of a lesson that is well-organized. Following are a couple of suggestions. 1. First, be sure you understand and communicate the central truth described in the lesson. Normally, this will be a single sentence that summarizes the “heart” of the lesson. Unless this central truth is clearly established and communicated, it’s possible (and even probable) that members of your class may miss the “point” of the lesson and how it is applied to their own life. 2. After establishing the central truth of the lesson, it is often effective to organize the elements of the lesson into 3 to 5 “take-away” points. This gives learners an organized “list” of truths – without this, the lesson may seem to “ramble” without 8

organization or cohesiveness. The following techniques have been used while developing these “take-away” points: o Acrostics – Key Points are organized in a way that the first letter of each point spells a word (helps learners recall the lesson easily). When using this technique, however, be careful that key truths do not become awkward simply for the purposes of creating an easily-recalled lesson. o Alliteration – Key Points begin with the same letter (also helps learners recall the lesson easily). As with the use of acrostics, care should be taken when using this technique that key truths do not become awkward. o Questions and Answers – The lesson is organized in such a way where questions are posed and answered as a way of communicating key truths. This technique can be used to facilitate class participation. o Simple statements of truth – Key truths are simply stated and elaborated upon. o Progressive arguments toward a hypothesis – Key truths build on one-another until the central truth is fully developed at the end of the lesson. There are many resources available to assist the development of a lesson outline. For example, the Lifeway quarterly teacher’s manuals (provided to each teacher at the beginning of each quarter) offer a suggested outline. Also, study Bibles and commentaries are sometimes useful while organizing biblical truths into an easily understood, well-structured lesson. Illustrate key truths with stories. Relevant, appropriate story-telling is an extremely effective way to communicate truths to your class. Stories serve two key purposes: 1. They help hold the class’s attention – people love to hear a good story. When you begin to tell a story, you’ll notice how class participants’ attention level changes. 2. They can help make biblical truths pragmatic and relevant. Nothing helps illustrate the application of a biblical truth to life better than a fictional or real example. While preparing a lesson, applicable stories should be planned to help illustrate major points. These stories can be of personal accounts or from a number of books which provide stories/illustrations by topic (“Let Me Illustrate” by D. B. Barnhouse and “1000 Illustrations for Preaching and Teaching” by G. C. Jones are a couple of examples). Plan to stimulate discussion with open-ended questions. Most learners will enjoy a class where they are given the opportunity to participate and contribute to the presentation of biblical truth. Speaking to the importance of class participation, Dr. Towns has said, “Your students have not learned the lessons you present until they hear, understand and express them in their own language.” When preparing a lesson, the development of questions that require more than a “yes/no” answer can help to engage students in the Bible Fellowship and facilitate learning.

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Develop a lesson introduction and conclusion last. It is often helpful to develop a lesson introduction and conclusion after the central truth, outline, illustrations and questions have been developed. It is important that both the introduction and conclusion offer ways that the lesson can be applied to everyday life.

Lesson Delivery While the suggestions below are offered as “guiding principles” for delivering a lesson, they are not meant to take away from the elements of informality and “fun” that are important elements to the kind of intimate classes we should build. Having said this, the following are suggestions for delivering an organized lesson: Introduction. To create interest in the lesson, it is often helpful to connect the lesson’s central truth with everyday problems, experiences and challenges. Sometimes, it is extremely effective for the teacher to be most transparent in the introduction and share how the lesson that is about to be presented has challenged or uplifted themselves with a specific example. Also during the introduction, be sure to set the appropriate scriptural context for the Bible lesson. This often helps learners better understand the meaning of the lesson. Lesson. Here are a few suggestions for the delivery of the lesson: 1. When presenting the key truths of your outline, it is a good idea to be sure they are available visually for the class (whether on a handout, board or transparency). 2. It is important to control and guide discussion to insure it stays on-track. Too much uncontrolled discussion can confuse learners. Here are a few suggestions: o Attempt to summarize how comments made by class participants relate to the key truth being presented. This helps return the class to the key theme, especially when “stray comments” are made. o Don’t be afraid to “move on for sake of time.” o Know where you’re going . . . otherwise you won’t get there. 3. Be very careful when answering questions. Never be afraid to say, “I don’t know”. . . it is better to leave a question unanswered than to answer it incorrectly. Also, be aware of those questions that might be of malicious intent – avoid addressing questions that seem to be “setting you up.”

