50 Years of Community Action:

Empowering People & Building Communities 50 Years of Community Action: Honoring the Past, Preparing for the Future 2013 Annual Report Who We Are T...
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Empowering People & Building Communities

50 Years of Community Action: Honoring the Past, Preparing for the Future

2013 Annual Report

Who We Are The Connecticut Association for Community Action, Inc. (CAFCA) is the umbrella organization of Connecticut’s Community Action Agencies (CAAs), the state and federally designated anti-poverty agencies empowering people throughout Connecticut's 169 cities and towns.

Our Mission The mission of the Connecticut Association for Community Action (CAFCA) is to strengthen the capacity of its members to empower people in need and improve communities.

The Promise of Community Action Community Action changes people’s lives, embodies the spirit of hope, improves communities, and makes America a better place to live. We care about the entire community, and we are dedicated to helping people help themselves and each other.

CAFCA Staff Edith Pollock Karsky, Executive Director Rhonda Evans, Deputy Director Kelley Jacobson, Development, Communications and Grants Manager 2013 Annual Report designed by Susanne Kenney Written by Susanne Kenney Contributing writers: Denise Hanks (ABCD); Cindy Torrence (ACCESS); Nancy Micloskey (BCO); Lewis Beilman (CAANH); Lacey Byrne (CACD); Nancy Pappas (CRT); Caren Dickman, Marlo Greponne (HRA); Jeff Rouleau, William Rybczyk (NOI); Amanda Ruzicka, Mary Ann Vlahac (TEAM); Dawn Bates, David Yovaisis (TVCCA); Ben Daigle, Kelley Jacobson (CAFCA). Editor: Edith Pollock Karsky Special thanks go to all the CAA staff who helped submit outcome data, stories and photos for this report.

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Table of Contents

A Message from CAFCA’s Chair and Executive Director

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Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Inc. (ABCD)

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ACCESS Community Action Agency, Inc. (ACCESS)

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Bristol Community Organization, Inc. (BCO)

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Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH)

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Community Action Committee of Danbury, Inc. (CACD)

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Community Renewal Team, Inc. (CRT)

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Human Resources Agency of New Britain, Inc. (HRA)

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New Opportunities, Inc. (NOI)

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Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now, Inc. (NEON)

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TEAM, Inc. (TEAM)

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Thames Valley Council for Community Action, Inc. (TVCCA)

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CAFCA’s Accomplishments in 2013

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Partnerships

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Financial Report of CAFCA, Inc.

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Profile of Services by Agency

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Map of CAA Service Areas

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Community Action Agencies in CT

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A message from CAFCA In his 1964 State of the Union Address, President Lyndon B. Johnson publicly declared “unconditional war on poverty in America.” That declaration was followed by the passage and signing of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 (EOA). The EOA established that it was “the policy of the United States to eliminate James H. Gatling, Ph.D , Board Chairman and the paradox of poverty in the midst of plenty in this Edith Pollock Karsky, Executive Director Nation by opening to everyone the opportunity for education and training, the opportunity to work, and the opportunity to live in decency and dignity.” The newly established Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) was charged with overseeing most EOA programs—including Community Action Programs, implemented locally by Community Action Agencies. In the first years of the War on Poverty, America’s official poverty rate reached its lowest level on record. Unfortunately, as priorities shifted from the War on Poverty at home to armed conflicts abroad, budgets shifted as well. As a result, chronic underfunding threatened what President Johnson had once called “a unique opportunity and obligation to prove the success of our system.” Many aspects of Community Action have changed over time, but our values endure. That communities deserve to shape their destiny. That families experiencing poverty deserve the chance to rebuild their lives. That all of us are better off when each has a fair shot at the American Dream. And that while there should be no limit on how high a person may climb, we surely must limit how far we let each other fall. We are proud to mark Community Action’s 50th anniversary in 2014. We celebrate the positive, sustainable outcomes to which we continue to empower families and communities. But this is no time for jubilation. Budget projections at all levels indicate that unprecedented policy choices are looming. And we know all too well what happens to the voices of those at the margins when money is regarded as speech. Looking back, we see that the story of Community Action is the story of overcoming challenges together—the story of hope amid hardship. On this anniversary, let us recognize and honor the past but plan for the future. Let us expel the archaic attitude that inequity is inevitable and rail against the policies that have created the greatest inequality our nation has ever seen. Let us acknowledge and embrace that, yes, poverty is a choice: it is a choice of priorities, policies and programs! And let us devote ourselves to writing the next chapter of our common history guided by empathy and compassion, understanding that our choices reflect who we are as individuals, as a community and as a nation. In reading this report, you will find that even with Community Action’s lofty purpose, its story is grounded in reliable data and meaningful results. And, as you will see on the following pages, its story is about helping individuals and families get on their feet and participate more fully in their communities. Finally, when you are through reading, we invite you to join us in writing the next chapter in this story of empowering families and strengthening communities across Connecticut. We must write it together. 4

President Lyndon B. Johnson: A catalyst and voice for change… ~State of the Union Address, January 8, 1964

“…Unfortunately, many Americans live on the outskirts of hope—some because of their poverty, and some because of their color, and all too many because of both. Our task is to help replace their despair with opportunity…This administration today, here and now, declares unconditional war on poverty in America. I urge this Congress and all Americans to join with me in that effort…” “…Very often a lack of jobs and money is not the cause of poverty, but the symptom. The cause may lie deeper—in our failure to give our fellow citizens a fair chance to develop their own capacities, in a lack of education and training, in a lack of medical care and housing, in a lack of decent communities in which to live and bring up their children.” ~Remarks Upon Signing the Economic Opportunity Act, August 20, 1964

“Today for the first time in all the history of the human race, a great nation is able to make and is willing to make a commitment to eradicate poverty among its people...” “…we will reach into all the pockets of poverty and help our people find their footing for a long climb toward a better way of life…” “…We will work with them through our communities all over the country to develop comprehensive community action programs—with remedial education, with job training, with re-training, with health and employment counseling, with neighborhood improvement. We will strike at poverty's roots...” “…In helping others, all of us will really be helping ourselves. For this bill will permit us to give our young people an opportunity to work here at home in constructive ways as volunteers, going to war against poverty instead of going to war against foreign enemies…” 5

Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Inc. (ABCD) Established: 1964 Executive Director: Charles Tisdale 1070 Park Avenue Bridgeport, CT 06604 Tel. (203) 366-8241 Fax (203) 394-6175 www.abcd.org Serving: Bridgeport, Easton, Fairfield, Monroe, Stratford, and Trumbull.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

35,209 people benefitted from services 12,151 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

71% of our customers rent 27% of our customers own a home 1% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

37% African American 21% Caucasian 42% Hispanic 38% Other

Age ♦ ♦ ♦

40% 0—17 year olds 44% 18—54 year olds 16% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

44% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 22% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 34% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

Over 2,600 low income people obtained care for a child, eliminating an employment barrier and enabling them to continue or obtain employment



94% of youth participating in ABCD enrichment programs increased their academic, athletic or social skills



for school success 270 households reduced energy usage due to weatherization services



Over 1,800 children developed school readiness skills by participating in pre-school activities



568 senior citizens maintained an independent living situation as a result of services

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, After School and Summer Programs, Adult Education, Individual Development Accounts, Financial Education, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Eviction Prevention, Food Pantry, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that help… A new start for one family Janisha, a single mother with three children, relocated to Connecticut from Alabama after her boyfriend was tragically murdered. With very little money, she and her children were living with her aunt in a one bedroom apartment when she decided to seek rental assistance at ABCD. After a full assessment of her family’s situation, agency staff determined that Janisha’s current SSI (Supplemental Security Insurance) income was insufficient for her to support the basic needs of her three children, let alone rental payments. Through intensive case management services, Janisha’s needs were identified and addressed. Janisha’s first step was to find a job that would adequately support her family. With the assistance of an ABCD Case Worker, Janisha found a full-time position at Whole Foods Supermarket. With her employment set, Janisha was now motivated to find her own apartment. Again, with ABCD’s assistance, Janisha was connected with one of the agency’s partnering landlords and was assisted with her first month’s rent through Emergency Solutions Grant funds. To ensure that Janisha and her family were living in healthy conditions, she was connected with energy assistance services to help with her heating bill. This single mother, with a little help and support, is now on her way to self-sufficiency.

