Winter 2009-10

Mentoring Arrangers –

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n September 2009, I was invited to judge the Buckeye District Rose Show in Columbus, Ohio. It is always an honor to judge a District or National Arrangement Section of a Convention. After the initial invitation, I was also asked if I would take part in a Mentoring Program. Now this was an added bonus. As an Arrangement Judge and Dis tri ct Arrangem ent Chairperson for some years, it is always a delight to be asked to share some of my knowledge with those that are just beginning to do arrangements for show.

by Lillian E. Walsh Schenectady, NY Member National Arrangement Committee photos courtesy of Lillian Walsh

group of people who were there to attend the SHOOT OUT of JUDGES. I joked that I forgot my six-gun! That was quickly laughed away. Set up in front of the group were three cocktail tables, high enough that the audience could see all that we were going to show them. Each was draped with white cloth; one for each of us to work upon. (No guns in sight— YET!)

Lauren Toth of Arizona, chose lovely red roses to define and execute In the Oriental Manner of design. Carol Robertson of Texas, chose Pink blended roses to use in a Modern Design. It was my choice of Pink roses, to explain and display the Traditional way of using roses in design. We chose our roses, line and filler materials. At that point we were introduced to the audience and our mentor Cont’d on p. 5

After judging a well written innovative schedule for the Columbus group, we were fed a grand lunch. That was to enable us to tackle the afternoon‘s activities As we, Lauren Toth, Carol Robertson and I, entered the program area, the most gratifying experience was to see the large Lauren Toth, Lillian Walsh and Carol Robertson with their arrangements

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RAB - Winter 2009/10

ARS Arrangement Committee 2009-2012 Sandy Dixon

Marlene Marolf

Chair of Arrangement Judges 6181 Deepwood Dr. E. Jacksonville, FL 32244-2621 904-778-2887, cell 904-521-6274, fax 904-573-6966 [email protected]

Region 5 2604 W. 46th St. Davenport, IA 52806-5014 563-391-9621 [email protected]

Lew Shupe

Diane M. Schrift

Assoc. Chair of Arrangement Judges 1343 Sunset Dr. Fairborn, OH 45324-5649 937-878-0479 [email protected]

N area of Regions 4 and 6 2419 Yorkshire Rd., Birmingham, MI 48009-7557 248-649-6161 [email protected]

Jim Harrell

Judy Mayo

Editor, Rose Arranger’s Bulletin 121 Shore Rush Cir., St. Simons Island, GA 31522-1420 912-634-0323, cell 912-617-1453 [email protected]

S area of Region 7 1605 Enterprise Blvd. Lake Charles, LA 70601-6365 337-433-0086, cell 337-794-5374 [email protected]

Lillian E. Walsh

Norma Hedrick-Whitehead

NE Region 0 and Region 1 838 Main Ave. Schenectady, NY 12303-1130 518-372-0920 [email protected]

N area of Region 7 and S area of Region 6 4200 N. Spruce Ave. Broken Arrow, OK 74012-0456 918-286-8244 [email protected]

Martha ‘Marti’ Youmans

Carol Macon

SW Region 0 and Region 2 120 Liberty Dr. Yorktown, VA 23693-4636 757-867-5566 [email protected]

Region 8 115 Glencrest Ct. Colorado Springs, CO 80906-4481 719-576-7626 [email protected]

Lee Hale

Marylou Coffman

Region 3 174 Lee Maddox Rd. Jackson, GA 30233-5828 770-775-6381, cell 404-408-1938 [email protected]

SW area of Regions 8 and 9 213 N. Riata St. Gilbert, AZ 85234-6428 hm. & fax 480-926-3064, cell 602-377-7613 [email protected]

Gary Barlow

Jo Martin

Region 4 1343 Sunset Dr. Fairborn, OH 45324-5649 937-878-9913 [email protected]

Region 9 1801 N. Bristol St. Tacoma, WA 98406-2510 253-752-5857 [email protected]

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From the Editor’s Desk beautiful arrangements is its own reward, but perhaps the greatest reward is sharing that knowledge with others to help them learn those skills.

When I accepted the request to assume the editorship of the RAB, I did not initially reflect on the responsibility to come up with a topic or theme for each issue. Then I realized - I needed to come up with a theme for my first issue!

So, I need articles and PICTURES (see p. 15 about pictures), for the upcoming issues. I have set themes for the next three issues (see p. 5) with some possible article topics. If you see a topic of interest to you, let me know. If you have another approach to the general subject – go for it. Beyond that I am open to suggestions.

Where to start?? The beginning, of course, is best. What constitutes the most important element to keep our hobby going – the beginners! While some of our arrangement exhibitors came into rose arranging with experience from other arranging venues, Garden Club, Ikebana Class etc., many of our exhibitors were rosarians first and became interested in arranging only with coaxing and encouragement from their peers who were already involved in exhibiting rose arrangements. I know that was my experience. Everyone in my local society who has become interested in arranging since I did, started that way too.

In closing, I would be remiss if I didn‘t thank Diane Schrift, your out-going editor. Diane has done a terrific job updating the RAB format to a 21st century on-line publication. I hope I can continue to provide interesting and instructive material to you during my tenure as editor.

So for my first issue, I conferred with our new National Chairman, Sandy Dixon and we set out to find articles that focus on beginners – How to find them; how to pique their interest; how to bring them along; how to help them avoid some of the mistakes we made. Being a ―beginner‖ myself, as the new editor of the ―RAB‖, I didn‘t have articles submitted to cover all the topics so I went back to a couple of earlier editions to get some of the material – a ―blast from the past‖ so to speak, but still relevant.

Table of Contents Mentoring Arrangers………………………………………...……1 ARS Arrangement Committee…….….....…………...………….2 From the Editor’s Desk …………..…….………………..…….3 The Walls have Ears! ...…………...….……………………..….. 4 RAB Themes for 2010....……………….…..…………….……...5

With this issue the RAB will complete 26 years of providing both beginning and experienced rose arrangers with a wealth of information to help them improve their skills and share their experiences. This is YOUR publication. As editor, my duty is to select and organize material provided to me and present it in an attractive way – nothing more. The content is only as good as what I receive. For those of you who are talented and experienced arrangers and teachers, it is imperative that you pass along this knowledge to keep our craft alive. Acquiring the ability to create

This and That …………………………………………………….6 Postcards from Palm Springs….…………....……………….….9 Arrangements as a Beginner...……...………………………..13 Doing Arrangements Simply ..…...……...…………….……… 14 Penn Jersey Seminar Report...……...…….…...………...…...16 Pictures Please……………………..………….…….………….17 Rose Show Results...…..…………………….…….…………..18 National Challenge Winners…..…...…..………………………22 Planet Roses…...…………….………………………………….23 Upcoming Events…...……………..……………………………23

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ourselves. Judges should write comments. So bring your pen and paper, too.

JUDGES ..... THE WALLS HAVE EARS!