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4. Understand the “Do’s and Don’ts”. Don’t: o Teach for more than 25-30 minutes (or past the scheduled end time). o Read lesson notes. o Chew gum or candy while speaking. o Refer to someone as an example without their permission. o Initiate or condone negative comments about any church or its members. o Call on someone to pray, read or answer a question without prior notification. Do: o Thank members for their insightful comments/contributions to the lesson. o Ask for volunteers to read portions of the lesson, share experiences/comments, etc. o Use humor to create a relaxed learning atmosphere. o Have fun with the class. Conclusion. Class participants are most likely to remember your closing comments. Therefore, it’s important to make use of these final comments to convey truths and application succinctly and clearly. When closing the lesson, it is helpful to: 1. Briefly summarize the lesson with an emphasis on the central truth 2. Challenge the class in a real, practical way – connect the central truth to “real life”. 3. Anticipate questions/responses from class members and be ready to answer them. 4. Offer to lead people to Christ. 5. End on-time.

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Class Organization and Roles Motivation While there may be a few exceptions, most effective, growing Bible Fellowship classes are very well organized with a leadership “team” as opposed to a single leader. Why is it important to establish a Bible Fellowship leadership organization with varying roles? Here are a few reasons: A class organization with varying roles: 1. Provides ministry opportunities for members of the class. The members of your class are all equipped with spiritual gifts that are to be employed in the local church. (Romans 12:4-6). 2. Facilitates operational efficiency through delegation. Distributed responsibilities allow for more focused attention to each of the vital elements of Bible Fellowship ministry. 3. Facilitates the class multiplication process. “Teacher-centric” classes are difficult to multiply.

Class Organization A typical Bible Fellowship Class leadership team will be comprised of: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

A teacher A co-teacher A class director A class secretary A Care Group Coordinator Care Group Leaders Outreach leaders

At the discretion of the teacher and director, other roles may be added (for example, a prayer coordinator, activities chairperson or communications coordinator). Depending on the size of the class, 1 person may serve multiple roles. It’s sometimes a good idea to establish a “term” for serving in an office (i.e. reassign officers each year). This helps to engage a greater number of people in ministry while providing “breaks” for those in service. It is important that this group of class leaders function as a team with regularly-scheduled leadership meetings. As described later, the teacher is responsible for leading this team to build an effective class ministry. 12

Leadership Requirements In light of the importance of their ministry and their potential impact on the lives of those in our fellowship, Bible Fellowship Leaders are chosen very carefully with the following requirements in mind: 1. They must agree to First Redeemer’s Bible Fellowship Worker’s Covenant (attached in Appendix 1). 2. They must be a member of First Redeemer Church. 3. They must live a separated life. 4. They must honor the Lord by obediently giving at least 10% of their income to the local church. 5. They must be faithful in their attendance in the Lord’s house. 6. They must be doctrinally sound, in agreement with our Articles of Faith. 7. They must support the efforts of the pastoral staff to fulfill our church’s mission statement. 8. They must have a servant’s spirit, exemplifying Christian love and selflessness.

Teacher The role of a Bible Fellowship teacher is critically important to the growth and viability of our fellowship and the achievement of our church mission. Not only does the teacher study and teach God’s Word, but he/she is also responsible for overseeing the ministry of the smallest ministry group in our fellowship – the Bible Fellowship class. Because teachers are on the “front line” of our church’s ministry, they are uniquely positioned to either positively or negatively color the opinions/impressions of those attending class (both members and non-members) about our church and its beliefs. This is a responsibility that should be taken very seriously. The responsibilities of a Bible Fellowship teacher include: 1. Studying and prayerfully preparing to teach God’s Word each week as outlined in curriculum approved by staff leadership. 2. Staffing and organizing the class according to the established guidelines. 3. Leading the class to minister to needs of class members or prospects. 4. Cooperating with the efforts of the total Bible Fellowship Ministry under the leadership of the Pastor to reach more people and make the most effective use of space and materials. 5. Preparing members of Bible Fellowship classes to “birth” new classes in accordance with our efforts to reach more people through the Adult Education Ministry. 6. Engaging class members in ministry. 7. Leading the class leadership team via regularly scheduled meetings and discipling/training potential leaders. 13

8. Attending Bible Fellowship Leadership and Teacher meetings. 9. Faithfully attending class. When it is necessary for the teacher to be away, the teacher is responsible for securing a qualified replacement and notifying the Adult Education Pastor in advance. 10. Regularly attending church worship service.

