1) What is Complex Training? Using Complex Training to Develop Endurance Athletes

Using “Complex Training” to Develop  Endurance Athletes George Dallam, Ph.D. Professor Exercise Science and Health Promotion Colorado State University...
Author: Lawrence Quinn
6 downloads 0 Views 717KB Size
Using “Complex Training” to Develop  Endurance Athletes George Dallam, Ph.D. Professor Exercise Science and Health Promotion Colorado State University ‐ Pueblo

1) What is “Complex Training”? • A training approach whereby multiple intensities and durations are utilized to fully develop the ability to perform at a given duration or intensity successfully. • This approach traditionally targets perceived  physiological limiters such as maximum oxygen  uptake, lactate thresholds, long and short anaerobic  capacities, total glycogen storage capacity and  neuromuscular recruitment and peak force.

What is the scientific evidence supporting  a complex training approach? The Evidence is of three types as follows: a. A generally accepted model for endurance  performance. b. Studies examining the effects of given intensities of  training on performance. c. Studies making overall comparisons of limited  intensity variation approaches versus approaches  using greater variability in intensity.

A. The Widely Accepted Model of  Endurance Performance The scientific model most broadly accepted to explain  endurance performance is based on 4 widely studied  factors:

• • • •

VO2 max Fractional utilization of VO2 max Movement Economy (Energy costs) Anaerobic Capacity

Note:  The model might also include some measure of glycogen storage capacity or  “endurance” but does not as experimental evidence in this area is lacking.

Papers Supporting the Model Definitive Paper describing the original model – VO2max, Lactate Threshold and Economy.  http://jp.physoc.org/content/586/1/35.short

Seminal paper linking anaerobic characteristics to  endurance performance capability. 

http://europepmc.org/abstract/MED/9927020

Experimental paper linking strength training and  anaerobic power to endurance performance through  economy.  http://jap.physiology.org/content/86/5/1527

B.  Studies Supporting a Variety of Training  Intensities and Durations Individually. Anaerobic and/or Hit Training Review Article:     Study suggesting the effectiveness of longer duration  HIT: http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256‐200232010‐00003

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1440244006001149

Lactate threshold training   Study showing improved factional utilization of oxygen  with LT training.   http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00426304

B.  Studies Supporting a Variety of Training  Intensities and Durations Individually. Strength Training Review of running and resistance training supporting an  economy mechanism:   http://journals.lww.com/nscajscr/Abstract/2008/11000/The_Effects_of_Resistance_Training_on_Endurance.43.aspx

Review of running, cycling and swimming (no effect in  swimming):  http://link.springer.com/article/10.2165/00007256‐199825030‐00005

B. Studies Supporting a Variety of Training  Intensities and Durations Individually. Aerobic Training Volume Study showing better performance associated with  higher training volumes. http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00715006

Study showing improved adaptation with a higher  relative aerobic training volume. http://journals.lww.com/nsca‐jscr/abstract/2007/08000/impact_of_training_intensity_distribution_on.48.aspx

C.  Study comparing a complex approach to a  more narrowly defined “aerobic” approach  supports the  idea that a complex approach is  more effective over time. Study showing improved performance in skiers once a  largely low intensity training approach was replaced  with an approach that incorporated more high intensity  work.   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10449026

2) How are complex endurance  training programs developed? By testing  physiological response, velocity  and/or power to prescribe complex training at  “key” intensities.  This is commonly done in  three ways. 1) Physiological Approach 2) Velocity Predication Approach 3)  Hit or Miss Approach

A) The Physiological Approach • Limiters are considered to be oxygen delivery,  lactate clearance, pH buffering, glycogen  depletion.   • Typically done by using graded exercise testing  in combination with anaerobic testing such as  the Wingate protocol. • The common approach identifies blood lactate  values across a range of intensities along with  the intensity at which VO2max is reached.

Subject Data Aerobic Threshold Pace 6:42 min/mile * Long and intermediate distance runs at this pace  or slower with heart rate ceiling of 155, total  volume 50 miles. Anaerobic Threshold Pace 5:32 min/mile * 10 x 1K intervals at 5:20 once per microcycle. VO2 max Pace 4:41 min mile * 4 x 400 meters at 4:32 (68 per 400) once per  microcycle. 

B)  Velocity Prediction Approach • Uses prediction of velocities based on prior  performances.   • Examples include the prediction of various paces  based on lactate threshold pace and/or velocity at  VO2max – these use a constant for fatigue rate.   • It is also possible to predict for longer distances by  using two short distance time trials (i.e. 100 and 400  meter run) by applying a natural log function  accounting for variations in fatigue rate.

What is a fatigue rate? • This is the rate (%) at which velocity reduces each  time we double the distance of our efforts. • This is somewhat constant within an individual  across distances. • This varies widely between individuals based on  training volume and genetic abilities. • This lowers as one adapts to increased volumes of  training. • The values reached are lower in those genetically  suited to endurance and higher in those genetically  suited to sprinting.

Fatigue Rates • 2‐4% World Class Marathoners  • 4‐6%  World Class Triathletes • 6‐8%  College Runners, well trained Age Group  Athletes ‐ the rate range reflected in most prediction  tables. • 10‐12%  Well Trained mid distance and sprinters. • 15‐16%  Generally fit people. • > 20% low fit generally sedentary people.