While judges deliberate over an arrangement, the best judges use correct terminology. It is not subjective. You and your team members are on the same wavelength. The ―walls‖ are startled to hear a judge declare, ―Well, what a mess that is!‖ Remember the words: ―Balance is affected by position of red rose .... ―

by Jo Martin Tacoma, Washington Member National Arrangement Committee

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ometimes it seems that the topic of ethics is glossed over in our rose arrangement schools. Perhaps a half-hour is devoted to the topic. Judges are then to go their way conducting themselves in the most decorous manner. Perhaps more time should be spent evaluating our demeanor. Of course, we never see ―ourselves‖ in the less than flattering light, do we? Each of us probably could write a very concise list of ―dos and don‘ts‖ in the area of judge‘s ethics. Most judges can stop reading this little reminder now. Go on with your life; have a latté and grow those roses. For the rest who are still with me here, let‘s examine a few areas of judging ethics.

And last of all, if the shoes you wore for the first time are beginning to pinch after three hours on the show floor, please don‘t ―snap‖ at the clerks. They are human; they are volunteers; and they think we are very grand folks. Let‘s not burst their bubbles. Happy Judging! From the Fall 2001 issue of the RAB, Kreg Hill, editor

It is always hoped that those judges who have been invited to judge a rose arrangements division will come prepared. They have read the schedule; they are wearing their judging badges; and they have on comfortable shoes. They approach the arrangements ―seeking the beauty first.‖ As we have been told so many times: ―There is no ugly arrangement.‖ However, now and then, along with the comfortable shoes, we bring our negative attitudes. Offside remarks are heard by clerks, the public, and who knows who else when shows are held in public places. ―Worst show I have ever seen!‖ or ―Haven‘t these people had lessons?‖ Judges come off as arrogant and aloof.

Check It Out The Fall 2009 Issue of the Mini & Miniflora Bulletin has an excellent collection of photographs by Tom Mayhew of the Arrangement Winners at the 2009 National All-Mini Rose Show in Pennsylvania on Pages 16-20 .

Another area where ―some‖ judges falter is in their reluctance to put written comments on those arrangements that do not get first place ribbons. A responsible judge carries a pad of Post-it Notes so he/she can put a constructive comment as well as an encouraging one. It need not be lengthy, but it means so much to the exhibitor. Remember, if we drive away all of the exhibitors, we will be left looking at

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Mentoring...Cont’d from pg. 1

seeking candidates. Each of these people had some experience, without a great deal of success in the shows they had entered previously. They were at this program to LEARN. (Later they each said how it has enabled them to go forward in rose design.)

we can reach the public without going to an extreme or major expense. Two or three other judges, and some of the program spectators at the Columbus Convention came up to me later, thanking me for making myself available to explain some of the things judges are looking for, and how to start arranging the basic designs. It was very nice to be told that our activity had been well received. I would also be remiss if I did not say that our past National Chair of Arrangement Judges, Dr. Lewis Shupe was the Major Mentor for this good program. If anyone has questions, I am confident he would be willing to explain in more detail. He c a n b e c o n t a ct e d a t : 9 37 - 8 78 - 0 47 9 [email protected]

These ladies had chosen each of us to explain what they were not doing to entice the judge to award them more highly. Each mentor was given time to explain the rudiments of their chosen type of design. The ―student‖ that stood by me, had never worked with a needlepoint. She had some ―florist‖ experience, using only Oasis. Using a square tall container with a needlepoint near the top

RAB Themes for 2010 These are focus areas I have chosen for this year. Each is followed by some possible topics for articles. Some are instructive, some are controversial. Our art is always evolving and YOUR publication needs to stimulate you. The content is driven by what you can provide. Arrangers are creative people - surprise me!

Lillian and Carol’s Demonstration Arrangements

Spring: Miniature Designs – Share your tips and tricks for working with small materials; Scale and Proportion, the heart and soul of a good miniature design; favorite companion plants for line and filler material for miniature designs; Miniflora – what is their influence on judging miniature designs. Summer: A focus on Traditional Designs - Ways to spice up the division by using color backgrounds and unusual line and filler materials; the mechanics of traditional designs - making difficult containers work for a traditional design that requires a lot of material. Is there a place for a "Contemporary Division" somewhere between Traditional and Modern?

of the interior, we proceeded to review how to insert stems for placement. Working from the back of the container, we built a Line Mass design. Each of the other mentors did the same with their ‗student‘. Each mentor explained as they worked and when finished, asked their ‗student‘ to explain what they had learned.

Fall: Modern Designs, exploring tips, tricks and mechanics of unusual design types with specific requirements such as underwater, mobile, hanging, transparency etc.

As an Arrangement Judge and Rose Design Educator, I think that this is a good way in which

Winter: Arrangers Choice….. any suggestions????

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change as it impacts arrangers and rose shows. It is possible that the new committee will suggest a substitution for the new ARS Executive Board‘s approval as soon as the Spring National Convention in Shreveport at the end of April. For now, add a page with the new description of ‗novice‘ to your Guidelines after page 52 (52B). Then, if there is another change, you merely need to replace that page. This suggests that a statement be added to your arrangement schedules that exhibitors should check with the Show Chair of Arrangements before entering this class. That way, the Chair can review with each exhibitor the new requirement. We know that not every exhibitor has purchased the new Guidelines, let alone checked the website or this column for updates. We are confident that all judges now have the new ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Arrangements so they are judging shows correctly.

This and That From the National Chair of Arrangement Judges

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s the Good Witch directed Dorothy to follow the yellow brick road, it‘s always best to start at the beginning. Therefore, you‘ll notice that our first issue of the Rose Arranger’s Bulletin (RAB) is focused on beginning – as a novice arranger, apprentice arrangement judge or new chair of arrangement judges. At whatever experience level, it never hurts to review or simply to place oneself in the other person‘s shoes. All of us, judges especially, should be sensitive to the beginner. Changes that impact rose shows: At the Palm Springs National Conference in November, former ARS Chair of Arrangements, Douglas Helberg, ended his term of three years with the promotion and subsequent passage of two items by the former ARS Executive Board. The first item was a housekeeping item and the other was a change in the ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Arrangements.

Considerations for action: We need a discussion on whether to provide two types of Traditional designs – Classical and Contemporary. Many of us have seen designs with traditional placement of materials that contain abstracted plant materials as the secondary materials in the design. In those cases, we have simply penalized the designs for being too modern in appearance and taken the points off on the Scorecard under Conformance to type of design. If those same designs were placed in a Modern class, they would suffer from traditional placement of materials and would lose points under Conformance. May we create a category for these designs so they are appreciated and treated as successes?

The Junior Award, which is a rosette, has/had a ribbon with the word ‗Royalty‘ on it. The award is correctly described in the 2006 revision of the Guidelines and therefore only the rosettes in inventory needed changing. All new rosettes ordered will be delivered in corrected form. Therefore, if anyone has not yet purchased the new Guidelines, they may not be aware that it is no longer the Junior Royalty Award. If you have one of the older rosettes, please carefully remove that part of the rosette with the word, Royalty, before presenting it at your rose show.