Dear Ruth Perrin, We just want to thank you for your overwhelming kindness in our intake application process. Just want to let you know how much your assistance kept my mom's grandson warm this year. He is on his third brain surgery due to brain cancer, and as you can imagine, it is financially and emotionally draining to deal with. She has also been dealing with my disabilities all my life. She has her hands full, so every little bit helps a lot, and I just wanted you to know how much we appreciate your kindness. Thank you so much for your public assistance with the community, you are irreplaceable. Thanks again!! Mike & Joanne N. P.S. Thanks for helping my mom get her social security card.

How much did we do statewide? 3,921 people obtained employment or self-employment Over 40,000 people learned skills and competencies required for employment 96% of people enrolled in employment services obtained a job 625 youth obtained job skills

Is anyone better off? Over 3,000 people increased their earned income and/or benefits from the previous year Over 40,000 Connecticut residents have acquired job skills that will help them obtain, maintain or advance in their employment paths 7

Access Community Action Agency, Inc. (ACCESS) Established: 1965 President/CEO: Peter DeBiasi 1315 Main Street Willimantic, CT 06226 Tel. (860) 450-7400/(860) 450-7454 www.accessagency.org

Fax (860) 450-7477

Serving: Andover, Ashford, Bolton, Brooklyn, Canterbury, Chaplin, Columbia, Coventry, Eastford, Ellington, Hampton, Hebron, Killingly, Mansfield, Plainfield, Pomfret, Putnam, Scotland, Somers, Stafford, Sterling, Thompson, Tolland, Union, Vernon, Willimantic, Willington, Windham, and Woodstock.

Who We Serve 29,424 women were provided with nutrition education and vouchers to purchase $1,507,162 worth of healthy food to promote their health and the health of their newborns.

Customer Impact ♦ ♦

20,273 people benefitted from services 12,189 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

53% of our customers rent 34% of our customers own a home 13% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

14% African American 42% Caucasian 14% Hispanic 37% Other

39% 0—17 year olds 48% 18—54 year olds 13% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

15% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 36% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 49% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

7,517 people received emergency food



Over 6,900 people received emergency fuel or utility payments so they could remain in a safe and healthy



living environment 1,630 parents improved their skills and strengthened their family



54% of unemployed individuals obtained a job



711 senior citizens maintained an independent living situation as a result of Access services

Our Services Employment and Training, Individual Development Accounts, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Homeless Shelter, Women, Infants and Children Food Program, Case Management and Counseling, Hawkins House Group Home, Parents Step Up Program, Child and Adult Care Food Program, Emergency Food Bank, Nontraditional Employment for Women Program, RISE YouthBuild Program, Crossroads, Mentoring Programs, Low-income Senior Housing, Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA), Lead Elimination Program.

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Services that help… Access’s Hour Exchange Program… Eva laughs when she describes how she first learned about the Windham Access Community Action Agency’s Hour Exchange, the Community Action Agency’s new community time bank. She remembers being approached by Access staff at a community event and saying, “No, thank you!” when offered literature about the program. “I didn’t realize then what a big part of my life the Hour Exchange would become,” she remembers. The Windham Area Hour Exchange is a network of individuals, organizations, and businesses that exchange services using a time-based currency, where one hour of service equals one “time dollar”. A year after its opening in October 2012, the Hour Exchange grew to 90 members who have exchanged over 900 hours of services including transportation, pet care, child care, home repair, resume writing, mentoring, cooking, health and wellness, and much more. Eva finally joined the program in May 2013 and has quickly come to exemplify what it means to be an “active” member of the Windham Area Hour Exchange! “I joined because I needed transportation for myself and my family, because we have no car,” Eva shared. “I’d had my doubts about how the program would work for us, but I thought I should check it out. And, I am so glad I did!” Eva enthusiastically set about earning time dollars toward her transportation needs as soon as she joined. Among other things, she has cooked meals for volunteers on Access’s Housing Now! Affordable housing construction sites and has set up and broken down equipment for Willimantic’s Third Thursday Street Festival, one of the Hour Exchanges’ organizational members. In return, Eva has been able to spend her time dollars on much-needed transportation to necessary appointments, classes, and functions for herself, her husband and her young daughter. Her family has also received transportation to join recreation department bus trips to fun places and events for their daughter. “She loves those trips so much!” Eva said. “I want to earn as many hours as I can because I want to make them happen for her.” Like so many of her fellow Hour Exchange members, Eva has also discovered that the rewards of service exchange go far beyond her family and the services they receive. “At first I was afraid to contact others through the Hour Exchange because I didn’t know how the members would react,” she remembers. “But, now I’m more involved, attending more program events, getting to know so many people, and exchanging tons of services!” In fact, Eva has built such good relationships and has enjoyed her involvement with the Hour exchange so much that she was elected by her fellow Hour Exchange members to the program’s “Kitchen Cabinet,” the Hour Exchange’s member advisory council. “I am willing to share new ideas and create new things for the Hour Exchange,” she says, and “I can’t wait to help it expand to give other families the same experience we had.”

How much did we do statewide? Over 9,600 people obtained access to needed healthcare 576 youth reduced their involvement with the criminal justice system 3,993 parents and caregivers improved their family functioning and/or behavior because of counseling

Is anyone better off? Thousands of low income people lived healthier lives because of access to health care Children in well-functioning homes are less likely to get into trouble at school, become involved in crime, or need other supportive services 9

Bristol Community Organization, Inc. (BCO) Established: 1972 Executive Director: Thomas Morrow 55 South Street Bristol, CT 06010 Tel. (860) 584-2725 Fax (860) 582-5224 www.bcoct.org Serving: Bristol, Burlington, Farmington, Plainville, and Plymouth.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

9,013 people benefitted from services 4,172 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

63% of our customers rent 32% of our customers own a home 5% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

6% African American 69% Caucasian 19% Hispanic 25% Other

33% 0—17 year olds 47% 18—54 year olds 20% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

36% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 24% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 36% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

280 senior citizens maintained their independent living situation as a result of BCO services



100% of the pre-schoolers enrolled in Head Start developed school readiness skills



4,500 individuals avoided utility termination or fuel crisis through an agency energy payment

♦ ♦

More than 700 barriers to employment were eliminated or reduced 1,500 rides were provided to low-income individuals and/or families

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Financial Education, Eviction Prevention, Food Pantry, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that help… Building a future Brittany participated in BCO’s Summer Youth Employment and Learning Program (SYELP) during the summers of her junior and senior years of high school. She successfully completed Career Competence Training, and gained work experience at Bristol Hospital and the New England Carousel Museum. Upon graduation in June—aside from SYELP— Brittany had no plans for continuing her education or for her future employment. She was unable to successfully obtain a full or even part-time position, and came to BCO for assistance and advice. Brittany indicated that she felt that her dyslexia was holding her back from accessing either option, since she had difficulty completing applications for both school and jobs. BCO introduced Brittany to the Rx For Success Program—a Pathways program that combines contextual learning in secondary education in partnership with Tunxis Community College—with a goal of eventual employment in the allied health care field. Excited about this possibility, Brittany completed her application and was enrolled in the program in the fall of 2012. Starting at Tunxis Community College in January 2013, Brittany successfully completed Integrative Reading and Writing I and Pre-Algebra with the utilization of both the IBEST model and the co-teaching of a BCO staff person. This ensured that her instruction was contextualized to address her learning disability, since she was more of a visual learner. Brittany has since progressed to Integrated Reading and Writing II. She is also enrolled in Customer Service Training and will receive a certification from the National Retail Federation. Simultaneously, she is enrolled in nutrition classes facilitated by the University of Connecticut and will receive a certification of completion when she completes her coursework. This fall, the position of Health Care Assistor became available through Beacon Drug. Brittany interviewed for the position and after the successful completion of extensive training, was hired at twenty hours per week at the rate of $10.50 per hour. The position aligns perfectly with the allied health field that the Rx For Success program successfully prepared her for, and Brittany is looking forward to the future! While Brittany officially exited the Rx for Success program in December 2013, the ongoing support of another year from the Rx program staff and her strong ambition to learn and work leaves her well on her way to a bright future!

