Address: Left Leg. pain

Client Name: South West Regional   Wound Care Toolkit:  Interdisciplinary Lower Leg  Assessment Form  Address: Assessment Date: NOTE‐ This can be u...
Author: Penelope Bates
15 downloads 3 Views 247KB Size
Client Name:

South West Regional   Wound Care Toolkit:  Interdisciplinary Lower Leg  Assessment Form 

Address:

Assessment Date: NOTE‐ This can be used as an electronic Document,  Instructions for use: Competent/ Proficient/ Expert level  made into an Interactive PDF or used as a paper  HCP to complete if lower leg ulcer present or risk of ulcer is  document, in which case it would need to have Client  name and signatures on each page.  suspected.  The red recommendations at the end of each section are ACTION indicators.

a.  ULCER OR PRE‐ULCEROUS CONDITIONS  Right Leg 

Left Leg

  History of previous ulcer?   Years:     Date of onset of current ulcer:    Multiple wounds.    Locations:   

     

History of previous ulcer?  Years:   Date of onset of current ulcer:  Multiple wounds.   Locations: 

  Skin stretched with imminent breakdown.    Serous weeping from leg without signs of ulceration.   Sub‐keratotic hemorrhage under callus.    Probes to bone  Comments:     

Skin stretched with imminent breakdown. Serous weeping from leg without signs of ulceration. 

Sub‐keratotic hemorrhage under callus.   Probes to bone Comments: 

ACTION: 

  Consider presence of osteomyelitis if probes to bone in DFU (70‐90%), pressure ulcer or venous ulcer  b.  LEG PAIN (SEE SECTION d. FOR SYMPTOMS OF NEUROPATHY)  Right Leg 

 Left Leg  

Other Symptoms 

 

Venous Symptoms 

Arterial Symptoms 

deep bone pain   ( Poss.  osteomyelitis)  pain in ulcer  (Poss. Infection) 

  pain with deep  palpation 

  knife‐like 

  relieved with  elevation 

known  arthritis  pain 

  Ache 

 

Comments: 

 

 

Other Symptoms 

Venous Symptoms 

Arterial Symptoms 

pain with deep  palpation 

knife‐like 

  intermittent  claudication 

deep bone pain   ( Poss.  osteomyelitis)  pain in ulcer  (Poss. Infection) 

relieved with  elevation 

intermittent  claudication 

  increased pain  with elevation 

known  arthritis  pain 

ache 

increased pain  with elevation 

 

pain at night 

  pain at night 

 

 

 

 

Comments: 

 See Section B.5 Wound Pain Assessment Tools for pain >4/10   Refer to Pain Specialist or PT to address pain control.  c. FOOT DEFORMITIES, NAILS AND FOOTWEAR  ACTION: 

Right Foot   Foot Deformities:   hammer toes           claw toes   dropped MTH             hallux valgus            dropped arch       calluses/corns  fixed ankle joint        hallux rigidus           fissures  other:    Nails:   thick      yellow     brittle  fungus     abnormal    ingrown: 

Left Foot

hammer toes         hallux valgus          fixed ankle joint       other:    thick    ingrown:

yellow   

claw toes  dropped MTH         dropped arch       calluses/corns hallux rigidus          fissures  

brittle 

fungus   

SWRWC Toolkit_B.2.2_Interdis. Lower Leg Assess. Tool_Jan 16 2011 Appropriate credit or citation must appear on all copied materials. 

abnormal

1

Footwear:   orthotics not being worn at all times, indoor or out       presence of pressure areas        Location:   

d. TEST FOR NEUROPATHY    Applicable   

 inappropriate footwear 

 Not Applicable

Right Foot  

Left  Foot 

Sensation Score:   

/10 

Sensation Score:  

/10

10‐ point Monofilament Neuropathic Assessment  ‐    Indicate with a + or ‐ the  presence or absence  of  sensation             

 

(-) sensation  absent 

(+) sensation  present

 

                                                   Dorsum Right Foot

Dorsum Left                                            Foot

   