There is talk of deleting several of the Modern design types mentioned in the Guidelines that do not lend themselves very easily to rose shows. Those that immediately come to mind are botanical designs, collages, duo designs, still life and/or vibratile designs. If you have experience with these or other of the newer designs, please let us know your feelings. Several types were added to the Guidelines after the Federated Garden Clubs changed their Handbook and there was insufficient time to evaluate

Also passed was a change in the definition of ‗novice‘ as it applies to winning the Novice Award. Eligible exhibitors for that award are now exhibitors who have never won an ARS Gold, Silver or Bronze Medal Certificate. The new ARS Arrangement Committee will be assessing this

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their suitability to rose arrangements for rose shows. More designs have recently been added to their Handbook. If there are additional design types you feel are suitable to be added to our Guidelines, please let us know.

curtains, etc.). The background and underlay, upon which the arrangement/exhibit is placed, is the responsibility of the exhibitor and is judged as such. A certain amount of understanding should be exercised in the case of novices and junior arrangers.

Notes of clarification:

Miniature exhibition table classes are wide open with respect to staging size. You may severely restrict them in size or allow a staging space of sufficient size that a rose arrangement unit of 10 inches in width or height is in pleasing proportion to the exhibit/design as a whole. It is OK to allow a staging of 24 inches, for instance, as width for a miniature exhibition table. Please allow a suitable depth as well. There should also be a statement that there is no height restriction. Remember, not all dishes for miniature tables are tiny. Having 24 inches for staging does not require the exhibitor to use it all. They may enter an exhibit much smaller than the maximum space provided. This is where niches/backgrounds help define the area of the exhibit. Judges should not penalize an exhibit for unused staging space, provided that the exhibit space is defined appropriately. An exhibit that appears crowded with respect to the allotted staging, however, may suffer loss of points based on the degree of distraction. It is the exhibitor‘s choice of how much of the allotted space they choose to use. Imagine the fun in entering one of these, let alone judging it. As always, an exhibit/arrangement that exceeds its allotted space, is penalized. If that exhibit/arrangement interferes with the appearance of another exhibit/arrangement, it is penalized more heavily. The arrangement/exhibit that suffers from such encroachment should not be penalized. Show Chairs should attempt to prevent such encroachment with timely coaching.

The rule of thumb for all judges is that we give the benefit of the doubt to the arranger. Never disqualify or penalize an arrangement unless you are sure that the arrangement is in violation of the Guidelines or the show schedule rules which should include the Scorecard. (Please remember that Creativity and Expressiveness is now 15 points and Conformance is now 15 points.) Please note that Traditional design is not synonymous with all fresh plant material. If you offer a Royalty Award with only one class in competition for it, allow the arranger to choose either fresh and/or dried secondary plant materials. If you have two or more classes competing for it, you may restrict one of the classes to all fresh materials. There seems to be a need for clarification as to the staging allowances for miniature arrangements and miniature exhibition tables. Let‘s all try to get on the same page with this. The miniature rose arrangement unit itself is the only component that may not exceed 10 inches in height, width or depth. You may provide 12 or more inches width and depth for the staging, to which the exhibitor may add a background, niche, etc. of such size as to exceed 10 inches, but be in pleasing proportion to the arrangement. The only things that are judged with respect to the background are its condition, color impact with regard to the entire design and the degree to which the design is pleasingly framed. A background that is too tall or not wide enough, etc. is cause for penalization. In the case of arrangements in the Oriental manner, a statement in the schedule that the arrangement need not fill the niche, is customary, and should be noted by exhibitor and judge. Failure to use a background may also cause loss of points depending on the degree of distraction of existing staging colors and conditions (walls,

Upcoming Judging Schools and Seminars in 2010: The Pacific Southwest District is hosting a Seminar on Modern Design, March 13th, at the Ventura County Fairgrounds, Ventura, CA. Audit credit for existing judges will be given. Contact Marylou Coffman, District Chair of Arrangements, [email protected], 480-926-3064.

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On Friday, May 21st, the Deep South District will hold its Arrangement Judging School in Lake City, FL. Candidates to take the test to become Apprentice Judges will be tested Friday Evening. A Horticulture Judging School is being held on Saturday. Contact Jim Harrell, District Chair of Arrangements, [email protected], 912-634-0323.

Due to the enormous numbers of requests, another Ikebana workshop will be provided in Shreveport. If you didn‘t get out to California, you won‘t want to miss this. In fact, they are offering a beginner‘s workshop as well as one for advanced arrangers. Tell everyone you know who is interested in arranging to be in Shreveport at the end of Aprilbeginning of May.

Central District is hosting an Arrangement Judging School, September 18th and 19th. This school is being held in conjunction with the Central District Convention and Rose Show in Wichita, Kansas. Contact Wanda Weirich, District Chair of Arrangements, [email protected], 636-239-7380.

Just to let you know, the ARS National Convention in Atlanta this coming October, will feature an arrangement workshop in Modern Designs. This is a good time to make requests for future workshops/ seminars. Tell us what you want and need to be more comfortable in your judging skills and your exhibiting.

Those wishing to improve their knowledge of arranging and learn what judges expect to see in blue ribbon level arrangements are welcome. Cost for taking the judge‘s exam is $10 (recently reduced from $50). It is an open book test and applicants are responsible for obtaining the ARS Guidelines for Judging Rose Arrangements ($15 + the usual fees), available from ARS Headquarters, www.ars.org. Audit of an approved arrangement judging school or seminar is required for all judges every 4 years. It is not unusual to see all your district judges every other year at your judging school in order to prevent losing accreditation due to unforeseen conflicts. This way, you always have at least 2 years of accreditation left and your sanity preserved.

The rose show in Palm Springs was fantastic. An extremely large number of arrangements gave the eyes a feast. Our congratulations go to all who exhibited. We also thank Doug Helberg, former ARS Chair of Arrangements, for his good will and service to ARS on our behalf. Subcommittee on Youth: If you are working with young people (17 years and younger), teaching them to arrange roses, please contact our new Subcommittee on Youth. Marylou Coffman, Marilyn Wellan and Joanne Maxheimer have all agreed to serve as part of an effort to encourage and recognize young arrangers. We would love to know how you are doing with those efforts and what suggestions you could give others.

Congratulations: For those of you who were fortunate enough to be with us in Palm Springs for the 2-day Ikebana workshop, you know what a huge success it was. Our thanks go to the highly talented instructors, Lew Shupe, Gary Barlow, Lee Hale, Carol Macon, Bill Christensen and Barbara Gordon. Thanks also to Marilyn Wellan for assisting and lending her talents. A special thank you goes to Kreg Hill and the entire crew of the Conference for providing the extensive materials required for such an undertaking. Everyone will benefit as we go forward to teach others. About 75% of the participants were judges. We all felt much more capable in our creation and judging of arrangements in the Oriental Manner.

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This new role reminds me that I‘m not ‗in Kansas anymore‘. But just like Dorothy and Toto found, after all the traveling to strange and possibly scary places, there‘s no place like home. So, I‘ll grow my roses, just like all of you. I‘ll sit down on rare occasions, and smell them. There‘s always another rose show. Good luck.