How much did we do statewide? More than 2,400 people received emergency shelter services Emergency rental/mortgage payments prevented 2,177 individuals from becoming homeless Over 5,700 homes in the community were preserved or improved through weatherization or rehabilitation Over 4,700 people obtained or maintained safe and affordable housing

Is anyone better off? Families who live in safer, more stable housing can better manage their daily lives and their children’s nutrition, health and development, and academic performance Improved housing conditions due to weatherization or rehabilitation means a savings of money in energy costs that can be used towards other family necessities

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Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH) Established: 1977 President/CEO: Amos Smith 419 Whalley Avenue New Haven, CT 06515 Tel. (203) 387-7700 Fax (203) 397-7475 www.caanh.net Serving: East Haven, Hamden, New Haven, North Haven, and West Haven.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

29,247 people benefitted from services 10,051 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

75% of our customers rent 24% of our customers own a home 1% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

44% African American 22% Caucasian 29% Hispanic 29% Other

Age ♦ ♦ ♦

37% 0—17 year olds 45% 18—54 year olds 18% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

52% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 22% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 26% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

More than 450 barriers to employment were eliminated or reduced



2,483 individuals received translation services to assist them in obtaining benefits and services



More than 11,000 individuals avoided utility termination or fuel crisis through an agency energy payment



Over 800 individuals increased their knowledge of energy conservation

Our Services: Employment and Training, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Individual Development Accounts, Financial Education, Eviction Prevention, Meals on Wheels, Food Pantry.

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Services that work… Manage Your Future (MYF) CAANH’s MYF Program provides youth between the ages of fourteen and eighteen with financial literacy, job readiness and social development skills. CAANH recently received $300,000 per year for two years from the Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS) to expand the program locally and establish a similar program administered by the Urban League of Greater Hartford. This program expansion stems from the impact MYF has had on its participants. One participant, Joseph, joined the program to complete a community service requirement for his high school. During his time in the program, he learned how to better manage his money and his emotions. “I underwent a lot of character development,” he wrote in an essay. “I also got to see [the amount of] good that is done [at CAANH] in regards to helping people in need, especially with energy assistance.” Another participant, La Donte, learned the importance of managing money and long-term savings. After leaving the program, he enrolled in Husson University in Bangor, Maine. He is currently pursuing a degree in Business Administration, for which his MYF experience served him well. “Anyone can benefit from MYF,” he said. “It teaches you to save money, hold a job and be responsible.” In fact, the two youths highlighted above enjoyed the program so much that they still keep in touch with their program contact. Joseph actually plans on joining the program again—this time as a mentor. Joseph and La Donte are just two examples of how a program that makes a difference can also help create a difference!

The 5 x 5 Initiative The Community Action Agency of New Haven’s (CAANH) 5 x 5 Initiative will create positive change in an area afflicted by high unemployment rates, violence, and health disparities, among other things. As part of this initiative, CAANH will convene neighborhood meetings, conduct surveys and forge new relationships—not only to identify issues of concern, but to work towards transforming the community. The 5 x 5 Initiative began two years ago with trainings conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau and DataHaven. Initially, CAANH used the data gained from those trainings to plan its move to its current location, which is in the heart of the identified 5 x 5 area. This area includes the three Census tracts surrounding the agency's headquarters. As a final part of the initiative’s Readiness Phase, which is currently being implemented, CAANH is engaging local residents and stakeholders to improve the health and safety of people who live and work in the neighborhoods of the 5 x 5. The next phase of the 5 x 5 will involve identifying relevant partners. This Partnership Phase will last three to four years and will result in coalition-building among groups capable of conducting subject-based research, providing community outreach and training local employees. Research partners like Yale New Haven Hospital, DataHaven and the U.S. Census Bureau will help to establish baseline markers to which future improvements in the lives of 5 x 5 residents can be compared. Over time, the 5 x 5 will positively impact the lives of 15,000 people who reside within the 5 x 5. The window for this initiative is long-term—20 years—but CAANH anticipates touching the lives of approximately 3,500 people during the next three years. The end result of the initiative will be a healthier, safer, more vibrant community.

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Community Action Committee of Danbury, Inc. (CACD) Established: 1964 Executive Director: Michelle James 66 North Street Danbury, CT 06810 Tel. (203) 744-4700 Fax (203) 790-9693 www.cacd-caa.org Serving: Bethel, Bridgewater, Brookfield, Canaan, Cornwall, Danbury, Kent, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, North Canaan, Redding, Ridgefield, Roxbury, Salisbury, Sharon, Sherman, Warren, and Washington.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

11,532 people benefitted from services 4,959 families benefitted from services

The food pantry served 20,295 meals, reaching 2,255 people this past year.

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

65% of our customers rent 32% of our customers own a home Less than 1% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

12% African American 75% Caucasian 31% Hispanic 13% Other

34% 0—17 year olds 46% 18—54 year olds 20% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

29% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 27% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 44% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

More than 4,500 individuals received assistance with their heating bills



The food pantry served 20,295 meals, reaching 2,255 people last year



125 children between the ages of eighteen months and six years old received year-round care and school



readiness services 98 individuals were able to remain in their homes through emergency rent or mortgage assistance

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, Adult Education, Energy and Heating Assistance, Financial Education, Eviction Prevention, Food Pantry, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that work… CACD: Making a difference through innovative partnerships In the spring of 2013, CACD formed a partnership with Branford Hall, a local technical college. This relationship was formed specifically to compliment CACD’s Bilingual Support Services Program, which began in 2013. One of the key components of the Bilingual Support Services Program, in addition to comprehensive case management, is a Certified Nurse’s Aide (C.N.A) Program, which includes vouchers for students to obtain their C.N.A. certificate. Since its inception, CACD has enrolled twenty-eight students in the program. Twenty-two of those students have graduated, and eleven have been placed in a job.

“Taking action, one neighbor at a time” Anna, a nineteen year-old single mother of one, came to CACD’s office seeking help. Because her job required her to work from 5:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m., she needed to find day care for her child. Anna learned about CACD’s Action Early Learning Center and came to the agency to learn more. While applying for child care for her son, Anna also received information about other agency services including the diaper program, CACD’s food pantry and the C.N.A. program. Diapers and food were both identified as immediate needs for Anna, and were quickly addressed. By taking advantage of both services, Anna was then better able to manager her other financial obligations. Looking toward the future, Anna decided to register for the C.N.A. program and found out she qualified for the C.N.A. tuition program. With the support of a CACD Case Manager, she discovered federal grant opportunities that allowed her to further her education at Naugatuck Community College. She currently attends C.N.A. classes and is busy planning her next move to complete her college education. Doreen, a twenty-two year-old single mother of two, also went to CACD asking for help. She was behind on her rent, and also wanted to apply for SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits. Doreen had always worked, and never had to ask for this kind of help before. This was the first time she was unable to make ends meet. Through the supportive intake process conducted at CACD, Doreen also revealed that she was a victim of domestic violence. Recognizing the need for more intensive case management services, CACD provided Doreen with the help she needed to get connected to resources which allowed her to take things one day at a time, with hope for a brighter future.