  Sensory:   

  Plantar Foot Right Left Sensory:  

Autonomic:   

burning  numbness  dry    

tingling 

Motor: 

fissures  soft tissue distribution altered 

Autonomic:  

burning  numbness  dry   

Motor:

soft tissue distribution altered

crawling  cracking 

tingling

crawling

cracking

fissures

Sensory &/or  charcot     acute charcot Sensory &/or  charcot     acute charcot Autonomic   Autonomic   e. DIABETIC FOOT RISK CLASSIFICATION SYSTEM: The International Working Group Original and Modified Criteria 2010   Applicable     Not Applicable  Right Foot   Left Foot  0   1 Loss of   0   1 Loss of   2b  2b  2a Loss of   2a Loss of  Normal‐ no  protective  Normal‐ no  protective  Peripheral  Peripheral  protective  protective  neuropathy   sensation   neuropathy   sensation   sensation and  arterial  sensation and  arterial disease  disease  deformity  deformity    3a Previous history of DFU    3b Previous history of   3a Previous history of DFU    3b Previous history of      amputation  amputation  Comments:    Comments:  f. The University of Texas Staging System for Diabetic Foot Ulcers (only for clients with Diabetic Foot Ulcer)    Applicable     Not Applicable  Stage  Grade 0  Grade I Grade II  

Grade III



Pre‐ or post‐ulcerative lesion  completely epithelialized   Infection 

Superficial ulcer, not involving  tendon capsule or bone   Infection 

Ulcer penetrating to tendon or  capsule   Infection 

Ulcer penetrating to  bone or joint   Infection 



 Ischemia 

 Ischemia 

 Ischemia 

 Ischemia 



Infection & Ischemia 

Infection & Ischemia 

Infection & Ischemia 

Infection & Ischemia 



Score:  Grade______ Stage_____  SWRWC Toolkit_B.2.2_Interdis. Lower Leg Assess. Tool_Jan 16 2011 Appropriate credit or citation must appear on all copied materials. 

2

Actions:   Refer to a foot specialist (chiropodist, podiatrist, pedorthist etc.) for those with a DFU present and/or loss of protective  sensation for pressure redistribution devices  Refer to OT if underlying pressure and/or surface concerns.  Consider referral to a PT or other qualified health care professional for adjunctive therapy if healing has not       occurred at the expected rate in spite of best practices x 4 weeks (see Section 13 for details).  Consider biologically active agents if healing has not occurred at the expected rate in spite of best practices x 4 weeks (see  Section 13 for details).  g. EDEMA (IF PRESENT)   Right Leg    Date of  onset:  Asymmetrical with contra‐lateral limb  Location:  toes     foot      B/K   A/K       sacral     ascites Description: Press finger into edema x 10 –15 seconds.  Pitting:  1+ = 0 ‐ ¼”       2+ = ¼” – ½”      3+ = ½ ‐ 1”      4+ = takes several minutes to rebound      non‐pitting  brawny induration    Measurements:   

Left Leg  Date of onset:

Midfoot=  Heel→20 cm=  Heel→  cm=  Heel→  cm= 

Midfoot=  Heel→20 cm=  Heel→  cm=  Heel→  cm= 

cm  cm  cm  cm 

Heel→10cm=  Heel→30 cm=  Heel→  cm=  Heel→  cm=  Previous compression stockings 

cm  cm  cm  cm 

Adherent to wearing compression stockings in past  Age of current compression stockings:     

Asymmetrical with contra‐lateral limb  Location: toes     foot     B/K A/K       sacral    ascites Description: Press finger into edema x 10 –15 seconds.  Pitting: 1+ = 0 ‐ ¼”      2+ = ¼” – ½”     3+ = ½ ‐ 1”    4+ = takes several minutes to rebound    non‐pitting brawny induration    Measurements:   cm  cm  cm  cm 