Sandy Dixon ARS Chair of Arrangements -8-

Postcards from Palm Springs by Barbara Olive Bartlett, TN

Photos by Bobbie Reed unless noted

Moribana Sogetsu

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recently had the pleasure of attending the postpeople to use during the workshop. I found out near convention Ikebana workshop held in Palm the end of the workshop that he had actually made Springs, California. Many of you may be unaware many of his containers. In short, the attendees had a that a small group has been working for several years huge selection of containers to work with. to develop the IARS (Ikebana of the American Rose The workshop began with an overview of the four Society) and Palm Springs saw their work come to most common Ikebana ―schools‖: Ikenobo, O‘Hara, reality. Lew Shupe, Gary Barlow, Lee Hale, Sandy Ichiyo and Sogetsu. Since the American Rose Dixon, Marilyn Wellan, Bill Christenson, Carol Society has arrangements ―in the Oriental manner‖, Macon, Kreg Hill and Barbara Gordon planned this it does not strictly follow any one school. There are workshop as an introduction four principles of oriental to the IARS. They made the design: freshness, motion, two day event fun as well as balance and harmony. educational. I am not only Remember that freshness may grateful that I was able to refer to the freshness of the attend this wonderful design as a whole. (Minimal) workshop but that I was also damage to plant material (but able to bring containers for not the rose itself) is sale. In addition, Lew and acceptable and may even be Gary had a good supply of desirable when it is used to containers (imported from symbolize aging. We most Japan, no less) for sale. Kreg commonly see this in our fall Hill also had a good variety shows when the themes often of containers available for Lew , Gary & Lee demonstrate a technique

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reflect the end of the growing season and winter‘s approach.

styles are a contemporary expression of rikka and shoka, scaled down, simpler and using fewer materials.

There are three types of oriental style arrangements most commonly seen in our ARS shows: moribana, nageire and free-style. In addition to these it is quite probable that we will begin seeing both rikka shimputai and shoka shimputai type designs in the near future. Many of us are slightly familiar with rikka and shoka styles to the extent that we know that they incorporate a lot of plant material and flowers, usually much more than the Moribana Ikenobo average ARS arranger would take on. The shimputai versions of these

Ohara Hana Mai

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―The hallmark of oriental arranging is the use of space‖ according to Carol Macon. The successful arranger knows how to use and balance both positive and negative space. Plant material should be used to ―frame‖ the design. Marilyn made a stunning moribana design using curved branches of pine enclosing the space where the roses were. Her design also illustrated an emerging trend of the use of more and heavier plant material. We were once taught that there should be virtually nothing in an oriental design other than the line material and flowers and, even

Sandy discusses a design

photo by Sandy Dixon

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Lee Hale and an Ichiyo Free Style composition

material and/or flowers be added to the rear of the container to create depth and draw the eye through the design. I found it particularly interesting that the vast majority of the attendees (at least 75%) were judges. Our discussions proved that there is a great deal of incorrect information that we as judges have followed through the years. Some of the information is simply incorrect whereas some changes as attitudes, styles, trends and judging standards change.

then, it was desirable that much of the foliage be removed. Simplicity is still a feature of oriental designs but they are no longer as sparse as they once were. It is also recommended that plant

One common source of confusion involves containers for oriental arrangements. There is no rule that says that an oriental container cannot be a ―modern‖ type container. One of the instructors discussed how a moribana arrangement that she entered in a show was severely penalized because the containers were deemed ―too modern‖. She had the containers with her. They were three shallow containers, glossy and brightly colored. Although these containers may have been inappropriate for a design that the arranger wanted to convey a sense of age or tradition or tranquility, they are not inherently ―wrong‖ for oriental designs. Also we are accustomed to seeing moribana designs in low

Karen Radde works on a hands on project

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There are some guidelines to oriental style arrangements that really do seem to be rules. One of these is that four is a bad number. In oriental tradition, four is symbolic of many things and apparently they are all bad. It most commonly symbolizes death. Although we commonly see the use of three roses/flowers, this is not required. One, two or more may be used but never four. You should also check to make certain that you do not have four lines, for example, three pieces of bamboo and one flower. It became apparent that four of anything was really a huge no-no. Another is that it is unacceptable to have anything visible in the water. We most often think of this in terms of moribana arrangements since the visibility of the water is such an integral part of the arrangement. Of course plant material may fall into the water after you have placed the design, but every effort should be made to ensure that the water is free of debris. Also plant material may not hang into the water. In moribana arrangements plant materials are not allowed to touch the rim of the container, either.

bowls, or suibans. Compotes also make wonderful vessels for moribana. The base or pedestal of the compote seems to be what give us judges trouble. The container is still a low, shallow one, it is simply on a base. It seems that, at least where containers are concerned, we as judges need to be more flexible.

The goal is that workshops such as the one in Palm Springs will become a regular feature on both the national and district levels. I have repeatedly heard arrangements judges say that they feel most inadequate in judging the oriental style designs. Workshops such as this one will help address this problem as well as familiarizing us with emerging trends. The Spring 2010 National in Shreveport is scheduled to be the setting for the next meeting of the IARS group. I hope the small amount of information that I have provided will make you want to be a part of this as well as future workshops and that it will help you with your arrangements and judging.

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Arrangements as a Beginner

make cuts that look like leaf edges. It‘s also fun to look for odd plants and foliage to use, but it is important to make sure they hold up when cut and don‘t wilt too quickly.

by Jean Stream Micanopy, FL

Where do we begin as ARS Arrangement Novices? Most arrangers, including myself, usually start out with buckets full of flowers and lots of greenery for filler. Beginners as well usually select their most ―attractive‖ vases and of course we bring several to shows, just in case. It is sort of like getting ready for vacation – pack and take as much as you can, just in case. This philosophy, we soon learn, only leads to frustration. Our flowers get bruised, our greenery gets tangled and wilts, and we soon realize we hardly know where to start or what to start with.

Lastly, think about the class theme to see if you can enhance your arrangement by the use of color or textures. Many schedules don‘t allow for the use of accessories, so it is more important to concentrate on your overall design rather than to accessorize the arrangement to support the theme. Thinking ―Lean & Mean‖ really implies keeping your arrangement simple. A ―Lean‖ arrangement is one that looks uncluttered and not ―frilly.‖ The roses will beg you to look at them and when looking at the roses, your eye will be slightly drawn to your filler and then gently drawn to your container. The ―Mean‖ comes into play during construction. Mean what you do as you place each item. Think ahead before placing anything. Look for the flower that will be your focal point, how long it needs to be and where it needs to be placed. Poking too many holes into your oasis will cause the arrangement to be unstable and the flowers will tend to move around.

I have found that thinking ―Lean and Mean‖ is so much easier and will get us rewards we thought never possible. The first step is to review the Show Arrangement Schedule to see which class or classes you might want to enter. Next, select an appropriate vase or container for each class. Keep in mind when selecting your vases or containers, you want them to complement the design, blend in or disappear, so stay away from shiny or elaborately painted ones. As you become more experienced you will soon learn that ―junk‖ containers work best. Knowing this can make looking for new containers an adventure.

Once you have all this organized you will need to make sure you have the mechanical items to use during construction. Clean containers, wire, floral clay, tape, picks, oasis, scissors, wire cutters, cleaning cloth and maybe a few floral picks. These picks can come in handy if you need to use a flower with a stem that is too short. Remember mechanics are to aid in your construction and need to be used in a fashion that they are not clearly visible. The hardest thing I find to master is anchoring the oasis in the container. Floral tape, either green or clear, works best. Be sure your container is dry; otherwise the tape will not stick. This tape ages quickly and needs to be replaced regularly. Michaels‘ Craft stores are a good source for most of these items.

