1. Course Syllabus & Content

1. Course Syllabus & Content Module Title: Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Introduction The aim of this module is to provide students with an ...
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1. Course Syllabus & Content Module Title: Introduction to Hospitality and Tourism Introduction The aim of this module is to provide students with an understanding of the nature of hospitality and hospitality products from both local and international perspectives. It will ensure students acquire a holistic understanding of the hospitality, including the travel and hospitality industry, including the impacts of hospitality on destination economies, communities and fragile environments. Students will be expected to take a critical perspective on the effects of hospitality on their own country, and how hospitality can have a strategic developmental function.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to;     

Describe the history and structure of international travel and hospitality industry Appraise the positive and negative impacts of tourism destination development Analyse a range of tourist needs and motivations to travel Discuss the development and distribution of hospitality products Describe the role played by Government

Contents Chapter 1

The history and structure of the travel, tourism, and hospitality industry



The historical beginning, growth and recent trends in hospitality, definitions of tourist and hospitality. Hospitality organizations, tourist boards, national and international organizations, lATA, WTO, CAA, BAA, ABTA, 'Visit Britain' and similar non-UK organizations.

Chapter 2

Tourists needs and motivations



The different types and needs of tourists; business, vacation, family, and tours Reasons for travel and the travel 'experience' for heritage, culture, scenery, weather Facilities, psychological and sociological influences, facilitators and motivators to encourage travel. Factors required to become a tourist destination Development of destinations, and the demand for niche holiday products, Man- made and natural tourist attractions

• •

Chapter 3

Development of hospitality products

• • •

Chapter 4

Transport and Accommodation

• •

Transportation facilities (road, rail, air, sea and inland waterways) Accommodation and food, the range available and grading criteria.

Chapter 5

The distribution of hospitality products



The role of tour operators and travel agents, travel agents as intermediaries, the interrelationships Links between the sectors, distribution and information technology.

Chapter 6

Governments and political issues



The role of governments and influence on hospitality, visas, permits and foreign exchange restrictions, political unrest Hospitality policy.

Chapter 7

Positive and negative economic hospitality impacts



Positive impacts: direct and indirect income and employment, the multiplier effect, contribution to GDP, currency exchange rates Negative impacts: foreign ownership of facilities and hotels, high level of imports of goods for hospitality, high demand driven inflation, seasonality, over dependence on hospitality industry.



Chapter 8

Positive and negative environmental hospitality impacts





Chapter 9

Positive and negative socio- cultural hospitality impacts





Chapter 10

Hospitality ethics and sustainable hospitality

• •

Positive: conservation of natural beauty areas, archaeological and historic sites, improved Infrastructure, environmental awareness Negative: environmental impacts, pollution, over development leading to destruction of flora and fauna, land use problems, waste disposal, damage to archaeological and historic sites. Positive: conservation of cultural heritage, buildings and artefacts, renewal of cultural pride, cross-cultural exchanges Negative: overcrowding, over commercialization, loss of authenticity or customs, social problems Influx of expatriate labour Issues in sustainable hospitality, sustainable policies and procedures in destinations Hospitality business practices and codes of conduct

Recommended Text • •

The Business of Hospitality, Holloway, J.C., (2002), Longman An Introduction to Hospitality, Butterworth-Heinneman, Lickorish, L.,and Jenkins, C., (1997)

Module Title: Front Office Operations Introduction This module introduces students to the systems and procedures required for Front Desk Office Operations. It emphasizes the importance of high standards in personal qualities and the provision of customer service. Students will develop knowledge and skills in reception procedures as well as understanding the key legislation that relates to reception procedures. They will also evaluate the suitability of different procedures for a range of hotel outlets.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to:      

Describe the range of front office operations and their functions Discuss the importance of communication with other sections within the hotel Explain the important role front office plays in selling the hotel and all its facilities Demonstrate reception procedures and explain how they contribute to customer satisfaction Explain the implications of key legislation for reception operations Demonstrate and explain the suitability of reception procedures for different types of hotel outlets