Heel→10 cm=  Heel→30 cm=  Heel→  cm=  Heel→  cm=  Previous compression stockings 

cm  cm  cm  cm 

Adherent to wearing compression stockings in past  Age of current compression stockings: 

h. LYMPHEDEMA ASSESSMENT  *NB‐ individuals can have symptoms of  both venous & lymphedema   or lymphedema  & lipedema  Right Leg  

Left  Leg 

  Positive Stemmer’s sign ‐ A thickened skin fold at the base  of the second toe that cannot be lifted    ISL stage I‐ accumulation of tissue  fluid that subsides with  limb elevation. The oedema may be pitting at this stage    ISL stage II ‐ Limb elevation alone rarely reduces swelling  and pitting is manifest   ISL late stage II ‐  There may or may not be pitting as tissue  fibrosis is more evident    ISL stage III ‐ The tissue is hard (fibrotic) and pitting is  absent. Skin changes such as thickening, hyperpigmentation,  increased skin folds, fat deposits and warty overgrowths   develop 

 Positive Stemmer’s sign ‐  A thickened skin fold at the base  of the second toe that cannot be lifted   ISL stage I ‐ accumulation of tissue  fluid that subsides with  limb elevation. The oedema may be pitting at this stage   ISL stage II ‐ Limb elevation alone rarely reduces swelling  and pitting is manifest  ISL late stage II ‐  There may or may not be pitting as tissue  fibrosis is more evident   ISL stage III ‐ The tissue is hard (fibrotic) and pitting is  absent. Skin changes such as thickening, hyperpigmentation,  increased skin folds, fat deposits and warty overgrowths   develop 

i. LIPEDEMA ASSESSMENT  *NB‐ individuals can have symptoms of both lymphedema & lipedema  Right Leg  

Left  Leg  

Lipedema S&S   “diet resistant” fat deposits in legs bilaterally with symmetry,  with no edema of feet   sharp demarcation between normal and abnormal tissue at  the ankle giving “pantaloon” appearance   fatty pads anterior to lateral malleolus & between achilles  tendon and medial malleolus 

Lipedema S&S  “diet resistant” fat deposits in legs bilaterally with symmetry,  with no edema of feet  sharp demarcation between normal and abnormal tissue at  the ankle giving “pantaloon” appearance  fatty pads anterior to lateral malleolus & between achilles  tendon and medial malleolus 

SWRWC Toolkit_B.2.2_Interdis. Lower Leg Assess. Tool_Jan 16 2011 Appropriate credit or citation must appear on all copied materials. 

3

 skin normal in texture without thickening or fibrosis seen in  skin normal in texture without thickening or fibrosis seen in  lymphedema (leg is soft, not hard)  lymphedema (leg is soft, not hard)  ACTIONS:  Refer to a WCS/ ET Nurse for assessment for compression bandaging. Refer to PT for ankle/calf‐muscle pump training.  j. SKIN & ANATOMY  Right Leg  

Left Leg 

Venous Signs & Symptoms 

Arterial Signs & Symptoms

Venous Signs & Symptoms

Arterial Signs & Symptoms

Varicosities  Hemosiderin staining   Chronic  Lipodermatosclerosis  Acute lipodermatosclerosis  Stasis dermatitis  Atrophie blanche  Woody fibrosis  Ankle (submalleolar) flare   Ulcer base moist with  granulation &/or yellow  slough/ fibrin   Ulcer located in gaiter  region (lower 1/3 of calf)   Ulcer located superior to  the medial malleolus   Scarring from prev. ulc. 