You then think about your roses, line material and filler. Always remember the Rose needs to dominate any ARS arrangement. While line material and/or filler is important, many arrangements can be beautiful with just rose foliage as filler. The roses should be fresh, well groomed and in proper scale for the container. Often this requires removing some of the petals to get them sized and cleaned up. It helps to be creative with your filler. Look for colors that will compliment or bring out the color in your roses. Smaller leaf plants are much easier and more effective in miniature arrangements. Don‘t forget you can trim leaves if they are too large. This is kind of fun with the craft scissors which

Arrangements add a great deal of beauty to any rose show. I would encourage you to try your hand at ―Lean & Mean‖. That‘s what I‘ve found works best for me.

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RAB - Winter 2009/10

Doing Arrangements Simply ... From the VERY Beginning by Gary Barlow Fairborn, OH Member National Arrangement Committee

A

ny experienced arranger knows the joy of creating artistically, and the feeling of fulfillment when a planned design comes to fruition. Planning for a particular design - a large traditional mass design, for example - takes foresight and preparation in order to collect a good grouping of roses, foliage and other flowers, the right size and shape of container, the proper mechanics and so on. The arranger learns the necessary steps in this phase of systematic preplanning.

The key is simplicity. We must keep the initial information on a basic level for the novice arranger. Once the basics are understood, then more complexity can be introduced at a later time.

Arrangers also benefit from, and take pleasure in, those experiences of spontaneous creating when, after experimenting with roses, foliage and other materials, a design begins to emerge from this initial chaos of colors, textures, patterns and shapes. This is where the art of designing comes into play.

In my local society, a plan was initiated to get all people beyond the ―fear level,‖ to give each person time to ―get comfortable‖ with the idea of rose arranging, and finally to get each person involved in the ―hands-on‖ activity of completing an artistic arrangement. The ―sharing‖ portion was planned to help everyone become more knowledgeable about arrangements such as Traditional, Modern and Oriental, so that they could more fully appreciate the artistic sections in shows. The ―teaching‖ portion of the plan was to get each member involved in creating an arrangement; this involved simple, basic preliminary work, and with no competitive aspect involved. The plan was to have everyone begin on the same level, to experiment and to design an arrangement that could be taken home at the end of the evening‘s session. A goal was to have fun creating, as well as to gain some basic knowledge about the elements and principles of design and the structural mechanics involved, as well as learning more about various types of foliage and natural materials.

It is, however, often a challenge for a person who has never designed and built an arrangement to feel comfortable in doing one. To some people, it may seem overwhelming: there are too many roses, a container that is too tall or too short, and too much foliage. ―I can‘t do it‖ or ―I‘m not creative‖ are statements that are often heard as responses to a motivation for rose arranging.

The Arranger as Teacher

The teacher‘s enthusiasm must also be communicated. If this is done, then the recipient becomes more comfortable in starting on this journey of learning to create, and of understanding good design and making effective arrangements.

A Beginning for Beginners

When the experienced arranger shares information about designing, and communicates the excitement about creating, then he/she becomes a teacher. If the aspects of planned designs and spontaneous working are understood and appreciated, then these At a society meeting, a discussion ensued relative concepts can be taught and experiences can be to what materials to bring to the next meeting, how shared so that both planning and spontaneity are the session would be approached, what kind of understood and accepted by the novice arranger. RAB - Winter 2009/10 -14-

assistance would be available, and other items that allayed fears and helped them be more comfortable with the idea. The one point that I continued to emphasize, however, was that everyone would be creating an arrangement. Careful, simple explanations and helpful answers are essential in this ―preparation process.‖ The teacher must identify the level that the students are on, and work from there; I knew that all of our members were familiar in seeing all classes and types of arrangements in our rose shows, but few had designed an arrangement. Now they were being prepared to take the next step. With these goals in mind, a Plan Sheet was handed out to prepare them for basic arrangements that would be done the following month. The handout was presented as follows:

(Note: if you have your own Oasis in the container, this can be used; otherwise, Oasis will be supplied). 1. Flower or Garden Scissors (one per person) 2. Bucket for flowers (can be shared per couple) 3. Table Cover (newspaper, cloth, etc.) 4. Cleanup supplies (paper towels, sponge, etc.)

Items for the March meeting:

NOTE: EACH PERSON WILL DESIGN AN ARRANGEMENT, SO EVEYONE SHOULD COME PREPARED WITH ABOVE SUPPLIES. FLOWERS, FOLIAGE AND OASIS WILL BE SUPPLIED

One container per person. Examples of containers are:

The Creating Begins At the March meeting the numbers had grown from our usual membership ―regulars.‖ Some visitors arrived who wanted to ―get involved with arrangements.‖ Husbands brought containers and wives brought containers. In most cases, the men and women worked separately, but in some instances couples worked together. The session was started by setting ground rules about the mechanics, then brief explanations of things to be aware of relative to line and space (with illustrations and sharing examples). Floral materials had been pre-packaged (3 - 5 roses, some lines of foliage, a couple of pussy willow branches, and some filler materials - each package was slightly varied) in wrapped newspaper around the tops with the bottom of the flowers and foliage in buckets with water. Pre-packaging of the materials is essential because the participants can begin with arranging immediately, and there is no confusion in scrambling to get roses and line materials. Each person was given one of these packages that contained the flowers and foliage. Information

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RAB - Winter 2009/10

about understanding a basic line (including proportion and dominant focus) was discussed in addition to the various directions that a line could take (upright, slanted or horizontal) depending upon the growth and structure of the naturalistic line(s) that was included in these packages.

Penn-Jersey District Arrangement Seminar/Workshop Report by Pat Bilson Paoli, PA

The Penn-Jersey District held an Arrangement Seminar/Workshop Friday Sept 11, 2009 from 9 AM to 5 PM as a part of the Fall Convention this year hosted by The West Jersey Rose Society.

This was all of the information presented at that time, since I didn‘t want to overwhelm the participants with information. Each person put newspaper on the tables, positioned his/her container, received the materials and started by placng the branch or foliage line in the Oasis. This was followed by adding the roses and any other materials needed. When necessary and appropriate, reference was made to line and line-mass design; the directional importance; simple mechanics; placement of materials; dominance; proportion and scale; and other aspects.

Our new ARS Arrangement judges, Curtis Aumiller and Donna Smith as well as most of the current Penn -Jersey Judges Elaine Adler, Bonnie Nichols, Patria Lawrence, Nancy Redington, and myself were there to help the other arrangers during the workshop. Apprentice Arrangement Judge Jane Shipman was able to expand her knowledge, and Marlene Maroff, drove in from the Midwest to help the faculty. Sadly, one of the Penn-Jersey arrangement program founders, Theodora Saidman, was unable to attend and shortly after, passed away. We will all miss her expertise in all styles of arranging and her mentoring new judges.

The participants got involved quickly. When they finished, each could place their arrangements in niches that had been set up with various colors of cloths as backgrounds. In addition to discussing the arrangements, information about both advancing and receding color in the overall design was shown by manipulating the colored backgrounds.

The seminar focused on miniatures and their staging as these are a huge part of any local, district or National Rose Show.

