14. Writing the Self- Study and Conducting a Successful Site Visit

10/20/14   Writing  the  Self-­‐Study  and   Conducting  a  Successful  Site  Visit     CAATE  Accreditation  Conference   October  17-­‐18,  2014   ...
Author: Angelica Morton
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10/20/14  

Writing  the  Self-­‐Study  and   Conducting  a  Successful  Site  Visit     CAATE  Accreditation  Conference   October  17-­‐18,  2014   Tampa,  FL     Paula  Maxwell,  Robin  Ploeger,  Greg  Frazer    

Topics  Covered   *  Preparing  the  Self-­‐study    Paula  Maxwell,  PhD,  ATC        

*  Conducting  a  Successful  Site  Visit    

 Robin  Ploeger,  EdD,  ATC    

   

*  Involving  Your  Administrators    Greg  Frazer,  PhD    

   

Preparing  the  Self-­‐Study  

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Mindset:     Opportunity  vs  Requirement     Consider  this  process  a  great  opportunity  …     *  To  showcase  your  program  and  its  unique  qualities   and  characteristics   *  To  complete  an  in-­‐depth  review  of  your  program     *  Identify  strengths     *  Identify  areas  that  can  be  enhanced   *  Identify  areas  that  may  be  lacking     *  Identify  opportunities  on  which  you  can              capitalize    

Before  You  Start  to  Write   *  Form  a  committee  to  assist   *  Establish  a  realistic  timeline     *  Allow  plenty  of  time   *  Plan  for  delays,  revisions,  approvals/signatures   *  Don’t  rush;  allow  time  to  check  the  details  (and  relieve  stress)  

*  Maintain  appropriate  records  throughout  the   accreditation  period;  don’t  wait  until  it  is  time  to  write   the  self-­‐study   *  Approach  the  process  positively  (i.e.  as  helpful                               to  the  program)  

Compiling  the  Self-­‐Study  

*  Involve  others;  don’t  work  in  isolation   *  *  *  *  * 

Administrators   Faculty   Preceptors   Students   Outside  members  

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Compiling  the  Self-­‐Study  

*  Provide  clear,  complete,  succinct  narratives   *  Answer  the  questions  completely     *  Avoid  straying  away  from  the  question   *  Provide  responses  that  can  be  understood  by  someone   not  familiar  with  your  program   *  Paint  a  clear  picture  of  your  program  

Compiling  the  Self-­‐Study  

*  Provide  a  comprehensive  overview  of  your  program   *  Detail  unique  aspects  of  your  program   *  Don’t  be  afraid  to  address  weaker  areas   *  Be  honest  in  your  reflections  and  information   *  The  process  is  meant  to  help  you/your  program   *  Identify  strengths  and  weaknesses  rather  than   “discovering  them”  during  the  site  visit  

Compiling  the  Self-­‐Study  

*  eAccreditation   *  Available  2  years  prior  to  due  date  (continuing  programs)   *  Initial:  as  soon  as  pay  fees  

*  “File  Cabinet”  –  storage  for  program  documents                        –  must  transfer  to  self-­‐study  module   *  Update  directory  and  documents   *  Upload  requested  information  for  each  standard   *  Name  files  according  to  their  content  

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Finalizing  the  Self-­‐Study   *  Recruit  an  outside  reviewer   *  Someone  outside  the  DISCIPLINE  is  helpful     *  Clarity   *  Grammar   *  Completeness    

*  Review  to  ensure  completeness   *  Organize  your  on-­‐site  files  as  you  write  the  self-­‐study   *  Submit  your  self-­‐study  on  time    

Remember  …     *  A  good  self  study  sets  a  great  tone  for  the  site                                   visit!  

Conducting  a  Successful  Site   Visit  

Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit  

*  Site  Visitors  are  looking  for  compliance   *  Purpose  –  Determine  compliance  with  standards  and   validate  the  self-­‐study   *  A  process  to  determine  what  the  program  is  doing  well   *  Site  Visit  Report  starts  with  strengths  of  the  program!  

*  Site  Visitors  don’t  make  accreditation  decisions   *  If  non-­‐compliances  are  found,  there  is  a  rejoinder   process   *  Most  site  visitors  are  program  personnel  and   understand  the  stress!  

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Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit   *  Work  with  the  Site  Visit  Chair   *  *  *  *  * 

Dates   Airports   Hotels   Ground  transportation   Agenda   *  3  day  agenda  –  CAATE  website  

*  Determine  clinical  sites  to  visit   *  Variety   *  Locations  

*  Selection  of  Students  

Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit  

*  Program  director  should  work  with  Site  Visit  Chair   during  initial  review  of  self-­‐study  on  eAccred   *  Site  visitors  may  need  clarification   *  Phone  calls   *  Emails   *  Through  eAccred  

*  If  a  standard  is  ‘reopened’,  program  director  can  upload   additional  documents     *  Questions  don’t  mean  non-­‐compliance!  

Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit   *  Prepare  program  personnel  -­‐  Communication   *  *  *  * 

Purpose  of  the  visit   Importance   What  to  expect   Prepare  for  potential  questions  

*  Stakeholders   *  *  *  *  * 

College  /  University  administrators   Faculty   Preceptors   Students   Administrative  Support  

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Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit   *  On-­‐site  Materials   *  See  list  from  CAATE   *  Update  documents  that  have  changed  since  the  self-­‐ study  was  submitted  

*  Internet  Access   *  For  eAccred  &  electronic  records  

*  Access  to  electronic  records   *  *  *  * 

E-­‐Value   ATrack   University  records   Online  course  platforms  

Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit   *  Other  preparations   *  Reserve  a  “hub”  for  site  visitors   *  A  secure  room  where  site  visitors  can  have  meetings,  store   on-­‐site  materials,  etc.  

*  Determine  other  meeting  locations,  i.e.  administrators   *  Travel  arrangements  

*  Visit  clinical  sites   *  Driving  time,  best  routes,  entrances,  permissions  to  enter   *  Do  a  ‘pre-­‐site  visit’  inspection  –  EAP,  BBP,  Therapeutic   equipment  calibrations  

Preparing  for  a  Site  Visit  

*  Other  preparations  cont.   *  Enlist  help  of  campus  personnel  –  IT,  dining,  secretarial,   etc.   *  Determine  dining  options   *  Campus  availability   *  Menus  

*  Site  Visitors  can’t  accept  gifts,  but  beverages  and  snacks   for  work  room  are  OK!   *  Ask  site  visitors  their  preferences  

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During  the  Site  Visit   *  Dinner  the  first  evening  with  site  visitors  and  program   administrators   *  Casual  conversation   *  Overview  of  program   *  Ensure  site  visitors  have  a  clear  picture  of  the  program  

*  Site  visitors  should  pay  for  their  own  meals  and  other   expenses   *  Institutions  pay  a  flat  fee  to  cover  costs  

During  the  Site  Visit  

*  Site  Visitors  will  debrief  the  program  director  daily   *  Will  discuss  potential  areas  of  non-­‐compliance   *  Don’t  want  any  surprises   *  Program  director  can  ask  questions  

*  Have  a  copy  of  the  Standards  for  Exit  conference   *  Take  notes  regarding  non-­‐compliances   *  Site  visitors  won’t  leave  any  written  report  

Involving  Your  Administrators  

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Deans  are  involved  centrally  in  issues   including:  

*  Setting  the  culture   *  Strategic  planning   *  Budget   *  Curriculum   *  Facilities   *  Research/scholarship    

*  External  relations   *  Fund  raising   *  Alumni  relations   *  Economic  development   *  Political  priorities  (federal   and  state)   *  Public  relations  

Roles  of  the  Dean   *  Deans  are  expected  to  support  and  promote  the  highest  quality   educational  programs,  research,  public  service,  and  economic   development  activities  of  their  respective  colleges  and  schools.     *  Each  dean  must  be  an  effective  champion  for  his/her  college,  both   within  the  University  and  externally.     *  Deans  have  ultimate  accountability  for  their  colleges’  sound   management  of  capital:  fiscal,  facilities,    and  human.     *  Deans  are  responsible  for  collegiate  planning,  including  alignment  of   plans  for  educational,  research,  and  other  activities                                                                     in  their  colleges.    

Deans  have  direct  responsibility  for:   *  Engaging  faculty,  staff,  and  students  in  discussions  of  all  important   collegiate  issues  and  assuring  a  positive,  high-­‐quality  working   environment;  convening  strategic  intellectual  discussions  about  future   academic  directions  of  departments,  centers,  programs,  and  the   college  itself.   *  Advocating  for  the  College,  especially  by  joining  the  university-­‐wide   processes  in  strategic  planning,  budget,  facilities  planning,  and  political   action,  to  position  the  College  favorably  in  the  University’s  broader   planning.   *  Raising  private  funds  for  scholarships,  professorships,  programs,   facilities,  and  other  College  needs,  normally  spending                                                             40%  of  his/her  time  on  such  activities.  