How much did we do statewide? 2,183 youth increased their academic, athletic or social skills 485 fathers participated in classes and activities to strengthen their parenting skills Over 5,000 parents and caregivers improved family functioning as a result of classes or supportive services

Is anyone better off? 933 children at risk of Department of Children and Families (DCF) placement remained with family because of improved family functioning Increased and strengthened parenting skills built stronger and more stable families, leading to nurtured children who are able to develop healthier—emotionally, socially and academically 15

Community Renewal Team, Inc. (CRT) Established: 1963 President/CEO: Lena Rodriguez 555 Windsor Street Harford, CT 06120 Tel. (860) 560-5600 Fax (860) 527-3305 www.crtct.org Serving: Avon, Branford, Bloomfield, Canton, Chester, Clinton, Cromwell, Deep River, Durham, East Granby, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Hartford, East Windsor, Enfield, Essex, Glastonbury, Granby, Guilford, Haddam, Hartford, Killingworth, Madison, Manchester, Marlborough, Middlefield, Middletown, North Branford, Newington, Old Saybrook, Portland, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, South Windsor, Suffield, Westbrook, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Windsor, and Windsor Locks.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

112,467 people benefitted from services 45,568 families benefitted from services

3,882 homes were weatherized, keeping families warmer and experiencing more savings due to increased energy efficiency.

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

62% of our customers rent 26% of our customers own a home 9% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

11% Caucasian 33% African American 25% Hispanic 25% Other

36% 0—17 year olds 47% 18—54 year olds 17% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

56% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 18% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 26% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

1,173 unemployed individuals obtained a job



More than 27,300 barriers to employment were eliminated or reduced



5,000 people obtained health care services for themselves or a family member



6,586 seniors maintained an independent living situation as a result of services



More than 3,500 infants and children experienced improved health and physical development as a result of adequate nutrition

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Financial Education, Eviction Prevention, Supportive Housing, Food Pantry, Meals on Wheels, Homeless Shelters, Alternatives to Incarceration, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that help… For heroes back home In these tough economic times, many families are struggling to stay in their homes or find affordable housing. Veterans and their families are no exception. Troy Peterson, a veteran, was on the verge of losing his apartment after work injuries left him with mounting bills and no income. Ever resourceful, Troy initially helped around his building to offset his rent; but, the landlord finally asked him to leave because Troy’s debt was too large. Still, he looked for a way to avoid becoming homeless for the first time in his life. After graduating from high school, Troy served as a Navy Corpsmen. He went on to work in different industries and trades, including ten years as a computer repair technician. Despite his many skills he chose to pursue a career in truck driving, as the salary and opportunities for advancement seemed promising. Unfortunately, after a couple of years, he suffered a debilitating injury to his back and hand, leaving him unable to work. With child support payments mounting and very unstable housing, Troy suffered severe bouts of depression and anxiety. “I was heading CRT was one of 85 initial into a hole that was only getting deeper; I had no income, so the frustration was unbelievable,” he said. recipients to receive the

SSVF grant award in November 2011. As a SSVF provider, CRT fills the role of the SSVF Case Manager, who is an advocate, a coach and a link to critical support services in the community for veterans and their families who are at risk of homelessness.

After a visit to the VA Connecticut in Newington, he connected with CRT’s new Support Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program. In assessing his situation, Troy and his Case Manager determined that stable housing was his first priority. There was an opening at CRT’s transitional residence, Veteran’s Crossing, in East Hartford and in April 2012, it became Troy’s new home.

Over the next seven months, SSVF services helped Troy work with an attorney to obtain Social Security Disability Insurance, purchase a reliable vehicle, negotiate a new child support agreement, enroll in SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program) benefits, and his address dental issues. His Case Manager also helped him deal with the chronic anxiety that had plagued him for years. After obtaining a Veteran’s Administration housing voucher, Troy located an affordable apartment that is close to where his son lives. By Thanksgiving, he was unpacking and making plans for a more promising future. “It’s tough for some veterans to allow themselves to rely on others to fill in those missing tracks needed to get you to what you need. I’m glad I did because everything came together for me at once, and I’m now in a much better place,” said he says.

How much did we do statewide? Over 53,250 people received emergency food Emergency clothing was provided to more than 4,600 people More than 10,800 people received emergency vouchers for food, formula and/or diapers More than 105,000 households received emergency fuel or utility assistance through payment to the vendor

Is anyone better off? Connecticut residents presented with emergency situations were able to have their basic needs of food, clothing, and safe shelter met 17

Human Resources Agency of New Britain, Inc. (HRA) Established: 1964 Executive Director: Rocco Tricarico 180 Clinton Street New Britain, CT 06053 Tel. (860) 225-8601 Fax (860) 225-4843 www.hranbct.org Serving: New Britain.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

23,805 people benefitted from services 9,057 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

82% of our customers rent 17% of our customers own a home 1% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

67% Caucasian 13% African American 60% Hispanic 17% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 3% Other

37% 0—17 year olds 49% 18—54 year olds 14% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

51% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 29% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 20% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

482 individuals were unemployed and obtained a job More than 50,000 barriers to employment were eliminated or reduced

♦ ♦

2,409 individuals utilized agency tax preparation services More than 13,800 people received food assistance



Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, Energy and Heating Assistance, Eviction Prevention, Homeless Shelter, AIDS Prevention and Counseling, Substance Abuse Counseling, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that make a difference... HRA’s Build your own scholarship program “I’ll be on my own soon and I don’t want to depend on my parents or anyone else, so I really have to start saving money for college.” Nairobi Lopez will be the first one in her family to go to college. She wants to become an elementary school teacher. Nairobi was one of nine teens who took advantage of a unique opportunity to start building her own college scholarship fund this past summer as part of HRA’s Summer Youth Employment and Learning Program (SYELP). HRA’s SYELP is part of the State’s and Capital Workforce Partners’ regional summer employment and learning program. Participants started building their college funds by opening matched savings accounts with a portion of what they earned from their summer jobs. Participants deposited $50 of their weekly earnings into their new savings accounts at Farmington Bank. The American Savings Foundation and the U.S. Assets for Independence (AFI)/Individual Development Accounts (IDAs) matched their $250 savings with $2,000. By the end of the five weeks, each of these youth had $2,250 in their own scholarship fund. Some participants, like Jeannelys Flores, learned it was hard to save money. “I pay for my own clothes, fun and gas so every penny counts. I missed the extra $50 but know how important it is to save for college. ” HRA developed this new approach as a way to get teens invested in saving for their college education. No one in the country has done this with summer high school youth. Matched savings plans—for education, home buying, and starting a business—demand a long-term investment and commitment. “We designed a way to work with youth that integrates this program with other related high school and employment activities,” says Marlo Greponne, Director of Planning and Programs at HRA. Jeannelys wants to study marine biology and eventually do her own research at sea. She hopes to attend the University of Connecticut. “I was inspired by my Mom. She just graduated from college two years ago but she didn’t do it until her forties. It’s too important to wait that long.” Farmington Bank management came out to HRA’s Youth Services Center to open savings accounts with each of the participating teens. “They went out of their way to make this seamless for the kids,” says Marlo Greponne. “This pilot was a success because of the enthusiasm and contributions from all of the project’s partners.” Now that the summer is over, David McGhee, HRA’s Asset Management Coordinator, will work with these youth to complete the last step of the program: completing an education plan and a combination career and financial plan to achieve their long-term goals. After the program ended, five of the nine participating summer youth returned to high school. Marshalls hired Nairobi Lopez, one of these five, to keep working part-time after school. She plans to continue saving money in an unmatched savings account. The other four participants graduated high school and entered college this fall. Two of them were hired by their summer employers and will continue working part-time after classes. All four are also working on the last step: completing their college education.