Contents Chapter 1

The role of the front office in the Hotel’s organisation

Chapter 2

Security and Safety responsibilities

Chapter 3

Communications

Chapter 4

Reservation Procedures

The hotel industry Hotel organisational structures The room division organisation Security aspects of the hotel Health and safety aspects Customer care Roles and responsibilities of a receptionist Spoken communication Non-verbal communication Written communication Telecommunications Fax E-mails Handling incoming and outgoing mail Methods of receiving reservation requests The information needed when receiving a request Use of international terms for rooms and bed types Packages offered by hotels and the range of terms used to describe them Methods used to record bookings such as diaries, conventional charts, density charts, stop-go charts and computers Yield management and overbooking Confirmation procedures, deposits and guarantees and cancellation procedures Reservation status, release times, guaranteed arrivals Group reservations

Chapter 5

Check-in Procedures

Registers, registration cards Booking out I walking a guest Chance arrivals. Key cards and keys, both mechanical and electronic Room status records and room allocation. Bedroom book, room status boards, computers. Group check in

Chapter 6

Electronic Booking Systems

Systems such as Fidelio, which provides hardware and software supporting point- of sale systems.

Chapter 7

Notifications and Records

Concerns the Arrivals list, Departures list, Room list, Function list, Wake up calls and papers and Guest history records

Chapter 8

Guest Accounting

Payment procedures, cash I non cash payment, accepting different methods of payment, recording deposits, prepayment and refunds, processing visitors paid outs (VPO's), disbursements, petty cash, Establishing credit worthiness Banking procedures, reconciling I checking floats, completing banking documentation, Security for cash I non-cash payments and transfer to bank

Chapter 9

Payment Methods

Cash and foreign currency I exchange Cheque such as the travellers cheque Credit cards which include charge card and debit card Vouchers Ledger accounts Advance deposits and pre-payments, Refunds

Chapter 10

Statistics and Reports Occupancy rates including double, sleeper, average room rate, revenue achieved, REVPAR and GOPPAR Guest statistics including length of stay, origin, average expenditure, source of bookings

Chapter 11

Selling Methods used Benefits to organization, increased occupancy, by Front Office Staff repeat business, brand loyalty, customer loyalty, new business, increased market share, keeping within budget, resources and support, staff training Selling techniques, product knowledge, communication skills up selling, selling other services, using sales leads, repeat sales, referred sales, maximum occupancy and room revenue Procedures, enquires, reservation, status, cancellations, amendments, records and documentation, room allocation Overbooking, releasing rooms, deposits, paying commission.

Recommended Text 

Hotel Front Office, S. Thomes, Braham, B., (1999)



Principles of Front Office Operations, Cassell, Baker, S., Bradley, P., & Huyton, J., (1994)

Module Title: Housekeeping Introduction The aim of Housekeeping module is to provide students with an overview of the range of functions within the facilities department of hotels. Summary of learning Outcomes To succeed in this module, students must:     

Describe the operational and supervisory aspects of running an accommodation operation to the requirements of an international client Explain the basic principles and procedures used in Housekeeping Explain the range of accommodation provided and the regular processes of cleaning and maintenance necessary to ensure the facilities and accommodation meets the customer requirements Describe the measures which influence and affect the facilities department Discuss environmental issues and how they are managed

Contents Chapter 1

Introduction to subject

• •

The range of accommodation available The scope of the facilities department within international hotels.

Chapter 2

Organizational structure and Communication



The structure of the department, the division of labour and staffing requirements. Communication between the accommodation department and others in the hotel.

Chapter 3

The Linen Room



The security, inspection, storage and stocktaking of linen.

Chapter 4

Materials



The use and care of hard and soft furnishings used within hotels.

Chapter 5

Procedures and Equipment

• •

The correct use of equipment and materials The procedures involved in cleaning accommodation and public areas of a hotel.

Chapter 6

Maintenance



The maintenance procedures of facilities.

Chapter 7

Legislation and emergency procedures



The procedures to be followed in case of an emergency The legal responsibilities and equipment.



• Chapter 8

Energy and Green Issues

• •

The main types of energy used in a hotel, the ways these are metered Procedures used to minimize energy consumption



How to be environmentally proactive.