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Deans  have  direct  responsibility  for:   *  Playing  a  key  oversight  role  in  accreditation,  program  review,  and  other   processes  that  are  important  for  continuous  improvement  of  the  College’s   activities.   *  Engaging  with  the  Deans’  Council  in  key  discussions  of  institutional   planning,  policy,  political  action,  and  other  key  activities,  in  so  doing   representing  the  College’s  interests  effectively.   *  Hiring  highly  effective  chairs,  directors,  staff  and  others  who  are  direct   reports,  doing  their  performance  evaluations,  and  assuring  their   accountability  for  high-­‐level  performance  in  areas  appropriate  to  their   positions.   *  Assuring  coordination  of  all  components  of  the  College—departments,   centers,  academic  programs  (including  undergraduate,  graduate  and   professional),  economic  development  activities,  public  and                                                           other  activities  of  the  unit.  

The  ultimate  goal  of  any  academic  program  in   health  professions  education  is  to  prepare  the   highest  quality  graduate  (safe  and  competent)   for  practice  today  and  tomorrow.  Every   activity,  course,  admission  decision,  clinical  site   selection,  and  evaluation  is  driven  by  that  goal.   Accreditation  has  to  be  one  of  the  ultimate   measures  of  quality.      

    Mary  Collins  (1997)  stated  that  accreditation  reminded   her  of  the  Alan  Arkin  film,  The  Russians  Are  Coming,  The   Russians  Are  Coming.  Anxiety  and  concern  over  the   production  of  a  document  called  the  self  study  only  led   to  a  visit  by  real  people.  “As  they  approached  the   school,  anxiety  led  to  panic  and  the  most  unusual   activities  from  cleaning,  straightening,  and  power   dressing  to  concern,  self-­‐doubt,  and  feelings  of   inadequacies  emerged.  It  was  the  fear  of  the  unknown   that  led  to  a  sense  of  confusion  and  conflicting   messages.”  

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Accreditation  should:   •  Facilitate  an  alliance  of  interest  groups   •  Build  and  develop  programs  without   redundancy  or  loss  of  resources     •  Remove  confusion  of  disparate  standards   where  efficiency,  efficacy,  and  clarity  of   purpose  will  flow  from  consistent  quality   indices.  

Top  10  Myths  of  Accreditation   #10.     Not  providing  detailed  directions  to  the  building  where   the     accreditation  visit  will  occur  or  providing  a  parking  pass   puts  your  visitors  in  a  good  frame  of  mind    

#9.  Not  providing  breaks  and  a  lunch  period  in  the  daily   schedule  of  the  accreditation  visit  puts  your  visitors  in  a  good   frame  of  mind    

#8.  Walking  your  visitors  around  your  campus  so  that  every   meeting  is  in  a  different  location  puts  your  visitors  in  a  good   frame  of  mind  

Top  10  Myths  of  Accreditation   #7.       Not  providing  umbrellas  or  covered  transportation  to  the   next  meeting  (refer  to  #8)  on  bad  weather  days  puts  your   visitors  in  a  good  frame  of  mind             #6.  Showing  up  late  for  appointments  or  having  university   officials  who  make  the  visitors  wait  puts  your  visitors  in  a  good   frame  of  mind    

#5.  Not  having  on-­‐site  materials  available,  organized,   referenced,  or  prepared  puts  your  visitors  in  a  good  frame  of   mind    

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Top  10  Myths  of  Accreditation   #4.       Having  faculty  or  staff  who  do  not  value  specialized  

accreditation,  embrace  the  conspiracy  theory  of  peer  review,   and  reluctantly  provide  curt,  abrupt  or  incomplete  answers  to   questions  puts  your  visitors  in  a  good  frame  of  mind         #3.  Having  your  visitors  take  time  to  determine  what   restaurants  serve  your  campus,  identify  e-­‐menus,  place  an   order  and  then  having  to  go  get  the  food  puts  your  visitors  in  a   good  frame  of  mind     PS—your  mother  always  taught  you  to  be  hospitable     and  have  water,  coffee  and  soda  on  hand  for  guests!  

 

Top  10  Myths  of  Accreditation    

#2.     Having  a  self-­‐study  that  consumes  five  4-­‐inch  binders  with   no  page  numbers  or  table  of  contents  puts  your  visitors  in  a   good  frame  of  mind       #2A.  Having  five  4-­‐inch  binders  with  insufficient,  non-­‐dedicated   work  space  to  open  the  documents  puts  your  visitors  in  a   good  frame  of  mind     and  the  #1  Myth  of  Accreditation  …    

Top  10  Myths  of  Accreditation      

#1.  TELLING  the  visitors  that  you  answered  that   question  in  the  text  so  obviously  they  did  not  read   the  documents  submitted  and  are  not  prepared  puts   your  visitors  in  a  good  frame  of  mind      

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Questions  or  Thoughts?  

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