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New Opportunities, Inc. (NOI) Established: 1964 President/CEO: Dr. James H. Gatling 232 North Elm Street Waterbury, CT 06702 Tel. (203) 575-9799 Fax (203) 755-8254 www.newoppinc.org Serving: Barkhamsted, Berlin, Bethlehem, Cheshire, Colebrook, Goshen, Hartland, Harwinton, Litchfield, Meriden, Middlebury, Morris, Naugatuck, New Hartford, Norfolk, Prospect, Southbury, Southington, Thomaston, Torrington, Wallingford, Waterbury, Watertown, Winchester, Wolcott, and Woodbury.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

625 low income seniors obtained $218,750 in state tax relief benefits through application assistance services.

67,279 people benefitted from services 27,003 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

69% of our customers rent 30% of our customers own a home 1% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

62% Caucasian 17% African American 34% Hispanic 1% Other

32% 0—17 year olds 46% 18—54 year olds 22% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

37% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 25% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 38% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

2,336 low income people obtained skills and competencies required for employment



1,465 households decreased energy usage due to weatherization services



Over 217,000 volunteer hours were donated to NOI



More than 9,600 seniors maintained an independent living situation as a result of services

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, Adult Education, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Individual Development Accounts, Financial Education, Eviction Prevention, Homeless Shelter, Alternatives to Incarceration, AIDS Prevention and Counseling, Substance Abuse Counseling, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that work… Piecing together creativity and collaboration to create opportunities New Opportunities, Inc. looks for creative ways to help people reach their goals. Whether it is a young couple buying their first home or an elderly person trying to maintain independent living, the staff is very resourceful in finding solutions to problems by leveraging programs and services. In accordance with its mission, agency staff aims to increase the self-sufficiency of those served and support their move out of poverty by maximizing their potential. Over the past four decades, NOI has remained dedicated to providing avenues to employment and training in the communities it serves. One of the agency’s most successful initiatives has been its Youth Employment program. Geared for those between the ages of fourteen and twenty-one, the program helps participants who are interested in learning in a work environment while simultaneously earning minimum wage. This approach has given hundreds of young adults an opportunity to experience career paths that spark their interest, while at the same time learning work etiquette and gaining work experience. In an effort to expand on this program, agency staff has worked to build partnerships with the business community to allow more opportunities for participants to work in such an environment. In 2009, a group of participants from Kennedy High School showed interest in pursuing a career in education. To meet this need, agency staff organized an agreement between the Workforce Board, the Connecticut State Department of Education, Kennedy High School, Naugatuck Valley Community College, and NOI’s Early Childhood Divisions (ECD). Through this unique collaboration, these students were able to earn money working in the ECD center, receive six of the nine college credits needed to obtain a Childhood Development Accreditation (CDA), and gain valuable experience for their future. Several of these students have since graduated and are now working in education. The real world experience they gained in the education field through this program has certainly helped them prepare for their current careers. Additionally, three other students—Christine, Sujey and Yamilette—are now NOI employees, and work at the Muriel H. Moore Child Development Center. Christine and Sujey both stated that they enjoyed the experience with the Youth Employment program while they were in school, and are thankful for the opportunity to participate. Christine added that she has always enjoyed working with children, and has always known that she wanted to be a teacher. Creating opportunities by leveraging resources allows an agency like New Opportunities to capitalize on the strengths of the organization in a cost-effective manner. Designing a successful program that reaches a desired outcome can only happen with a collaborative effort. The Youth Employment program is a great example of such a collaboration, and really shows how the public, private and nonprofit sectors can work together to effectively serve the community.

“I Hold a Piece” project New Opportunities, Inc., in collaboration with Thynk Tank, LLC., recently began the development of a video that captures the essence of what drives the organization. Following a twelve month planning and production process, a video and website, “I Hold a Piece,” was created. The video showcases the agency’s commitment to service provision and innovation—the cornerstones of agency operations. The video also highlights a number of NOI’s programs and long-term development strategies, which will help to shape the future of the agency. The concept of everyone doing their part (staff, customers, and community partners) and holding their piece of the puzzle epitomizes what has driven New Opportunities over the past fifty years to get where it is today. The video is also meant to reach new target audiences, including private donors, who may be unaware of the impact that New Opportunities has in their communities. Finally, the video is also driving an agency marketing strategy, slated to be rolled out in the Spring of 2014. 21

Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now, Inc. (NEON) Established: 1964 Interim President/CEO: Rev. Tommie Jackson 98 South Main Street South Norwalk, CT 06854 Tel. (203) 899-2420 Fax (203) 899-2430 www.neoncaa.org Serving: Darien, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Stamford, Weston, Westport, and Wilton.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

13,825 people benefitted from services 5,530 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

73% of our customers rent 23% of our customers own a home 4% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race/Ethnicity ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

43% Caucasian 27% African American 34% Hispanic 28% Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander 2% Other

Age ♦ ♦ ♦

36% 0—17 year olds 45% 18—54 year olds 19% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

46% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 22% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 32% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

More than 3,000 barriers to initial or continuous employment were reduced or eliminated

♦ ♦

308 individuals obtained skills and competencies required for employment 383 parents learned and exhibited improved parenting skills



More than 700 people demonstrated the ability to complete and maintain a budget for 90 days

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, Adult Education, After School and Summer Programs, Energy and Heating Assistance, Individual Development Accounts, Eviction Prevention, Homeless Shelter, Food Pantry, Alternatives to Incarceration, AIDS Prevention and Counseling, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that work… Nourishing the mind and body As the school year comes to an end, kids’ thoughts go towards vacations, trips to the beach, riding their bikes and just hanging out at home. For siblings Joey and Jason, however, thoughts go straight to what fun lies ahead for them at NEON’s Summer Day Camp Program. NEON’s Summer Day Camp Program serves 250 children between the ages of five and twelve. This past summer’s theme, “Coming to Stage,” offered campers a hands-on experience in the media arts, and other camp activities as well. In addition to participating in these activities, all campers received a nutritious breakfast, lunch and snack every day—a much needed service for kids like Joey and Jason. This food service provided nutrition to the boys and a was also a huge relief to their mom, Denise, who struggles to make ends meet at home. “Both of my children participate in their school’s lunch program during the school year, and I was really worried about how we would make it through the summer,” Denise said. “It was so comforting to know that Joey and Jason were not only able to participate in all that NEON’s Summer Day Camp had to offer, but that they were provided with two nutritious meals, and a snack every day as well. Thank you, NEON!”

An Agency in Transition…. Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now, Inc. (NEON) has been in a period of transition and upheaval this past year. After merging with CTE, Inc. in 2012, the Greater Stamford area Community Action Agency, many changes took place at the board and management level in an effort to create a successful agency to serve the residents of lower Fairfield County. However, during and following the merger a number of management and financial reporting concerns were identified, which required intervention. CAFCA partnered with the Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS) in an effort to provide management assistance, as well as Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA), to the agency. Despite this collaboration, NEON continues to face challenges that have hindered the agency’s successful transition. Going forward and as we move into 2014, it is important to recognize that CAFCA is working closely with its partners and Connecticut’s Community Action Network to ensure critical programs and services continue to be effectively delivered to our state’s neediest residents in Stamford, Norwalk, and the surrounding cities and towns. This includes providing identified T/TA needs to the agency. This past fall, CAFCA sponsored board training by our national legal arm, CAPLAW (Community Action Program Legal Services, Inc.), to the NEON board. During this next year, we will make sure the agency has access to any additional T/TA that may be needed. CAFCA and its partners remain committed to take the necessary steps to identify and address any issues that may arise and ensure that all essential services―energy, food and housing assistance, child care, adult day care, fatherhood, literacy programs, after-school programs, job training, and many others―remain fully available to those who need them.

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TEAM, Inc. (TEAM) Established: 1965 President/CEO: Richard Knoll 30 Elizabeth Street Derby, CT 06418 Tel. (203) 736-5420 Fax (203) 736-5425 www.teaminc.org Serving: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bethany, Derby, Milford, Orange, Oxford, Seymour, Shelton, and Woodbridge.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

TEAM partnered with 131 businesses to collect toy donations for its Toys 4 kids holiday toy drive. Toys were donated to 6,200 children and outside agencies.