Recommended Text •

Hotel, Hostel and Hospital Housekeeping (5th Edition) Branson & Lennox, (1 965). Published by Hodder and Stoughton



Handbook of Facilities Management, Guildford Press, Butterworth Heinneman. ISBN Spedding, A., (1994)

Module Title: Food and Beverage Operations

Introduction The aim of Food and Beverage Operations module is to provide students with an understanding of the operational and supervisory aspects of running a food and beverage operations for an international clientele in a range of establishments to encourage an appreciation of the origins of such systems and to understand the various factors involved in meeting customer needs. Students will gain an understanding of food and wine and its service in a variety of styles of restaurant and establishments and they will have sufficient knowledge to produce a detailed plan for specified food and beverage operations.

Learning Outcomes To succeed in this module, students must:    

Describe a range of Food and Beverage production and service methods used in a variety of outlets. Explain the organization for a range of Food and Beverage operations. Discuss measures to improve food and beverage practice and procedures. Explain the purpose and methods of developing food production systems and how this meets customer requirements.

Contents Chapter 1

Food Production Operations

• •

Chapter 2

Food Service Systems

• • •

Food production systems, cook-chill, cookfreeze, Sous-vide and centralized production. The suitability of these systems to the operations. Quality Assurance systems. Methods of food service, silver service, plate service, buffet, counter service, room service, self-service, assisted service. Types of outlet, banqueting, fast food, restaurant, public house, transport catering. Implications, cost, customer demand, timescale, staffing level, staff skill level, layout of operation. Operation, banquet, fast food, restaurant, public house, transport. Suitability of operation. Preparation and layout of beverage service, service of beverages, alcoholic beverages, nonalcoholic beverages, hot beverages

Chapter 3

Production and sale of non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages



Chapter 4

Menu planning and standard recipes



Menu structure and trends, equipment and commodities, preparation and cooking, timing, use of standard recipes.

Chapter 5

Staffing Skills



Chapter 6

Functions and Events



Attitude, personal appearance, hygiene practices, attentiveness, body language, effective communications, team work, attention to detail. Types of events, planning, organizing and costing of an event, hygiene considerations, staffing the event, evaluation

Recommended Text

• •

Food and Beverage Service (Hodder and Stoughton), Lillicrap D., Cousins J., and Smith, R., (1998) The Management of Foodservice Operations, (Cassell) Merricks, P., and Jones, P., (1994)

Module Title: Food Sanitation, Safety and Health Introduction This module makes an important contribution to the supervisory aspects of food hygiene and safety. Supervisors with food safety and health and safety responsibilities need to ensure that all staff operates in a safe, hygienic and efficient manner. The overall aims of this module are to ensure students are familiar with key aspects of current legislation, good practice and health, safety and food safety issues.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to; • • • • • •

Identify and discuss hazards and control risks Describe the process of conducting a risk assessment Explain how a review of workplace safety is conducted Discuss the impact of legislation on employers, customers, staff and others who may use the outlet Communicate information about workplace safety and food safety Discuss the underlying principles of food hygiene and apply this knowledge to their work

Contents Chapter 1

Creating a safe environment

• •

Chapter 2

Working with Health and Safety



Chapter 3

Fire



Chapter 4

Food Safety



Chapter 5

HACCP

• •

Chapter 6

Security

• • • • •

Health and safety policy, employers responsibility, employees responsibility, identifying Reporting hazards, assessing risks, preventative action, monitoring and review procedures, legislation Design and layout of workplace areas, handling hazardous substances, manual handling, workflow documentation, cleaning routines, dangerous equipment Fire hazards, fire legislation, preventing fires, firefighting equipment Preventing cross contamination, maintaining personal hygiene, proper storage, preparation and cleaning methods, legislation, microbiology/ bacteria, temperature control, food pests, premises and equipment, food safety control HACCP based food safety management systems, Purpose of HACCP, definition of hazard; biological, chemical and physical hazards, hazard analysis, definition and examples of critical control points, good manufacturing practice People - staff, customers and any persons in the premises Property- the building, equipment, stock, personal items Money- takings, floats, personal money, cash, money transfers Information- business records, personal data