Insert TT times in yellow, use time format. Running distance (meters)

time(hr:min:secs.tenths)

min/mile

mph

Fatigue Rate

100

0:00:13.7

03:40.5

16.33

00:00.0

400

0:01:01.3

04:06.6

14.60

00:00.0

800

0:02:09.7

04:20.8

13.80

00:00.0

1600

0:04:34.3

04:35.9

13.05

00:00.0

3200

0:09:40.2

04:51.8

12.34

00:00.0

5000

0:15:39.9

05:02.5

11.90

00:00.0

10,000

0:33:08.1

05:19.9

11.25

00:00.0

21,120

1:14:20.5

05:39.9

10.59

00:00.0

42,240

2:37:15.2

05:59.5

10.01

00:00.0

84,480

5:32:38.1

06:20.2

9.47

00:00.0

10:30:40.8

5.30%

C)  The Hit or Miss Approach  • Coach, Trainer develops various sets to reflect  various distances and the athlete performs  them to the best of his/her ability at the time. • This tends to produce efforts which often miss  the appropriate intensity by being too intense. • This makes successful adaptation less likely and psychological discomfort high.

3) Creating Training Programs that  Combine Complex Elements. Principle 1 ‐ “Start where you are, not where you want  to be.” • Initial load should reflect what has been done  previously.

Principle 2  ‐ “Create movement patterns first,  conditioning second.” • Most modern humans have movement deficiencies  which result in compensation.  • Movement technique is also often not efficient  or  effective. • These should be corrected before progressing  training loads and used as a limiter to progression,  i.e. don’t increase a swim set intensity if a significant  drop in stroke count occurs.

Principle 3 ‐ “Organize training to adapt to harder  work, not to work harder.” • This is accomplished by targeting specific velocities  and/or power output and/or resistance levels and  reps  and progressing when adaptation has  occurred, not by simply “trying harder”. • Use the rule of fours – break the target distance  into at least four parts and use interval training to  progress. • Adaptive state can be evaluated using heart rate  and RPE.

• When work is targeted appropriately training perception of  effort can remain tolerable and enjoyable. • Use one of the first two training intensity targeting methods  described previously when possible, when not be  conservative rather than aggressive. Example: Athletes Mile pace or VO2max velocity is 6:00 min/mile (10  mph) A target set for progression might be 4 x 400 meters in 1:28  (5:52 min/mile).

Principle 4 ‐ “Progress training as slowly as practical,  not as quickly as possible”. • Training progressions should not exceed 10% of  volume and/or intensity. • Use the 3 to 1 rule:  3 progressions should be  followed by 1 load reduction.  This ratio should only  decrease as one ages. • As stated previously, you should plan progressions  but only make them if successful adaptation occurs.

Why the 3 to 1 rule?

3.Creating Complex Training  Programs in Multisports • The same principles apply regardless of  movement pattern, i.e. swimming ,cycling  running, cc skiing, elliptical trainer, rowing,  etc. • Combine similar movement patterns on the  same day, i.e. running and cycling, and use  differing movement patterns on alternate  days, i.e. swimming and running.

• Use movement specific strength/power training,  i.e. squats and box jumps for running. • Utilize the endurance activity first followed by the  strength/power training. • Use longer training micro‐cycles when  possible to  provide more flexibility in  scheduling key sessions.

What this Looks Like in Practice Micro‐cycle Plan Day 1  Day 2  Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6

Speed run Speed Swim*, Speed Bike, Recovery Run, Weights Maintenance. Aerobic Run, Recovery Bike, Recovery Swim Race pace Swim, Race Pace O2 Bike/Run, Weights Maintenance Recovery Swim, Bike and Run Speed Endurance Bike/Run Combination, Aerobic Swim Weights  Maintenance Day 7 Speed endurance Swim, Recovery Bike/Run Day 8   Endurance Run, Aerobic Bike, Recovery Swim Day 9                Endurance Bike, Recovery Run, Endurance Swim, Weights Maintenance Day 10 Complete Recovery Day

Sample Speed Training Session with   Progressions over 4 Micro‐cycles  Standardized Warm‐up as follows: General mobility exercises and technique drills followed by 15 minutes progressive  warm‐up, descend pace in 1 minute increments to fast aerobic over the last 3 minutes.  Then 8 progressive strides (~20 secs or 100 meters progressing down to 400 meter  pace).   Microcycle 1 On treadmill: 2 x 20 sec at 400 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace. 2 x 40 secs minute at 800 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery  2‐3 minutes jog pace. 2 x 80 secs at 1600 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace.

Microcycle 2 On treadmill: 3 x 20 sec at 400 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3 minutes  jog pace. 3 x 40 secs minute at 800 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace. 3 x 80 secs at 1600 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace. Microcycle 3 On treadmill: 4 x 20 sec at 400 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3 minutes  jog pace. 4 x 40 secs minute at 800 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace. 4 x 80 secs at 1600 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace.

Microcycle 4 On treadmill: 2 x 20 sec at 400 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace. 2 x 40 secs minute at 800 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery  2‐3 minutes jog pace. 2 x 80 secs at 1600 pace with 30 secs off treadmill between each, full recovery 2‐3  minutes jog pace. Standardized aerobic work and cool down 2 miles at aerobic pace followed by 1 mile deceleration. Mobility exercises.

Further Reading Championship Triathlon Training, 2008, Human  Kinetics, George Dallam and Steve Jonas. Coaching and Teaching Triathlon Successfully,  Coaches Choice, 2015, George Dallam and Steve  Jonas. Triathlon Science, 2013, Human Kinetics. Please also find a paper entitled The Physiological Basis for  Training in Triathlon among Elite Athletes ,which was written as  a thesis for the original Level 3 Triathlon Coaching Certification,  as a handout at the presentation.

Suggest Documents