A F R I C A N J O U R N A L

A F R I C A N J O U R N A L OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL STUDIES Volu m e 1 1 ISSN 1531-4065 Num b e r 1 2 0 1 2 AFRICAN JOURNAL of DRUG DRUG and and ALC...
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A F R I C A N J O U R N A L OF DRUG AND ALCOHOL STUDIES

Volu m e 1 1

ISSN 1531-4065

Num b e r 1 2 0 1 2

AFRICAN JOURNAL of

DRUG DRUG and and

ALCOHOL STUDIES ALCOHOL STUDIES In this this issue: issue: In this Issue Social Networks and Hazardous Drinking Parental Influence on Substance Use Social Exclusion and Home-Made Alcohol Substance Use and Mental Disorders Drug Use and Personality

VOLUME 6

Resilience, Substance Abuse and Crime University and Substance Abuse Interventions

NUMBER 2 2007 CRISA

P U B L I S H E D

B Y

Centre for Research and Information on Substance Abuse

African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies

Purpose and Scope The African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies is an international scientific peer-reviewed journal published by the African Centre for Research and Information on Substance Abuse (CRISA). The Journal publishes original research, evaluation studies, case reports, review articles and book reviews of high scholarly standards. Papers submitted for publication may address any aspect of alcohol and drug use and dependence in Africa and among people of African descent living anywhere in the world. The term “drug” in the title of the journal refers to all psychoactive substances other than alcohol. These include tobacco, cannabis, inhalants, cocaine, heroin, prescription medicines, and traditional substances used in different parts of Africa (e.g., kola nuts and khat).

EDITORIAL AND MANAGEMENT TEAM EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Prof. Isidore Silas Obot Centre for Research and Information on Substance Abuse (CRISA) E-mail: [email protected]; [email protected] DEPUTY EDITORS West Africa Professor Hope Obianwu Niger Delta University Wilberforce Island, Nigeria Southern & Central Africa Professor Charles J. Parry Medical Research Council Cape Town, South Africa E-mail: [email protected] Eastern Africa Prof. David M. Ndetei University of Nairobi Nairobi, Kenya E-mail: [email protected] Francophone countries Prof. Baba Koumare Hopital Point G Bamako, Mali E-mail: [email protected] Rest of the world Prof. James T. Gire Virginia Military Institute Lexington, VA, USA E-mail: [email protected]

ASSOCIATE EDITORS Dr Neo Morojele Medical Research Council Pretoria, South Africa E-mail: [email protected]

Dr Nazarius Mbona Tumwesigye Makerere University Kampala, Uganda E-mail: [email protected] Dr Andrew Zamani Psychiatric Hospital Gwagwalada, Abuja, Nigeria E-mail: [email protected] MANAGING EDITOR Akanidomo J. Ibanga, CRISA E-mail: [email protected] EDITORIAL ASSISTANTS Pam Cerff, Cape Town, South Africa Danjuma Ojei, Jos, Nigeria EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Dr Reychad Abdool, Nairobi, Kenya Dr O.A. Ayo-Yusuf, Pretoria, South Africa Prof. Moruf Adelekan, Blackburn, UK Dr Yahyah Affinih, New York, USA Prof. E. E. O. Alemika, Jos, Nigeria Dr Pascal Bovet, Seychelles Prof. Layi Erinosho, Abuja, Nigeria Prof. A.J. Flisher, Cape Town, South Africa Dr Axel Klein, London, UK Prof. Hope Obianwu, Benin, Nigeria D. A. Pritchard, Swaziland

African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies

Volume 11, Number 1, 2012 CONTENTS

Social network characteristics, perceived drinking norms and hazardous alcohol use...................1 Gboyega Emmanuel Abikoye & Benjamin Oladapo Olley Parental influence on substance use among young people in the niger delta region, nigeria..........9 Festus Abasiubong, Alphonsus U. Idung, Sunday B. Udoh, & Uwemedimbuk S. Ekanem Social exclusion as a contributing factor for the addition of harmful substances to home-made alcohol: the case of mopani district in limpopo province, south africa.....................17 Jabulani C. Makhubele Prevalence and correlates of substance use among persons with mental disorders in a nigerian psychiatric hospital...................................................................................................29 Olukayode Abayomi, Tunde M. Ojo, Nurudeen Ibrahim, Adegoke O. Adelufosi, & Ayodeji Obasan Drug use among people who patronize beer parlours: the function of big five personality factors and self-monitoring..................................................................................37 Abiodun M. Lawal & Augustine O. Ogunsakin Narratives of resilience after a period of substance abuse and crime............................................45 Jane F. Kelly & Catherine L. Ward University and family collaboration in substance abuse intervention in nigeria: a private university case study......................................................................................................................55 Augusta Y. Olaore & Chidinma Aham-Chiabotu

Abstracting/Indexing services: The journal is indexed/abstracted by the following services: Addiction Abstracts, African Journals Online (AJOL), DrugScope, Applied Social Sciences Index, Social Services Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Scopus, Embasse, and PsycINFO.

African Journal of Drug & Alcohol Studies, 11(1), 2012 Copyright © 2012, CRISA Publications SOCIAL NETWORK CHARACTERISTICS, PERCEIVED DRINKING NORMS AND HAZARDOUS ALCOHOL USE

Gboyega Emmanuel Abikoye¹ & Benjamin Oladapo Olley² ¹Department of Clinical Psychology, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island, Bayelsa State, Nigeria. ²Department of Psychology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, Nigeria.

ABSTRACT Efforts by researchers, policy makers and other stakeholders to bring about significant reductions in alcohol use among the youth appears not to be yielding desired results, as the problem of hazardous drinking among the youth has persisted. One possible problem is that studies and policies on alcohol have not adequately situated the problem within relevant social contexts. This cross-sectional study examined the influence of social network characteristics, perceived drinking norms and demographic variables on hazardous drinking among 1,315 adult males newly recruited into a youth empowerment scheme in a state in Southwest Nigeria. Data were collected using structured questionnaire. Results showed that about 18% of the respondents reported scores falling within the hazardous drinking zones while 13% were abstainers. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were performed to explore the extent to which each of the network characteristics and other factors predicted hazardous drinking. Age (β = -.19; p0.001); 68 (26.7%) against 24 (8.8%) used hot drinks (x2=5.30; p>0.001); 45 (17.6%) against 19 (7.0%) used kolanuts (x2=3.60; p>0.001); 83 (32.5%) against 87 (31.9%) consumed local gin (x2=0.05; p0.001); while 77 (30.2%) against 62 (22.7%) consumed bitter kola (x2=1.86 p