Recommended Text  The Food Hygiene Hand book, Aston, G., (2001) • Essential Food Hygiene, Donaldson, R.J., (1999), H a r t l e y Reproductions Ltd

Module Title: Hospitality Accounting Introduction This module will give students the knowledge, skills and techniques that will help with the management decision making process. It will look at the process and practices which take place within a hotel business environment and at the analytical skills required to understand accounting and financial information.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to: • • • •

Demonstrate a basic knowledge of accounting concepts and principles Apply accounting concepts and principles Appreciate the importance of costs and profit in a hotel business Discuss the use of management accounting information as a decision making tool in a hotel business environment

Contents Chapter 1

System for Financial Accounting



• • •

Chapter 2

Accounting for Credit Transactions

• •

Chapter 3

Accounting for Cash



Chapter 4

Purchasing and Storage of Goods







Balance sheet, capital expenditure, revenue expenditure, classification of transactions and their effect on the balance sheet into Asset and Liability exchange, Investment and Drawings by the owner; Investment by, and Repayments to third parties; and Profit and Loss Methods of recording, processing and correcting financial information, the double entry system and the extraction of a trial balance Types of errors and their correction using suspense accounts, calculation of profit and loss from a trial balance using the vertical format, accruals and pre- payments and their effect on the final accounts, preparation of a balance sheet at the end of the financial period. The difference between cash and credit transactions, debtors and creditors accounts, matching of accounts with statements received, The use of credit control systems, provision for bad or doubtful debts. The importance of cash to a firm, bank reconciliation, cash and credit card takings control, petty cash systems, handling foreign currency, cash flow forecasts for simple firms. The policies and procedures for purchasing of food and non-food items for a hotel environment The use of standard purchasing specifications and other recognized standards/brand names when ordering both food and non-food items, the documents used in purchasing and their purpose and relationship to each other The correct storage of commodities including legal requirements for food and chemicals. The Security aspects of storing high value items, procedures for the issuing of stock items, including all records kept, and checks on the use of commodities.

Chapter 5

Raw Materials Costs





Chapter 6

Employee Costs



Chapter 7

Cost Control

• •

• Chapter 8

Portion Control And Standard Recipe

• •

Chapter 9

Menu Costing



Chapter 10

Labour Costs

• •

Dish and portion costing for a range of food and beverage items, setting the selling price using formulas to achieve specific gross profit margins The use of percentages when calculating gross and net profit, the importance of both portion control and standard recipes to ensure maximum profits are achieved. Methods of remunerating employees, measurement of staff efficiency, payroll systems, accounting for payroll costs including Payroll Taxes to governments. The calculations of dish and portion costing for a range of food and beverage items, setting the selling price using product costing, by the use of formulas to achieve specific gross profit margins, The use of percentages when calculating gross and net profit. The importance of both portion control Standard recipes to ensure maximum Profits are achieved. Menu costing and the effect of variances in sales mix on the profitability of an operation linked to differential gross How labour costs are calculated and the factors to be considered when calculating them, typical labour costs profit margins. for a variety of operations Use of percentages, a number of methods for measuring labour efficiency.

Chapter 11

Operating Overheads



The definition of overheads, and examples, relating to food and beverage and accommodation operations, basic departmental operating statements

Chapter 12

Forms of Payment



An analysis of the different forms of payment generally accepted by the hotel industry including Cash, Cheques, Foreign currency, Travellers' cheques, Credit cards, Credit accounts, Debit cards, Internet payments The advantages and disadvantages of each form of payment.



Recommended Text •

• •

Hospitality Accounting, Nestor de J. Portocarrero Elisa S. Moncarz (January 1, 2005), ISBN10: 9861541993 .ISBN-13: 978-9861541990 Accounting for Hotel, Travel and Leisure, Owen, G., (1999), Longman The Fundamental Principles of Restaurant Cost Control, Pavesic, (2004), Prentice Hall

Module Title: Customer Service Introduction This module give the students a better understanding of what is customer service and how it can provide quality product or service that satisfies the needs/wants of a customer. It also emphasises the effective communication skills in customer relations and services, and learn how to deal with various customer- related situations, which is also an integral part of tourism and hospitality studies.

Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to;     

Describe and explain customer relations and services; Identify the personal attributes of a service staff; Describe how culture may influence customer expectations; Identify and discuss appropriate etiquette and customs for receiving customers of different cultural backgrounds, e.g. appropriate appellations, gestures and eye contact; Explain the importance of company policy in improving and maintaining quality customer services;

Contents   

Who is Customers? Why customers are important? The nature of customer service

             

Personality First Impression Personal Grooming Personal Hygiene What is Communication? Types of Communications Listening and Speaking Skills Barriers to Communication Basic Grammar Rules Common Mistakes Vocabulary of Politeness Cultural Difference What is Ethics? Greetings

Customer Expectations and Perceptions

 

Chapter 7

Handling Customer Complaints

 

How to Gain Customer Loyalty? How to Meet and Exceed Customer Satisfaction? How to Handle Customer Complaints? Effective Ways to Handle Customer Complaints

Chapter 8

Dealing with Difficult Customers

 

Types of Customers How to Deal and Tackle Difficult Customers?

Chapter 1

Introduction Service

to

Customer

Chapter 2

Personal Attributes of Hospitality and Tourism Staff

Chapter 3

Communication Skills

Chapter 4

Use of English in Customer Service

Chapter 5

Customs and Etiquette

Chapter 6

Recommended Text: Customer Service in The Hospitality And Tourism Industry. Donald M. Davidoff, Davidoff Associates ISBN-10: 0138089167 • ISBN-13: 9780138089160 Customer Service: A Practical Approach, Elaine K. Harris. ISBN-10: 013274239X • ISBN-13: 9780132742399

Customer Service for Hospitality and Tourism. Simon Hudson, Louise Hudson. ISBN: 978-1-90899933-7 HBK, 978-1-908999-34-4 PBK

Module Title: Organizational Behaviour in Hospitality Industry Introduction This is an introduction to the basic concepts and topics in organisational behaviour (OB). It focus on OB at three levels: individual, interpersonal, and collective. Students will learn the individual level, covering decision-making, motivation, and personality and then turn to the interpersonal level, covering power, influence, and negotiations. Finally, the course will move up to the collective level, covering groups and managing change

Learning Outcomes On completion of this module students will be able to: • • • • •

Identify and discuss core themes of current debates in organisational theory and behaviour Discuss the base of individual behaviour and interpretation Recognise group and team dynamics and develop adequate operational theories Describe the interplay of organisation structure, culture, theory and politics Discuss intra-organisational and inter-organisational issues

Contents Chapter 1

Introduction to Field of Organizational Behaviour

• • •

Perspective of Organizational Effectiveness Types of Individual Behaviour Contemporary Challenge for Organizations

Chapter 2

Individual Behaviour, Personality and Values

• • •

Self-Concept: The “I” in organizational behaviour Values in the workplace and across culture Ethical values and Behaviour

Chapter 3

Perception and Learning in Organization

• • •

The Perceptual process Improving Perception Learning in Organization

Chapter 4

Workplace Emotions, Attitude and Stress

• • •

Emotional Labour and Emotional Intelligence Job Satisfaction and Organizational Commitment Workplace Stress and Stress Management

Chapter 5

Employee Motivation, Foundation and Practices Team Dynamics

• • •

Expectancy Theory of Motivation Organizational Justice Job Design and Empowerment

• • •

Teams and informal groups Advantages and disadvantages of teams Organizational and team environment

Communicating in Teams and Organizations Power and Influence in the workplace

• • •

The importance of communication Communication channels Choosing the best communication medium

• • •

The meaning of power Source of powers in the organization Contingencies of power

Conflict Management

• • •

Is conflict good or bad? Conflict process model Structural sources of conflict in organization

Chapter 6

Chapter 7

Chapter 8

Chapter 9

Chapter 10

Leadership and Organizational Change

• Meaning of leadership • Competency perspective of leadership • Behavioural perspective of leadership • Elements of organization structure, culture • Changing and strengthening organization culture Three approaches to organizational change