A Follow-Up

Lunch was included with the seminar and as we ate, we had a lively discussion of local problems that have come up in rose shows. Ideas flew.

Our fall rose show will have special classes for beginning arrangers. One class is for women only, another for men only, and another class for couples who design an arrangement together. The enthusiasm for getting involved in this artistic pursuit has been beneficial in many ways: (1) the person now realizes that he/she can become involved in creatively designing a rose arrangement; (2) by understanding more about the process of creativity and about the elements and principles of design, the person can view the artistic section of a rose show with greater understanding; (3) the person can become enthusiastic about designing an arrangement and sharing it with other people - even by entering a rose show!

The workshop in the afternoon allowed each arranger to do 2-3 designs of their choice of style. Arrangement judges then discussed each design and a discussion of point scoring followed. All those who attended felt the seminar was time well spent and went away with a better focus on judging and staging miniature arrangements. Having a seminar as a part of a District convention has its pros and cons. It improves the District convention attendance and if you are attending the Convention anyway, it is one less school or seminar to re-qualify. However, it puts more pressure on the busy local judges who already have a lot on their plates.

From the Summer 2002 issue of the RAB, Kreg Hill Editor

RAB - Winter 2009/10

-16-

publication by the editor. You cannot effectively enlarge a file for publication, it becomes ―jiggy‖ because files are made up of tiny squares of color (pixels). When you enlarge a picture, this is accomplished by enlarging the pixels. Now that you have that good picture, it is important to know where you have saved it and what its name is, as these are necessary to find and attach it to an email. I hope you have all developed a good filing system on your computer.

Pictures Please by Jim Harrell RAB Editor

Now that the RAB has become a web distributed periodical, we have the capability of using lots of pictures in our publication. These pictures, as I have experienced in my other editorial adventures, are not always easy to acquire. I hope this article will help bring all you reluctant computer users kicking and screaming into the 21st century!

Next, to send the file, go to your email program of choice and create an email to the person to whom you wish to send the picture. Then you look for a paperclip icon or the word ―attach‖ and click on it. This will bring up a location where you select the file to send. Use the ―browse‖ function to go to the folder where you have stored the file, click on it and it will be attached to the email. If the email program asks if you want to optimize the file for email sending or viewing, tell it NO! this will only reduce the size and degrade the quality of the picture you are sending. Sending the picture as an attachment is the preferred way to send a picture. (It is also the best way to send an article as a word processor file so that the editor can work with it without having to transcribe it from hard copy.) You may send several files attached to a single email if you have a good DSL or Cable internet connection. Do not send pictures imbedded in the email, they are very difficult to extract. Further if you use a proprietary photo service like Picasa or Kodak Easy Share, you may find that not everyone can receive your pictures because they are not subscribers to the service themselves and that these services may reduce the size of a file for their own internal purposes and not disclose this change to you.

Since the advent of digital cameras, we have the capability of preserving and sharing photographs of our arrangements, seminars and other rose events with others without the hassle or expense of printing and mailing them. Many programs have been created to help computer users edit, store and share pictures over the internet. For editors and publishers, this is both a blessing and curse. Soon after the technology evolved to send email, the ability to embed or attach pictures or documents was developed. At that time, slow dial-up connections were the standard, so it was important to reduce file size to facilitate uploading and downloading an email. Since high quality pictures were the worst culprit when it came to file sizes, they needed to be reduced radically (read: degraded) to make them transmit easily. Unfortunately, many of the programs that offer to help you send pictures through email were initially developed then and today still reduce the size of the file unless you specifically instruct them not to. While this may work okay for sending casual pictures of the kids to Grandma, or sharing vacation photos, they are most often NOT suitable for publication. So how do you send good pictures for publication? First you need a good picture. If it is out of focus, too washed out or too dark, it probably can‘t be improved. If it has already been shrunken to a small file size, it probably won‘t work. The best pictures run in file size from 500kb to 2 mb. These are easy to work with because they can be adjusted up to the resolution and down to the size needed for the

I hope this information helps you. If you have problems contact me at [email protected] and I will try to help.

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RAB - Winter 2009/10

Rose Show Results When reporting show results, please report the level (local, district or national), name of the host rose society, date(s)) of show, location (city, state) and the theme of the show. For each ARS award-winning arrangement include the class title, name of the arranger, the rose(s) used in the arrangement and the awards received. Only the ARS awards listed below will be included in this publication.

Standard Arrangement Awards: Miniature Arrangement Awards: # - National Award R - Royalty D - Duchess # = National Award r - Mini Royalty d - Mini Duchess G - Gold Medal A - Artist P - Princess g - Mini Gold Medal a - Mini Artist p - Mini Princess S - Silver Medal O - Oriental K - Keepsake s - Mini Silver Medal o - Mini Oriental k - Mini Keepsake B - Bronze Medal DK - Duke RC - Rosecraft b - Mini Bronze Medal mf - Mini Flora rc - Mini Rosecraft CE - Court of Etiquette ce - Mini Court of Etiquette Other Arrangement Awards: J - Judge Jr - Junior N - Novice PA - Personal Adornment NR - Not Reported, Not Recorded, Other Problem

Great Lakes District Rose Show

1803

Grand Valley RS Grand Rapids, MI Sept 5-6, 2009 Theme: "Any Time of the Year" Class Title

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Cherry Blossom Irma Blok Time

The Temptations, G, P Classic Touch

Harvest Time

Joan Wiley

Sunsprite

S, DK

Picnic Time

Irma Blok

Limelight, St. Patrick & more

B, CE

School time

Rose Enders

Dreamward

R

A Time For All Seasons

Irma Blok

Touch of Class

O

School Time

Joan Wiley

Kristin

g, r

Party Time

Joan Wiley

Ruby Baby

s, ce

Jim Zimmerman

Folklore, Gemini, R Touch of Class

Wheat Blowing in Lew Shupe the Fields

Watercolor, Rosenfelde

Neil Armstrong

Gary Barlow

Abraham Darby, Rosenfelde, DK Green Rose

"Holy Toledo"

Lew Shupe

Green Ice

g

Birthplace of Aviation

Gary Barlow

Ruby Baby

s

The Ohio Flag

Randy Lady

Kristin

b,r

Tomato Juice

Gary Barlow

Ruby Ruby, Bambino

a

Lady Bug

Paul Colombo Jr.