Director The Class Director’s role is very important to the effective use of class-time and the preparation of class members for learning and worship. Because the Director is often the first to address a Bible Fellowship class, his/her demeanor and attitude does much to influence the attitudes of those in the class. A positive, upbeat and interactive beginning to class time often results in a positive, upbeat and interactive lesson. The responsibilities of a Bible Fellowship director include: 1. Opening Bible Fellowship class-time with a welcoming, up-beat demeanor. 2. Insuring class-time is managed effectively and in an organized way. 3. Insuring information and events are conveyed to the class (i.e. facilitating class announcements). 4. Formally recognizing and welcoming those visiting the class. 5. Overseeing the recruitment, installation and training of class officers. 6. Organizing and planning class social activities. 7. Participating in class leadership meetings as scheduled by the teacher. 8. Regularly attending Bible Fellowship class. 9. Regularly attending church worship service.

Secretary The class secretary cares for all administrative activities in the class. Because this includes the maintenance of church records, it is very important that this function be performed with accuracy and consistency. The responsibilities of a class secretary include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Compiling the class attendance and contacts reports. Insuring guest registration forms are completed by all class visitors. Providing the teacher, co-teacher and outreach leaders visitor contact information. Providing teacher, co-teacher and care group leaders copies of attendance records. Insuring all records are returned to the records box and that records box is returned to the education desk. 6. Coordinating any refreshments or snacks for the class. 7. Providing name tags for members and guests.

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8. Insuring praises and prayer requests are documented and made available to the class before dismissal. 9. Participating in class leadership meeting as scheduled by the teacher. 10. Regularly attending Bible Fellowship class. 11. Regularly attending church worship service.

Care Group Leader A care group leader is responsible for interacting regularly with and building close relationships with a group of class members (normally made up of 4-6 couples or 8-10 people). As the leader of the smallest ministry group in the church, they are intimately familiar with the needs, challenges and events in the lives of those in their group. They also serve as a primary channel of communication to the remainder of the class when specific ministry opportunities arise within the class. The responsibilities of a care group leader include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

Maintaining regular, weekly contact with members of their care group. Encouraging regular attendance of those in their care group. Building close relationships with those in their care group. Organizing care group activities. Communicating needs of those in their care group (as appropriate) to the other care group leaders and class leadership. Organizing ministry responses to needs of those in their care group (as appropriate). Participating in class leadership meeting as scheduled by the teacher. Regularly attending Bible Fellowship class. Regularly attending church worship service.

Care Group Coordinator Each class should have a care group coordinator whose role is to oversee and maintain the care group ministry. The responsibilities of a care group coordinator include: 1. Working with the teacher to identify, recruit and train care group leadership. 2. Maintaining care group membership lists. This includes the addition of new members to existing care groups and the creation of new care groups as class growth requires. 3. Participating in class leadership meeting as scheduled by the teacher. 4. Regularly attending Bible Fellowship class. 5. Regularly attending church worship service.

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Outreach Leader The class outreach leaders play a key role in reaching out to prospective church and class members. As one of the first contacts a visitor has with our church and Bible Fellowship ministry, these leaders are positioned to make the critical “first impression” on prospective church members. Hence, they must be well-trained, consistent and peoplecentered. The responsibilities of an outreach leader include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Implementing the church outreach plan within the Bible Fellowship class. Developing relationships with those visiting their Bible Fellowship class. Assisting the teacher to enlist and train outreach leaders. Conducting follow-up communications with visitors. Participating in scheduled, church-wide outreach programs. Participating in class leadership meeting as scheduled by the teacher. Regularly attending Bible Fellowship class. Regularly attending church worship service.

Class Organization Chart

Teacher Co-Teacher Class Director

Class Secretary

Care Group Coordinator

Outreach Leaders

Care Group Leader

Care Group Leader

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Conducting a Class While ministry in an effective Bible Fellowship class takes place 7 days a week, the 4560 minute class session is a vitally important time as class members assemble for prayer, study and fellowship. Every effort should be made to organize this time to maximize its effectiveness. Remember what the Bible says about our Lord in 1 Corinthians 14:33, “For God is not the author of confusion, but of peace, as in all churches of the saints.” To help make efficient use of this valuable Bible Fellowship class time, the following suggestions may help organize your class’s efforts to minister effectively.

Before Class begins In order for all suggested pre-class activities to be completed, class leaders should arrive at least 10-15 minutes before class members arrive. Teacher/Co-teacher. Before class, the teacher/co-teacher should insure that the classroom provides a comfortable, welcoming atmosphere for fellowship and learning. A few suggestions are: 1. The room should be neat and orderly. Clutter can be distracting and leave a bad first impression for guests. 2. The room temperature should be comfortable. Remember that rooms warmup when they are filled with people. Warm rooms make it difficult for the teacher to maintain the attention of those in the class. 3. If possible, chairs should be arranged so that: a. The door is at the rear of the class, allowing late-comers to join the class without interrupting or feeling awkward. b. They compliment the teacher’s communication style. Chairs aligned in rows foster lecture-style teaching while chairs aligned in a circle encourage discussion and interaction. The teacher should also insure that the leaders who play a part in the class (i.e. the director and secretary) are present and ready to perform their duties. If a leader is absent, arrangements should be made before class to cover their responsibilities. Director. Before class, the director prepares for the opening of class time. This might include: 1. Insuring that volunteers are identified to open/close class time in prayer (if necessary). Neither the director nor any other leader should call on someone to pray without making prior arrangements privately.