Recommended Text •

McShane, Glinow; (2009); Organizational Behaviour Essentials; 2 nded , Mcgraw-Hill

Facilities and Maintenance Management Facilities management is firmly established as an important subject in the academic discipline in the higher education sectors. This is because this subject introduces the balance of generic management skills core quality of an organization, the value and the risk in processes and to be focused on the facilities operations. These operational skills for the delivery of the facilities services are covered by the management of space, environment, communications and the full range of services that supports business effectiveness in the hospitality and tourism industry. Learning outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: • • • •

Understand the extent of facilities management in the hospitality and tourism industry Define and analyze the importance of having the maintenance and engineering department Identify the impediments to understand the role the building plays in the profitability of the hospitality and tourism environment. Be aware of the security and green issues involved in this subject

Syllabus • The Facilities Management Impact • The Maintenance/Engineering Department • Issues and Trends • Solid and Hazardous Waste • Water Systems • Electrical Systems • Heating Systems • Cooling Systems • Ventilation • Safety and Security

Lesson Plan Session Subject 1 Facilities and Maintenance Introduction 2 The Facilities Management Impact 3 The Maintenance/Engineering Department 4 Issues and Trends 5 Solid and Hazardous Waste 6 Water Systems 7 Electrical Systems 8 Heating Systems 9 Cooling Systems 10 Ventilation 11 Safety and Security 12 In-class test/presentation 13 Revision 14 Revision Recommended Textbook Managing the Built Environment In Hospitality Facilities, First Edition. Dina Zemke, Thomas Jones published by Pearson, Prentice Hall (2010)

Food and Beverage Management This module focuses on the analysis of the operations and determines the best course of action in food & beverage operations and management. It examines the ways to maximize service efficiency and productivity to satisfy demands of today's guests. Topics also include organization of food & beverage operations, marketing, nutrition, menu, standard product costs & pricing strategies, productions, service, cost controlling, facility design, layout and equipment. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: • • • • • • • • • • •

Identify the major factors affecting the growth of the food and beverage industry. Understand the customer. Develop a marketing plan. Promote the operation. Understand the pricing and designing of the menu. Understand the important of delivering high quality service. Understand the important of physical facility. Develop procedures for the effective purchasing, receiving, storing, and issuing of items used in the operation. Understand the important of kitchen equipment selection, maintenance and energy management Exercise effective cost controlling Learn about the concept of risk management and the safeguarding of assets.

Syllabus • • • • • • •

Food and Beverage Operations and Management Developing the Consumer-Product Relationship Food Production Beverage Control Designing Operational Areas, Equipment and Staffing of Foodservice Operations Food and Beverage Service Performance Appraisal and Decision Making

Lesson Plan Session Subject 1 Food and Beverage Operations and Management 2 Food and Beverage Operations and Management 3 Developing the Consumer-Product Relationship 4 Developing the Consumer-Product Relationship 5 Food Production 6 Beverage Control 7 Designing Operational Areas, Equipment and Staffing of Foodservice Operations 8 Designing Operational Areas, Equipment and Staffing of Foodservice Operations 9 Food and Beverage Service 10 Food and Beverage Service 11 Performance Appraisal and Decision Making 12 In-class test/presentation 13 Revision 14 Revision Recommended Textbook Food and Beverage Management by, John Cousins, David Foskett and Caolein Gillespie. Second edition, Published by Financial Times, Prentice Hall Caserani,V; Kinton, R and Foskett, D (2004), Practical Cookery, (Hodder and Stoughton)

Human Resource Management This module will provide the students with an in-depth understanding of the strategic and coherent approach to an organization's most valued assets - the people working there who individually and collectively contribute to the achievement of the objectives of the business. This module will also focus on effective business practices in the hospitality industry, like performance and reward management, to ensure the motivation and success of the human resource of the company. They will be introduced to different learning theories and styles, helping them reflect on their learning experience and increasing their effectiveness as independent self-learners. In addition, they will be involved with personal development planning (PDP) to improve their employability and professional skills. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: • • •