Shameless, Ruby Ruby

Jr

Santa Fe RS Santa Fe, NM

O

Sept. 19, 2009

Theme: "A Melody of Roses"

Autumn Bouquet Irma Blok

Amber Star, Rab diant, Kristin

Summer's Beauty

Barry Crassweller

NR

K

Ebb Tide

Sandy Tomlinson Orange Sunblaze G,O

One Minute in Time

Barry Crassweller

NR

rc

Ramblin Rose

Sandy Tomlinson

Any Time

Jim Zimmerman NR

J

Everything's Juanita Ortega Comin' up Roses

Heaven on Earth B,P

Happy Together Shelby Green

Fourth of July

A

My Wild Irish Rose

Marilyn Monroe

D

To Sir With Love Juanita Ortega

Burgundy Iceberg

DK

Little Wonders

Gwen Anlian

Jean Kenneally

g

Roses are Red, My Love

Gwen Anlian

Cuddles

s,r

Dream a Little Dream of Me

Gwen Anlian

Lights of Broada way

Forest City RS - Cleveland, OH

Class Title

Sept. 12, 2009

Theme: "The Uniqueness of Ohio" Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

The Amish in Ohio

Class Title

Gary Barlow

Carefree Wonder G,D

Monuments

Gary Barlow

Bolero 4000, St. S,A Patrick

Gary Barlow

Abraham Darby, Pink Promise, B Gemini

Ohio Inventors

RAB - Winter 2009/10

Awds

-18-

Exhibitor

Shelby Green

Rose Varieties

Tournament of Roses

Awds

S

The Way We Were

Shelby Green

Hot Tamale

Ribbons of HighJennifer Galli ways Betty Ann CasBig Ribbons sina

k

Bee's Knees, Fairhope, Nancy J Jean

My Cherie Amour Gerry Mahoney

Class Title

Exhibitor

Baubles and Gus Banks Beads Rhythm & Blues Gus Banks

Rose Varieties

Awds

not listed

o

not listed

DK

Fourth of July

CE

Jennifer Galli

Rainbow's End, Nozomi, Sweet Sue

k

Bow Tie

Jennifer Galli

Ruby Pendant

rc

East County RS Ramona, CA

Oct. 3, 2009

Theme: "All Aboard" Class Title

3:10 to Yuma

Marion County RS Ocala, FL

DK

Tie a Ribbon

Jersey Shore RS Middletown, NJ Sept. 19, 2009 Theme: "Roaring 20's and all that Jazz"

Irresistible

Oct. 24, 2009

Theme: "Fall Flight of Fantasy"

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Sandy Campillo

Sunstruck

G,D

Heaven Bound Train

Sandy Campillo

Let Freedom Ring

S,A

Loco Motion

Maggi Jensen

Tiffany

B,DK

Frank Hastings

Anistasia

O

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Gleaming Radiance

Sentimental Journey

Jean Stream

Susan Barry

R

The Bart

Sandy Campillo

Trinket, Starina

g,a

Drifting Leaves

Jean Stream

Mavrik

O

Bridge on the River Kwai

Sandy Campillo

Trinket

o

Whirlaway

DK

The Iron Horse

Mary Frank

not listed

K

Desert Rose

Sandy Campillo

Hot Tamale

k

Dixie Dahl

Wild Plum

ce

Helen Baird

Pierrine

J

Class Title

Evening's Jean Stream Glowing Embers Jean Stream

Bee's Knees

r

Firefly Dance

Jean Stream

Whirlaway, Power Point, Bee's Knees

All Aboard for Dixieland

a

Freedom Train

Glowing Petals

Jean Stream

Louisville Lady

o

Miami Valley RS Dayton, Ohio

Fall's Fancy

Theme: "Reflections of Autumn"

NCNH District Rose Show

Class Title

- Foster City, CA Oct. 3, 2009

Windy Autumn Storm

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Gary Barlow

Watercolors

G,D

Theme: "Ribbons" Class Title

Exhibitor

Oct. 4, 2009

Waving Grasses Lew Shupe

Earth Song, S,O Carefree Wonder

Rose Varieties

Awds

Varigated Colors Eilene Chun

Just Joey, Brandy, Gold Medal

G,A

Lovely Ribbon Roses

Eilene Chun

Betty Boop

S,D

Velvet Ribbon

Cynthia Chuang

Gemini

B,O

Yantai

mf

Jim Zimmerman Pat’s Choice R Louise Estes, Treetops holding Gary Barlow Kimberlina, A Raindrops Green Rose Spooky HallowMemphis Blues, Lew Shupe g,a een Ruby Ruby Bare November Sue Witwer Angelica Renae s Days Fluttering Leaves Sue Witwer From Trees

Bunched LoveliElsina Dean ness Roll of Ribbon

Maxine Hineman

Gold Medal

N

Rosette of Ribbon Roses

Jennifer Galli

Best Friend, Brass Ring

g,d

Small Ribbon

Kathy Pifari

Busy Bee

s,r

Thanksgiving

Red Sunset October Moon Nodding Ears of Corn Brambles and Thorns

May Day RibSweet Sue, Little Jennifer Galli b,ce bons and Roses Pinkie Tangled Beauty Lesa Lane Betty Ann Ribbon Roses Cassina

Salute

o

Gingersnap

P

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Sweet Caroline

b,o

Breath of Spring, Glowing Amber, Jim Zimmerman r Hot Tamale, Memphis King Sandy Searson

Perfect Moment P Ty, Hot Tamale, Jim Zimmerman p Miss Flippins Gary Barlow

Day Breaker

DK

RAB - Winter 2009/10

Roses Burnt with Gary Barlow Frost

St. Patrick, Pat's Choice, VetCE eran's Honor

Fall Picnics

Barbara Zimmerman

The Frost is on the Pumpkin

Barbara Zimmerman

Various

ce

October Dance

Sue Witwer

Dublin

PA

Earthworms, Roses and Fall Branches

Gary Barlow

Deep South District Rose Show

Candy Sunblaze k

Coeur d'Alene

The Last Rose of Meredith Weller Tennessee Summer

Nashville RS Nashville, TN

Tallahassee Area RS Tallahassee FL Oct. 16-18, 2009 Theme: "Celebrating Our Heritage" Class Title

B J

Oct. 13, 2009

Theme: "The Sound of Music" Class Title

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Wild Geese that Fly with the Sara Jo Gill Moon on their Wings

Crystalline

A Drop of Golden Ray Hunter Sun

Elina

Brown Paper Packages Tied Up With String

Brigadoon, GemB,A ini

Connie Baird

Tea, A Drink with Denise Thorne Jam and Bread I Have Denise Thorne Confidence in Me Raindrops on Roses My Favorite Things Nothing Comes from Nothing And I'll Sing Once More Oh, Help

G,O

Rose Varieties

Awds

A Rhythm All Its Jeff Hoffman Own

Brigadoon, Rocky top, St. G,A Patrick, Cesar E. Chavez

A Rose Odyssey Jean Stream

Louise Estes

S,R

The New 90's

Jean Stream

Vino Rosso

B,DK

Orlando Rose Magic

Jean Stream

Memphis King

g,r

An Ocean of Roses

Stuart Smith

Ty

s,o

A Rose Jubilee's Dean Hodge a Comin'

Grand Gala

P

Rockets and Roses

Moonlight, Green Jr Rose

Bry Cornwell

S,R

Sierra Foothills RS Granite Bay, CA Oct. 17, 2009 Theme: "Roses in the Sky"

Kimberlina, Knockout, Tour- CE nament of Roses Big Red, Here's Gert, Veteran's N Honor