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2. Insuring that all announcements/announcers are ready. A well-prepared announcement time is not only an efficient use of time, but also sets a positive tone for the remainder of the class time. 3. Arranging for background music while class members arrive. Secretary. Prior to the beginning of class, the secretary may be responsible for 1. Insuring that refreshments are available. Normally, the secretary maintains and manages a rotating refreshment schedule and insures that the volunteer responsible for refreshments is reminded of their assigned day. 2. Identifying and welcoming visitors to the class upon their arrival. 3. Providing name tags for members and visitors. 4. Insuring that all visitors receive and complete a visitor registration card. 5. Preparing the attendance reports (as members arrive). Outreach & Care Group Leaders. These leaders will be the first point of contact for visitors. They should greet visitors at the door and make them feel “at home” by introducing them to other class members. They should also insure the director has the name of each guest for recognition at the beginning of class.

During Class Director. The director should begin class on-time, regardless of the number in attendance, and lead the opening portion of the class; the opening should not last more than 15-20 minutes and may include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Recognizing all visitors and/or having them introduce themselves. Making the announcements from the Bible Fellowship Memo Coordinating other announcements. Insuring contacts are counted and provided to the class secretary. Facilitating praise/prayer request time. Opening the class in prayer (or having previously arranged volunteer lead).

Because the director is the first to speak, it is important for him/her to be up-beat, lively and positive. The director’s demeanor will do much to set the tone for the remainder of the class period and the participant’s attitude. Also, especially in larger groups, the director will need move through opening remarks efficiently, not allowing the class to become “bogged-down” before the lesson is presented. Secretary. During announcement time, the secretary should record the number of contacts on the class roll. Also, the secretary should record (or have someone record) the praises and prayer requests and insure this is available in hard-copy for the class before the end of the session.

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Teacher/Co-teacher. After the director opens the class in prayer, the teacher/co-teacher presents the lesson. The lesson should last for 25-30 minutes and should never run past the scheduled class end-time.

After Class Teacher/Co-teacher/Outreach leaders/Care Group leaders/Director. After dismissal, the class leaders should insure that everyone is greeted and thanked for attending – especially guests. Secretary. The secretary is responsible for insuring all paperwork is cared for. This includes the following: -

-

The White and Yellow copies of the attendance report, completed visitors cards and the contact report should be returned to the record box. The Pink copy of the attendance report (including the names, addresses and phone numbers of guests) should be provided to the teacher or outreach leader. The record box should be returned to the education desk.

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APPENDIX 1 Bible Fellowship Worker’s Covenant

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FIRST REDEEMER CHURCH BIBLE FELLOWSHIP WORKER’S COVENANT Having been saved by the grace of God through Jesus Christ our Savior, and having been led by the Spirit of God to accept a place of service in the Sunday School of First Redeemer Church; And believing that the Bible, the divinely inspired Word of God, is a lamp unto our feet, a light unto our path, and is profitable for doctrine, reproof, correction, and instruction in righteousness; We do solemnly and joyfully covenant together to love one another and strengthen each other by prayerfully endeavoring to: 1.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Faithfully attend the Sunday sessions each week arriving 15 minutes early unless prevented by illness or emergency. In our absence, we will be certain to arrange a substitute approved by the education minister; Faithfully prepare for Sundays through prayer and Bible Fellowship well in advance each week; Faithfully contact members and prospects and to regularly pray for and contact those inactive and absentee; Faithfully participate in worker’s planning meetings; Faithfully learn better ways to reach, teach, and minister by participating in leadership training opportunities and through personal study; Faithfully attend the Worship Services of our church; Faithfully support our total church program through prayer, example, and conversation; Faithfully give to our church through tithes and offerings; Faithfully live a consecrated Christian life during the week consistent with our Covenant of Membership and the Scriptures we teach; And see Christ glorified, the church edified, and people saved in every way possible.

Signed: ________________________________

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Date: _________________

Endnotes

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Towns, Elmer, What Every Sunday School Teacher Should Know. p. 35. Ventura, California: Gospel Light, 2001.

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