12,245 people benefitted from services 5,441 families benefitted from services

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

66% of our customers rent 32% of our customers own a home 2% of our customers are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race

Age

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

♦ ♦ ♦

66% Caucasian 13% African American 18% Hispanic 18% Other

34% 0—17 year olds 43% 18—54 year olds 23% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

42% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 22% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 36% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

100% of the IDA (Individual Development Accounts) participants increased their savings



More than 900 seniors maintained an independent living situation as a result of services

♦ ♦

934 infants and children experienced improved health and physical development as a result of adequate nutrition 715 tax returns were filed and clients received a total of approximately $1,300,000 in refunds



10,588 meals were provided at the Senior Community Cafes, and almost 53,000 meals were delivered to homebound seniors

Our Services Employment, Head Start, Pre-school, Energy and Heating Assistance, Eviction Prevention, Financial Education, Individual Development Accounts, Meals on Wheels, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that change lives… Two women’s journeys to self-sufficiency Rose’s journey started many years ago, when she and her son (now 18) lived in “an awful place” and she was on welfare and food stamps. It was a flyer that changed it all—the flyer Rose saw at Derby day care that gave information about TEAM’s Toys 4 Kids program. Rose decided to enroll her son. “At the time I wasn’t working and didn’t know how to give my son some toys for the holidays. It was a blessing that with TEAM’s Toys 4 Kids drive, he was able to get a bike.” She also found out about the many services TEAM has to offer, and over the years, Rose has worked with many people at the agency. “TEAM helped me with my resume. I was able to write it on a computer at TEAM because I didn’t have a computer at home. My first job off welfare paid $7.00 per hour. TEAM helped me get a new start, new job, and new life.” As a result of going to TEAM, Rose was able to get a job, purchase her first home, and purchase a car with the money she saved through the IDA (Individual Development Account) program. Rose said that if it wasn’t for TEAM, she’d still be renting and it would be harder to get a better job using public transportation. “People at TEAM are easy to talk with, and communication is a big plus. There are people working there that I can relate to and they understand where I’m coming from. They relate to my problems and offer suggestions and resources.” Anna is a single parent working in a low wage job in Milford. To meet her family’s increasing financial needs, she had to either work longer hours or get additional training to enhance her employment prospects. Both options required Anna to find day care for her daughter, which proved to be a challenge. Anna heard about TEAM from a neighbor who recommended the agency as the only place to go that listened to what someone needed. As a result of her first meeting with TEAM staff, Anna enrolled her daughter in the agency’s day care program. The hours allowed her to work longer and take training classes. She was initially worried about how her daughter would fit into the program. TEAM staff were able to quickly put Anna’s worries to rest. During her daughter’s first day, play dates were arranged for Anna and her daughter with some of the other parents and children enrolled in the program. This helped her daughter to quickly assimilate into the classroom, and soon she was looking forward to going to “school” every day. Anna was now able to focus on her work and training, and know that her daughter was happy, safe and learning. While her daughter was in day care, Anna completed her Certified Nursing Assistant (C.N.A.) training, got a promotion, and increased her financial stability. In her words, “I am here today. There is no other place I could turn to—TEAM is it. TEAM is great for communication. They know me and helped me when complications in my life set in. They helped set up workable timetables and goals to reach. Communication is key.”

How much did we do statewide? Over 21,000 seniors maintained an independent living situation as a result of support services Over 13,700 seniors participated in congregate meals programs or received home-delivered meals Seniors volunteered over 480,000 hours

Is anyone better off? Through social interaction, community involvement, adequate nutrition and routine medical care, seniors were able to maintain their health and well-being and avoid institutionalization 25

Thames Valley Council for Community Action, Inc. (TVCCA) Established: 1965 Executive Director: Deborah Monahan 1 Sylvandale Road Jewett City, CT 06351 Tel. (860) 425-6503 Fax (860) 376-7015 www.tvcca.org Serving: Bozrah, Colchester, East Lyme, Franklin, Griswold, Groton, Lebanon, Ledyard, Lisbon, Lyme, Montville, New London, North Stonington, Norwich, Old Lyme, Preston, Salem, Sprague, Stonington, Voluntown, and Waterford.

Who We Serve Customer Impact ♦ ♦

24,603 people benefitted from services 10,893 families benefitted from services

More than 61,000 volunteer hours were donated to TVCCA by low-income individuals this past year.

Housing ♦ ♦ ♦

67% of our families rent 30% of families own a home 3% of our families are homeless

Demographic Breakdown Race ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦

70% Caucasian 14% African American 17% Hispanic 16% Other

Age ♦ ♦ ♦

35% 0—17 year olds 44% 18—54 year olds 21% 55—70+ year olds

Income ♦ ♦ ♦

34% are living between 0 and 100% of the Federal Poverty Level 28% are living between 101% and 150% of the Federal Poverty Level 38% are living at 151% or higher of the Federal Poverty Level

How we help ♦

More than 6,600 barriers to employment were reduced or eliminated



2,282 seniors maintained an independent living situation as a result of services



100% of individuals avoided eviction through agency mediation



More than 1,200 children participated in pre-school activities to develop school readiness skills



More than 420 pregnant women who received WIC (Women, Infant and Children) services achieved appropriate weight gain

Our Services Employment and Training, Head Start, Pre-school, Adult Education, Energy and Heating Assistance, Weatherization, Individual Development Accounts, Financial Education, Eviction Prevention, Homeless Shelter, Housing Assistance, Supportive Housing, Women, Infants, and Children Food Program, AIDS Prevention and Counseling, Information and Referral, Case Management and Counseling.

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Services that help… TVCCA’s Shelter Services When they first came to TVCCA, the Taylor family had no place to live. Seeking the agency’s homeless shelter services, they decided to bring just two of their four children with them and had their two oldest, school-aged children stay with their grandparents, who were willing to keep them in their home to prevent any upset to their daily routine. Both Mr. and Mrs. Taylor entered TVCCA’s shelter not just wanting a place to stay, but with a hope of gaining stability for their family and reuniting with their two other children. The Taylors’ stay at the shelter not only provided them with temporary housing. It also allowed them to be able to work with various agency Case Managers to get back on their feet and plan for the future of their family. With TVCCA’s support, the Taylors were able to create, set and achieve goals and benchmarks towards their financial stability. In addition, they were able to secure their own apartment in Norwich with funds from the rapid re-housing program. Today, the Taylor family is living happily together under one roof. They continue to work on their goals and use the assistance of community services—especially agencies like TVCCA—when needed.

A note of thanks… “I am writing to thank all of you for the kindness and generosity that you have given to me and my son, Christopher. The assistance that I have received, and still am receiving, for almost a year now is truly, unbelievably grateful. There are no words to describe how thankful I am. I have received WIC [Women, Infants and Children] coupons for food items for myself throughout the majority of my pregnancy and for my eight month old, including juice, cheese, milk, eggs, cereal, and more. The program saved me the money I needed to buy my baby clothes, learning toys, bottles, and blankets. I cannot thank you enough. I just wanted to take some time and express my feelings. Thank you!” — Amanda

How much did we do statewide? 11,427 infants and children improved in heath and physical development as a result of adequate nutrition More than 6,300 children participated in pre-school activities 9,047 infants and children received age appropriate immunizations, medical and dental care

Is anyone better off? Children who participated in pre-school activities were better prepared to start and succeed in school Infants and children remain healthier when exposed to routine medical and dental care, adequate nutrition, and engagement in social and physical activities, allowing for more stability for their parent’s employment and/or education

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CAFCA’s Accomplishments in 2013 Here are some highlights of CAFCA’s work in assisting our agencies to empower people in need and improve communities.