Hairless   Varicosities Hairless Also seen with Also seen with Thin  Hemosiderin staining  Thin  Neuropathy neuropathy Shiny  Chronic  Shiny  Dependent rubor  Dependent rubor  Lipodermatosclerosis  Blanching on elevation  Acute lipodermatosclerosis  Blanching on elevation  Feet cool/cold/blue  Stasis dermatitis  Feet cool/cold/blue  Toes cool/cold/blue  Atrophie blanche  Toes cool/cold/blue   Lower temperature in right  Woody fibrosis   Lower temperature in left   Ankle (submalleolar) flare  leg compared to left  leg compared to right  Capillary refill time: > 3   Ulcer base moist with  Capillary refill time: > 3  seconds  granulation &/or yellow  seconds   Ulcer located on foot or   Ulcer located on foot or  slough/ fibrin   Ulcer located in gaiter  toes  toes   Ulcer base pale and   Ulcer base pale and  region (lower 1/3 of calf)   Ulcer located superior to  dry&/or contains eschar  dry&/or contains eschar   Ulcer round and punched   Ulcer round and punched  the medial malleolus   Scarring from prev. ulc.  out in appearance  out in appearance   Gangrene wet/dry   Gangrene wet/dry   ACTIONS:   To determine “healability” in order to recommend moist wound healing, or to determine the safety of applying  compression bandages in all clients with ulcers below the knee who exhibit ANY signs and symptoms of arterial disease, or when  ANY compression bandaging is to be implemented,  refer to a WCS/ ET Nurse or diagnostic imaging for ABPI  assessment.   k. UNUSUAL ULCER  To be completed by WCS/ ET   Unusual location‐ ______________________________________________________  Unusual appearance____________________________________________________  Present longer than 6 months with failure to respond to optimal treatment ACTIONS:   Request tissue biopsy for wounds that suggest malignant growth or are non‐responsive. For ulcers suggestive of  pyoderma gangrenosum or cutaneous vasculitits, request referral to wound care specialist physician or dermatologist for biopsy  and treatment.  If etiology is uncertain, refer to wound care specialist physician.   

l. CIRCULATION: PULSE ASSESSMENT    Right Leg   Dorsalis‐Pedis:   Present   Diminished   Absent  Comments:     

Left Leg  Post‐Tibial:   Present   Diminished   Absent   

Dorsalis‐Pedis:  Present   Diminished   Absent  Comments: 

Post‐Tibial:  Present   Diminished   Absent 

m. CIRCULATION: ABPI*  To be completed by WCS/ ET or in Vascular Lab–this may be done within 6 months prior to admission by a qualified health  professional.  Right Leg   Left  Leg  Dorsalis Pedis:               Post‐tibial:             Dorsalis Pedis:    Post‐tibial:  Digital:               Digital:    Brachial:             ABPI:    Brachial:  ABPI:  SWRWC Toolkit_B.2.2_Interdis. Lower Leg Assess. Tool_Jan 16 2011 Appropriate credit or citation must appear on all copied materials. 

4

n. CIRCULATION: TOE PRESSURE or TOE BRACHIAL PRESSURE INDEX (TBPI)  done in Vascular Lab   Right Foot   Toe Pressure*:             Brachial:             TBPI:   

Left Foot Toe Pressure*:  Brachial:   TBPI: 

o. INTERPRETATION OF ABPI &/OR  TOE PRESSURES  AND LOWER LEG ASSESSMENT FINDINGS (See section F.6.6 re:  compression)  ACTIONS (when assessed by a health professional with an appropriate scope of practice ‐ MD or APN/ETN/WCS):   The measurements must always be interpreted within the context of the physical examination, assessment and client history.   Acceptable ABPI 0.8 to 0.9 → implement high compression therapy if indicated   Normal = 1.0 to 1.2. → implement high compression therapy if indicated   ABPI 0.8 ‐  1.2 in the presence of signs and symptoms of peripheral arterial disease, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes mellitus or  systemic vasculitis, further tests should be considered prior to initiating (high) compression    Abnormal  ABPI >1.2 (or unable to compress arteries )→ referral for further medical assessment e.g. segmental compression  studies &/or Toe Brachial Pressure Index. High reading could be due to abnormal vessel hardening from PVD, vessel calcification,  edema, woody fibrosis, advanced age and long‐standing hypertension.    Abnormal  ABPI 0.5 to 0.8 warrants referral for further medical assessment e.g. segmental compression studies &/or Toe  Brachial Pressure Index. May be mixed venous/arterial ulcers → implement reduced compression bandaging    Abnormal  ABPI