To have an understanding of the purpose, importance, and philosophy of human resource management and be able to trace the historical development of the field. To understand the internal organizational and external environmental factors influencing the implementation of human resource management policies. To evaluate the contribution of individual human resource activities to improving the quality of work life of employees and increasing productivity and effectiveness of organizations

Syllabus • • • • • • • • •

Introduction to HRM Strategic HRM Job Analysis and Job Design Human Resource Planning Recruitment and Selection Motivation and Work Behaviour Managing and Evaluating Employee Performance Human Resource Development Managing Compensation, Rewards and Performance Management

Lesson Plan Session Subject 1 Introduction to HRM 2 Strategic HRM 3 Job Analysis and Job Design 4 Human Resource Planning 5 Recruitment and Selection 6 Recruitment and Selection 7 Motivation and Work Behaviour 8 Managing and Evaluating Employee Performance 9 Human Resource Development 10 Managing Compensation, Rewards and Performance Management 11 Managing Compensation, Rewards and Performance Management 12 In class test/Presentation 13 Revision 14 Revision Recommended Textbook Eade, Vincent H.; Boella, M. J.; Goss-Turner, Steven (2005). Human Resources Management in the Hospitality Industry: An Introductory Guide. 8th ed. Oxford: Elsevier/ButterworthHeinemann.

Meetings, Incentives, Conferences and Events This module introduces students to this sector of the tourism industry, and will cover both business and leisure events. The specific characteristics of the Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, Events sector (MICE) will be discussed, including impacts for tourism development, conference marketing, management of meetings and conferences and the growing importance of event tourism will be discussed. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: Examine the key characteristics of the Meetings, Incentives, Conferences, Events sector (MICE) Illustrate the range of existing leisure events, analyse their characteristics and their role in the development of tourism Critically discuss the role of the government sector in managing, promoting and funding leisure events Critically assess the range of operational and management tasks necessary in order to manage events successfully









Syllabus          

Introduction to MICE Meetings Incentives Conferences Events Issues with MICE Marketing for MICE Venue Management Distribution and the Role of Travel Agents Planning and Project Management

Lesson Plan Session 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Subject Introduction to MICE Meetings Incentives Conferences Events Issues with MICE Marketing for MICE Venue Management Distribution and the Role of Travel Agents Planning and Project Management Planning and Project Management Case Study/In Class Test Revision Revision

Recommended textbook ‘Project Activities Planning and Management’, Author: Lynn Van Der Wagen’, Tourism Educational Publisher. Bowdin, Allen, O’Toole, Harris, McDonnell. 2011 (3ed) Events Management. Oxford Bowdin, G, Getz D and U Wunsch. 2010. Events Management Casebook, Oxford Management. Oxford Forsyth, P. 1999, Maximizing Hospitality Sales: How To Sell Hotels, Venues And Conference Centres, Cassell, London.

Marketing in Hospitality and Tourism This module will provide the learners with a wide understanding of the role of marketing and its application in the hospitality and tourism industries. It also helps the student to understand the marketing contexts better in achieving the organisations goals and objectives and also to maximise revenue and profit in a long term. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:     

Analyse and understand the role of marketing and its applications in a hospitality and tourism industry Develop marketing communications plans for the hospitality and tourism industry Understand and define the customer’s needs Examine the role of sales in the hospitality and tourism industry Develop marketing plan for a hospitality and tourism organisation

Syllabus      

Introduction to Marketing Planning and Strategy Market Research Customers Needs and Identification Marketing Tools Marketing Sales and Tools

Lesson Plan Session 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Subject Introduction to Marketing (1) Introduction to Marketing (2) Planning and Strategy (1) Planning and Strategy (2) Market Research Customers Needs and Tools Customers Needs and Tools Marketing Tools Marketing Tools Marketing Sales and Tools Marketing Sales and Tools Case Study/In Class Test Revision Revision

Recommended textbook

Marketing Communication in Tourism and Hospitality, McCabe, S. 2009. Oxford: Butterworth- Heinemann Issues in Hospitality and Tourism Industry This module covers the understanding how to identify emerging issues on the tourism and hospitality industry and examining their impact towards the hospitality and tourism industry. Students will be able to understand how important it is to tackle all the issues emerging in the hospitality and tourism industry because these issues really gives a great impact towards the industry. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:  Identify the common issues that occurs in hospitality and tourism industry  Analyse the information using accepted analytical data and techniques  Evaluate the reliability and validity of the information broadcasted by medias Understand the ethics and social responsibility Syllabus           