Connecticut Poverty Report In January, CAFCA released Meeting the Challenge: The Dynamics of Poverty in Connecticut, or simply known as, the CT Poverty Report. With funding from the Connecticut Department of Social Services (DSS), CAFCA partnered with the University of Connecticut Center for Economic Analysis and BWB Solutions to produce a comprehensive analysis of statewide poverty and economic trends over a twenty-year period. The report took a step toward describing, statistically and anecdotally, and in narrative and graphic form, just how deep and wide the conditions of poverty are that exist in Connecticut. The CT Poverty Report analyzed and studied statewide employment and economic trends from 1990 to 2010 in conjunction with federal poverty levels and, in turn, developed findings and actionable recommendations to address the causes and conditions of poverty in our state. Major findings from the report include: •

• •

Poverty in Connecticut increased significantly from 1990 to 2010. As of 2010, there were more than 720,000 people―21% of all residents in the state―either living in poverty or facing the uncertainty of falling into poverty. Poverty growth is closely tied to stagnant job creation, and Connecticut had the worst job creation record in the nation over the 20-year period studied. Connecticut can and must do a better job of creating and supporting educational opportunities and the conditions that support job creation.

Steps that can be taken to reverse these trends include implementing comprehensive economic development planning; aligning credential requirements with job-specific tasks; supporting education and training initiatives; and, creating a data center to store, track and analyze economic and jobs related data. Employment is the primary pathway out of poverty, and these recommendations offer low-income residents at or near poverty real solutions at little or no cost to the state. This report has not only helped educate our member Community Action Agencies (CAAs) and the public about the depth and breadth of poverty in Connecticut, but has also helped to strengthen our message on the ramifications of poverty to state leaders and lawmakers.

Engaging Leaders The 2013 New England Community Action Conference: Bringing People Together to Learn for a Better Tomorrow was held on May 15-17 in Portland, Maine. Community Action representatives and state association staff from the six New England states―Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont―collaborated and developed a conference that offered training around Results Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA) as well as workshops on a variety of topics including Weatherization, Succession Planning, Affordable Housing, and Low Income Home Energy Assistance.

Connecting Families with Needed Supports CAFCA launched the effective, user-friendly Automated Benefits Calculator, or “ABC,” three years ago and has continued to build improvements and updates into the calculator. ABC has been accessed by thousands of online users at www.cafca.org. ABC was also integrated into CAAs’ case management and energy assistance software to better equip CAA staff to connect customers to appropriate services. ABC has received recognition at local, state and national levels as an innovative step in using technology to maximize assistance. This year, CAFCA staff provided numerous trainings on how to use ABC to human service agencies and organizations across the state.

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Rapid Health Impact Assessment (HIA) With funding provided from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Weatherization Plus Health Initiative, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the American Public Health Association, CAFCA and New Opportunities, Inc. partnered with the National Center for Healthy Housing and the National Center for State Community Services Programs, as well as weatherization and healthy homes stakeholders, to put together the state’s first Rapid Health Impact Assessment (HIA). The HIA—a data-driven tool that brings health and safety information to the table for decisions made outside of the health arena―was utilized to inform how best to invest federal, state and utility ratepayer resources to reach Connecticut’s goal to weatherize 80% of its housing stock by 2030. Specifically, it looked at what implications this goal will have on the health of Connecticut residents and especially low-income households, where housing has a considerable impact on the health and the life chances of children. The HIA will be used to help inform state policy makers around health and energy efficiency policies.

Strengthening our Member Agencies with Training and Technical Assistance Every year, CAFCA works with DSS and the Northeast Institute for Quality Community Action (NIQCA) to ensure that Training and Technical Assistance (T/TA) is offered to our member agencies to secure and strengthen their organizational capacity. In 2013, this support focused on the areas of governance, financial management and accountability, and improved outcome reporting. Additionally, this year, more than 100 staff were trained on Results Oriented Management and Accountability (ROMA), an outcome-focused management system used to promote and ensure greater effectiveness and better results on the family, agency and community levels. Training was provided through a combination of several training sessions offered throughout the year, in addition to a special ROMA track that was offered at the New England Community Action Conference. CAFCA holds bi-monthly meetings with the CAA network planners group and quarterly meetings of the CAA Finance Directors to address new and changing agency requirements, guidelines and program or contract obligations. These sessions provide opportunities to share best practices and identify potential infrastructure issues before they become problematic.

Strengthening Partnerships and Providing Leadership The Region I Community Action Association, the New England Community Action Partnership (NECAP), continues to represent State Associations and CAAs across New England. Connecticut’s CAA representatives to NECAP are Amos Smith, President of NECAP, CAANH President/CEO, and Vice Chair of CAFCA; Edith Pollock Karsky, Executive Director of CAFCA; and, Rocco Tricarico, Executive Director of HRA and CAFCA Treasurer. The 2013 NECAP Annual Meeting and Issues Forum, Embracing Change and Moving Forward Together, was held in September in Connecticut. Attended by CAA Executive Directors and upper-level management, the forum included keynote speakers David Bradley, Executive Director, National Community Action Foundation (NCAF) and our national lobbyist; Eleanor Evans, Executive Director, Community Action Program Legal Services, Inc. (CAPLAW); and, Connecticut Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman. A panel discussion on topics such as succession planning, the future of community action, and leadership development followed with veteran CAA Executive Directors from Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, and Vermont. CAFCA continues to be the grantee for the Regional Performance and Innovation Consortia (RPIC) for New England in 2012-2014. CAFCA has been working in close partnership this past year with the State Associations and the state CSBG officials in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont to continue to implement this important initiative. This includes capacity building, strengthening exemplary practices, and involvement in the development of community action performance standards.

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Community Action ...addressing all the needs of the customer Community Action doesn’t just save lives by helping people with their immediate needs—it also empowers them to build better lives for themselves. Through an integrated service delivery approach, the Human Services Infrastructure (HSI), customers are connected to services that will support them as they move towards greater levels of self-sufficiency and economic security. Customers find that there is no wrong door to enter when coming to a Community Action Agency. Regardless of why they come, individuals and families will find Case Managers ready to help them determine their likely eligibility for many services. Every customer is offered the opportunity to have comprehensive case management services provided to them to help address their specific needs.

How much did we do statewide? Over 363,000 people benefited from CAA services last year Over 100,000 barriers to initial or continuous employment were reduced or eliminated

Is anyone better off? With the reduction or elimination of barriers, such as child care, healthcare, transportation, job skills, and education, more than 3,900 people went back to work Through integrated services, more than 363,000 people had an emergency need eliminated or moved towards greater levels of self-sufficiency and economic security

Community Action ...partnering for a stronger Connecticut Community Action Agencies across the state reported more than 1,600 partnerships with 1,573 organizations. These collaborations help connect our customers to much needed supports and services. By working together, we help strengthen our families and give them a brighter future!

Other: 5% School Districts & post secondary education & training 3% Statewide associations 2% Health Service Institutions 2% Financial Institutions

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Financial Report of CAFCA, Inc. for year ending December 31, 2012 Support & Revenue Grants and Contracts Federal Program and other income

$ 832,860 $ 61,716

Total:

$894,576

Expenses Salaries and benefits Professional fees & contractual services Materials & supplies Other Conferences and meetings Occupancy Travel and transportation

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

453,582 291,590 29,495 50,288 53,845 29,408 24,238

Total:

$ 932,446

Change in net assets from operating activities

$37,870

CAFCA’s 990 can be found online at www.cafca.org

Leveraging Resources to End Poverty Connecticut CAA Funding Sources The core operational funding for CAAs is the federal Community Services Block Grant (CSBG). With that funding ($8,174,411 in FY 2012), CAAs are able to leverage additional funds, create partnerships, conduct local assessments and planning, and organize volunteers. In 2012, Connecticut CAAs brought $34,452,573 in Recovery Act funds into the state and put these funds to work empowering people and building communities. Connecticut CAAs utilize diverse funding sources in our anti-poverty work. Mostly through competitive, private, state and federal grants, Connecticut Community Action Agencies directed over $200 million toward fighting the effects and causes of poverty in 2012.