Sara Jo Gill

Fairhope

Connie Baird

Bee's Knees,Tiffany Lynn, Kismet

s,r

Paula Williams

Bee's Knees

b,a

Connie Baird

Whirlaway

p

Denise Thorne

Tiffany Lynn

n

various Minis

J

Why am I Always Dean Hodge Last

Exhibitor

Class Title

g,o

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

The Dog Star

Linda Knowles

Firefighter, TimeG,R less

The Water Bearer

Sunee Webb

Peace

S,O

The Hunter

Elsina Dean

Princess Diana

B,A

Shooting Star

Sunee Webb

Chasin' Rainbows

r,g

Halley's Comet

Sunee Webb

Bambino, Hot Tamale

s

Milky Way

Linda Knowles

This is the Day

b

North Star

Ann Mansker

Green Ice

o

Dolly Parton

N

Legends

J

Charlotte Owyndyk Betty Ann Summer Triangle Cassina The Virgin

Dallas RS - Farmer's Branch, TX

Awds

Oct. 18, 2009

Theme: "National Treasures" Class Title

Bats and Breakfast at Carlsbad

RAB - Winter 2009/10

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Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Kathy Harris

Fragrant Plum

G,A

Liberty Enlightening the World Kathy Harris

My Wife Kathryn S,O

Mt. Rushmore, More than a Mountain Carving Kathy Harris

Memphis Magic

g,o

South Central District Houston RS Houston,TX

Fall National Rose Show

Oct. 24, 2009

Desert Rose Society Palm Springs, CA Nov. 13-14 2009

Theme: "Houston Places" Class Title

Theme: "A Date in Palm Springs"

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Heights Bungalow

Nellwyn Royer

St. Patrick

R

Astrodome

Brenda Johnson Hot Princess

S,A

"America the Beautiful: Above Lauren Toth the Fruited Plain"

Clear Lake

Don Johnson

Fantasy

B,O

Ancient Live Oaks

"The River"

#

Don Johnson

Lynette

D

Marcia SanchezHeather Sproul Walsh

Kemah Boardwalk

Diana Kilmer

Flutterbye

G,P

Brenda Johnson Louisville Lady

The Living Desert Idyllwild

Hetty Shurtleff

S,O

Hermann Park

Nellwyn Royer

Fame & Rina Hugo

Rodeo

Sheryl Broussard Veterans' Honor RC

Hot Princess, Double Delight

Class Title

DK G, CE

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Deidre Hall, Ca# jun Sunrise

Village Green Marcia Sanchez- Pink Traviata, Wild Blue Yonder, B Heritage Center Walsh Greetings Chill

Ron Feurer

Veterans' Honor & Let Freedom A Ring

El Mirador

Peggy Bakke

Various

El Paseo

Barbara Schnei- Red Minimo & der Sorcerer

g,a

Thorny Theater

Pamela Nelson

Irresistible

s

Rio del Sol

Jim Harrell

Soroptimist Int'l

b,r

Desert Willow

Jim Harrell

Soroptimist Int'l

o

RS of Green Valley Green Valley, AZ Nov. 1, 2009

Point Happy

Sue Diller

Sweet Revenge p

Theme: "Thanksgiving Roses"

Box Canyon

JoAnn Richard

St. Patrick, WildD fire,

Joshua Tree National Park

Sue Diller

Hot Tamale

Indian Canyons

Barbara SchneiKaleidoscope der

Ingleside Inn

Barbara Steffensmeier

D

Windmills

Marcia SanchezMarilyn Monroe Walsh

Fantasy Springs Barbara Casino Resort Steffensmeier

Zinger

RC

St.Patrick

CE

River Oaks ManRobin Hough sion

Pierrine, Minnie Pearl, Suzy

g,r

San Jacinto Monument

Don Johnson

Bee's Knees

s,p

Lazy Bayou Galveston Beaches

Robin Hough Don Johnson

Fairhope Solar flair

b,o d

Armand Bayou Nature Center

Brenda Johnson Bee's Knees

Class Title

k

Exhibitor

Rose Varieties

Awds

Pilgrims Pride

Terry Swartz

Gemini

G,R

Cornstalk Teepees

Dream come Donaldina Joung True

Harvest Moon

Marydes Britton

John F. Kennedy B

Scarecrows in the Field

Terry Swartz

Blake Hedrick

Wild Turkeys

Donaldina Joung Black Jade

g,a

Autumn Sunset

Terry Swartz

s,o

Halo today

S,O

R

d DK

Little Pinkie, Tiny PA Flame K

Pumpkin Patches Marydes Britton

Vanilla Kordana b,r

Festival of Lights Barbara Parade Steffensmeier

Football & Parades

Memphis Music, Memphis Magic, J Abby's Angel

Spring Break

Cordelia Sanchez-Walsh

Marilyn Monroe, Jr Starstruck

Casa Chiquita

Helen Baird

Miss Flippins

Mary Lou Coffman

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J

RAB - Winter 2009/10

Congratulations to National Challenge Class Winners At the ARS National Convention and Rose Show in Palm Springs CA on November 13-14, the results of the National Challenge classes were as follows:

The Dr & Mrs. Harry Overesch Trophy - "America the Beautiful: Above the Fruited Plain" was won by Lauren Toth of Peoria , AZ with Deidre Hall and Cajun Sunrise.

The Millie Walters Memorial Trophy - ―The River‖ was won by Marcia Sanchez-Walsh of Valley Village, CA with Heather Sproul.

Congratulations to these two exhibitors for their outstanding achievement. Photos by Jim Harrell

RAB - Winter 2009/10

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Y

ou‘ve heard of Planet Earth and Planet Hollywood. Now you‘re invited to Planet Roses — a world filled with roses from beginning to end! Join us April 29 through May 2 for an outstanding ARS Spring National Conference and Rose Show held at the home of the American Rose Society Headquarters, Shreveport, LA. Activities will move between the American Rose Center and the Shreveport Convention Center, with our convention hotel, the Hilton Shreveport, conveniently located adjacent to the Convention Center. With the Shreveport Rose Society and ARS staff as hosts, attendees will choose from a schedule filled with rosy options — all flavored with a bit of Louisiana‘s unique culture. Lew Shupe and Gary Barlow will conduct a Beginners Arrangement Seminar Friday Morning 9:00 - Noon and Lew Shupe will have an Advanced Arrangers Seminar on Friday Afternoon, 1:30 - 4:30. On Saturday, Lew will give a presentation ―From the Ground to the Vase: Arranging your Roses‖ from 4:00 to 4:50. More information is available on the ARS website under the ―About ARS‖ tab on the home page.

Upcoming Events 2010 Please send in your upcoming Seminars and Judges School Dates to be included on the Events Calendar! March 13

May 21-23

Sept 18 -19

Rose Arranger’s Bulletin is an official quarterly publication of the American Rose Society. Address questions and inquiries to:

Ventura, CA: Pacific Southwest District Seminar on Modern Design, Ventura County Fairgrounds, Audit credit for judges. Marylou Coffman, [email protected] , 480-926-3064.

The American Rose Society P. O. Box 30,000 Shreveport, LA 71130-0030 (800) 637-6534 Please address comments, corrections of content and submit articles to:

Lake City, FL: Deep South District Judging School, (Arrangement and Horticulture) Jim Harrell, [email protected], 912-634-0323

Jim Harrell Editor

121 Shore Rush Circle St. Simons Island, GA 31522 [email protected]

Wichita, Kansas: Central District Arrangement Judging School, Central District Convention and Rose Show, Wanda Weirich, [email protected], 636-239-7380.

Sandy Dixon Chairman, Arrangement Judging Committee 6181 Deepwood Dr. E. Jacksonville, FL 32244-2621 [email protected]

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RAB - Winter 2009/10