The Hospitality and Tourism Industry in the 21st Century Technology in Hospitality and Tourism Industry Globalisation Environmental Issues Green Issues PEST Impacts Domestic and International Issues Corporate Social Responsibilities and Ethics in Hospitality and Tourism Industry Risk and Crisis Management Change Management Business Continuity and Contingency Planning

Lesson Plan Session Subject 1 The Hospitality and Tourism Industry in the 21st Century 2 Technology in Hospitality and Tourism Industry 3 Globalisation 4 Environmental Issues 5 Green Issues 6 PEST Impacts 7 Domestic and International Issues 8 Corporate Social Responsibilities and Ethics in Hospitality and Tourism Industry 9 Risk and Crisis Management 10 Change Management 11 Business Continuity and Contingency Planning 12 Case Study/In Class Test 13 Revision

14 Revision Recommended textbook Understanding Tourism: A critical Introduction. Hannam K and Knox, D.2010. London : Sage Resort Management This module introduces students the function of management as an integrating activity within the hotel and resort sectors. It will investigate the principles behind the concepts of resort management including: quality management; operational strategies; performance and control systems. Students will also consider the use of revenue and pricing; principles of sustainability, effective marketing approaches as well as legal considerations. Learning outcomes: On successful completion of this module, students should: Understand and discuss the development of this sector Apply management principles and techniques to resort business to analyse and evaluate their functional strategies Analyse the value of being able to forecast demand and apply principles of effecting change through tactical price setting, product development and revenue management Apply principles of holistic management performance measurement and assess key performance indicators Appraise the sustainability of resort businesses and the possible future directions

 







Syllabus  

      

Resorts: Overview, Features and History Challenges for the Resort Market  Market conditions  Changing demand trends  Competition Resort Seasonality Governance Challenges and Strategies for Resort Management Marketing Issues for Resorts Environmental and site management HR Practices The Future of Resorts

Lesson Plan Session 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Subject Introduction, Overview, Features and History Challenges for Resort Market Challenges for Resort Market Resort Seasonality Governance Challenges and Strategies for Resort Management Challenges and Strategies for Resort Management Marketing Issues for Resorts Environmental and Site Management HR Practices The Future of Resorts Case Study/In Class Test Revision Revision

Recommended textbook Murphy. Peter, 2008. The Business of Resort Management. Butterworth-Heinemann

Niche and Speciality Tourism Niche Tourism studies a wide range of forms of tourism that are becoming increasingly important for the tourism industry. The module covers: culinary and beverage tourism; health and medical tourism; and a wide range of speciality/niche types of tourism. This will provide students with the ability to recognise and apply strategies appropriate for particular circumstances and successfully compete for visitors. Learning outcomes On successful completion of this module, students should: Demonstrate ability and knowledge necessary to target niche markets in a more effective manner, according to the needs of business as well as market development Interpret market trends and match and design or redesign niche tourism products appropriate to a particular destination Find, evaluate, use and appropriately refer to relevant information







Syllabus            

Introduction to Niche Tourism Culinary and Beverage Tourism Health and Medical Tourism Speciality/Niche Tourism Special interest tourism Dark tourism Film induced tourism Traditional culture based tourism Activity/Sports tourism Extreme tourism Marketing for niche tourism Future trends

Lesson Plan Session 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Subject Introduction Food and Beverage Tourism Health and Medical Tourism Speciality/Niche Tourism Special Interest Tourism Dark and Film induced Tourism Traditional and Culture Tourism Activity/Sports Tourism Extreme Tourism Marketing Niche Tourism Future Trends Case Study/In Class Test Revision Revision

Recommended textbook Novelli, M. 2005 Niche tourism: Contemporary issues, trends and cases. ButterworthHeinemann Smith, M., Puczko, L. 2008. Health and Wellness Tourism. Butterworth-Heinemann