2012 Funding Sources for Connecticut CAA Network Federal (non-CSBG & ARRA) Federal-CSBG Federal-ARRA (non-CSBG) State Local Private

$ 163,697,945 $ 8,174,411 $ 34,452,573 $ 49,968,041 $ 3,730,088 $ 26,183,644

Total:

$286,206,702

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Family Development/Parenting Education

Holistic Case Management/Info & Referral

Strengthening

Senior Support Services

RSVP & Senior Volunteer Programs

Women, Infants & Children (WIC)

Meals on Wheels/Congregate Meals

Food Pantries

Children & Adult Care Food Program

Supportive Housing

Homelessness Prevention/Rapid Rehousing

Eviction Prevention & Mediation

Families

Seniors

Nutrition

Emergency Rental/Mortgage Payment

Shelter

Emergency Shelter

Affordable and/or Subsidized Housing

Substance Abuse Prevention & Counseling

Housing &

















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Health Care Access/Medical Transportation

HIV/AIDS Prevention & Counseling



Counseling: Individual and/or Family

Health









Weatherization/WRAP





Weatherization









Matching Payment Programs



Assistance &





Energy Assistance & Emergency Fuel

Energy









One-Stop Employment Youth and Young Adults

& Training

Vocational & Skills Training



Adult Education

Employment ● ●

















Halfway Houses & Re-Entry

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NOI













NEON





Youth Dev- After School & Summer Programs













HRA

Alternatives to Incarceration





Infant-Toddler/Early Head Start

Specialized Care & Education

Development

Criminal Justice









Head Start





Youth











CT Child Day Care & School Readiness

Free Income Tax Preparation

Child Care &











CRT

Financial Counseling

CACD

Development

CAANH ●

BCO



Access

Individual Development Accounts

ABCD

Asset

Programs/Service Area



































TEAM





































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TVCCA

1

Access Community Action Agency, Inc. (ACCESS)

2

Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Inc. (ABCD)

3

Bristol Community Organization, Inc. (BCO)

4

Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH)

5

Community Action Committee of Danbury, Inc. (CACD)

6

Community Renewal Team, Inc. (CRT)

7

Human Resources Agency of New Britain, Inc. (HRA)

8

New Opportunities, Inc. (NOI)

9

Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now, Inc. (NEON)

10

Thames Valley Council for Community Action, Inc. (TVCCA)

11

TEAM, Inc. (TEAM) 33

Community Action Agencies in CT Action for Bridgeport Community Development, Inc. (ABCD) Executive Director: Charles Tisdale Tel. (203) 366-8241 Email: [email protected]

1070 Park Avenue, Bridgeport, CT 06604 Fax (203) 394-6175 Website: www.abcd.org

Towns Served: Bridgeport, Easton, Fairfield, Monroe, Strafford, and Trumbull.

Access Community Action Agency, Inc. (Access) President/CEO: Peter DeBiasi Tel. (860) 450-7400 / 860-450-7454 Email: [email protected]

1315 Main Street, Suite 2, Willimantic, CT 06226 Fax (860) 450-7477 Website: www.accessagency.org

Towns Served: Andover, Ashford, Bolton, Brooklyn, Canterbury, Chaplin, Columbia, Coventry, Eastford, Ellington, Hampton, Hebron, Killingly, Mansfield, Plainfield, Pomfret, Putnam, Scotland, Somers, Stafford, Sterling, Thompson, Tolland, Union, Vernon, Willington, Windham, and Woodstock.

Bristol Community Organization, Inc. (BCO) Executive Director: Thomas Morrow Tel. (860) 584-2725 Email: [email protected]

55 South Street, Bristol, CT 06010 Fax (860) 582-5224 Website: www.bcoct.org

Towns Served: Bristol, Burlington, Farmington, Plainville, and Plymouth.

Community Action Agency of New Haven, Inc. (CAANH) President/CEO: Amos Smith Tel. (203) 387-7700 Email: [email protected]

419 Whallley Avenue, New Haven, CT 06515 Fax (203) 397-7475 Website: www.caanh.net

Towns Served: East Haven, Hamden, New Haven, North Haven, and West Haven. (Many contracts extend beyond these towns).

Community Action Committee of Danbury, Inc. (CACD) Executive Director: Michelle James Tel. (203) 744-4700 Email: [email protected]

66 North Street, Danbury, CT 06810 Fax (203) 790-9693 website: www.cacd-caa.org

Towns Served: Bethel, Bridgewater, Brookfield, Canaan, Cornwall, Danbury, Kent, New Fairfield, New Milford, Newtown, North Canaan, Redding, Ridgefield, Roxbury, Salisbury, Sharon, Sherman, Warren, Washington.

Community Renewal Team, Inc. (CRT) President/CEO: Lena Rodriguez Tel. (860) 560-5600 Email: [email protected]

555 Windsor Street, Hartford, CT 06120 Fax (860) 527-3305 Website: www.crtct.org

Towns Served: Avon, Branford, Bloomfield, Canton, Chester, Clinton, Cromwell, Deep River, Durham, East Granby, East Haddam, East Hampton, East Hartford, East Windsor, Enfield, Essex, Glastonbury, Granby, Guilford, Haddam, Hartford, Killingworth, Madison, Manchester, Marlborough, Middlefield, Middletown, North Branford, Newington, Old Saybrook, Portland, Rocky Hill, Simsbury, South Windsor, Suffield, Westbrook, West Hartford, Wethersfield, Windsor, Windsor Locks. (Many contracts extend beyond these towns.)

34

Human Resources Agency of New Britain, Inc. (HRA) Executive Director: Rocco Tricarico, J.D. Tel. (860) 225-8601 Email: [email protected]

180 Clinton Street, New Britain, CT 06053 Fax (860) 225-4843 Website: www.hranbct.org

Town Served: New Britain

New Opportunities, Inc. (NOI) President/CEO: James H. Gatling, Ph.D. Tel.(203) 575-9799 Email: [email protected]

232 North Elm Street, Waterbury, CT 06702 Fax (203) 755-8254 Website: www.newopportunitiesinc.org

Towns Served: Barkhamsted, Berlin, Bethlehem, Cheshire, Colebrook, Goshen, Hartland, Harwinton, Litchfield, Meriden, Middlebury, Morris, Naugatuck, New Hartford, Norfolk, Prospect, Southbury, Southington, Thomaston, Torrington, Wallingford, Waterbury, Watertown, Winchester, Wolcott, and Woodbury.

Norwalk Economic Opportunity Now, Inc. (NEON) (Now serving lower Fairfield County)

Interim President/CEO: Reverend Tommie Jackson Tel. (203) 899-2420 98 South Main Street, S. Norwalk, CT 06854 Email: [email protected] Fax (203) 899-2430 Website: www.neoncaa.org Towns Served: Darien, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Stamford, Weston, Westport, and Wilton.

TEAM, Inc. (TEAM)

President/CEO: Richard Knoll Tel. (203) 736-5420 Email: [email protected]

30 Elizabeth Street, Derby, CT 06418 Fax (203) 736-5425 Website: www.teaminc.org

Towns Served: Ansonia, Beacon Falls, Bethany, Derby, Milford, Orange, Oxford, Seymour, Shelton, and Woodbridge.

Thames Valley Council for Community Action, Inc. (TVCCA) Executive Director: Deborah Monahan Tel. (860) 425-6503 Email: [email protected]

1 Sylvandale Road, Jewett City, CT 06351 Fax (860) 376-7015 Website: www.tvcca.org

Towns Served: Bozrah, Colchester, East Lyme, Franklin, Griswold, Groton, Lebanon, Ledyard, Lisbon, Lyme, Montville, New London, North Stonington, Norwich, Old Lyme, Preston, Salem, Sprague, Stonington, Voluntown, and Waterford.

35

144 Clinton Street, New Britain, CT 06053 (860) 832-9438 www.cafca.org Facebook.com/CAFCANetwork Twitter @CAFCA_inc 36